Main definitions of ding in English

: ding1ding2ding3

ding1

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Make a ringing sound.

    ‘cash registers were dinging softly’
    • ‘The microwave dinged and Leon seemed to get a little shocked from the noise.’
    • ‘As he got into a comfortable sleeping position, his foot brushed against something that started dinging.’
    • ‘When the green light above the elevator dinged quietly he flattened himself against the side of the wall closest to the elevator door and pushed Peaches forward so that she was doing the same.’
    • ‘As soon as the cash drawer dinged and slid out, the suspect reached into his waistband, pulled out a pistol, and screamed at the poor kid behind the counter to dump all the money in a bag, and do it fast!’
    • ‘The microwave dinged again and Adam pulled out his lunch.’
    • ‘The elevator dinged as it touched the ground, ‘Of course, how silly of me.’’
    • ‘If I don't take the food out two minutes after the bell goes ‘ding’, it dings at me again, and louder!’
    • ‘The elevator dinged when he touched the ‘Down’ button.’
    • ‘The button lit up, and something above them dinged.’
    • ‘The elevator dinged and the doors slid open again, revealing a completely different world from the one they had left on the main floor of the hotel.’
    • ‘The continued the rest of the ride in silence and stepped out onto their drabby floor when the doors dinged open.’
    • ‘My dinger is dinging, the pasta is ready so I part it from the water.’
    • ‘The elevator dinged and once more the doors opened, ‘This way.’’
    • ‘My Super Duper Creep Detection Sense was dinging like crazy.’
    • ‘The microwave dinged and Andy handed the plate to Cassidy.’
    • ‘I was cleaning out my SPAM folder last night when the computer dinged and another email landed in the SPAM folder… asking for a dimensional generator.’
    • ‘The elevator dinged again and the doors opened.’
    • ‘While it was baking I ran upstairs and worked until the timer dinged.’
    • ‘Stick an egg-timer in front of him and when it dings, dinner is over.’
    • ‘Ding, ding, ding, The ring rang out across the school grounds and all the students raced to the door to get to their lockers first, along with Loan and Tobias.’
    chime, ring out, chime out, toll, peal, knell
    ringing, chime, carillon, toll, tolling, peal, knell
    View synonyms

exclamation

  • Used to imitate a metallic ringing sound resembling a bell.

    • ‘Ding, ding - it was a pity her brother wasn't here to ring the bell.’
    • ‘The Wicked Witch - ding, dong - isn't dead anymore.’
    • ‘‘Ding, ding, ding, we have a winner’ she said with a coy smile.’
    • ‘‘Ding ding ding, round two,’ he muttered, still bearing a grudge from the burns, and the being thrown into the seats.’
    • ‘Although one conductor only a few years ago on route 75 instead of pulling the cord twice just used to shout to the driver ‘ding ding!’’

Origin

Early 17th century: imitative.

Pronunciation

ding

/dɪŋ/

Main definitions of ding in English

: ding1ding2ding3

ding2

noun

North American
informal
  • 1A mark or dent on the bodywork of a car, boat, or other vehicle.

    • ‘All right, so the question is, as this data continues to flow in, and engineers are assessing what sort of dings and dents might have occurred, many reporters are asking the question, how serious is it?’
    • ‘You stop the dents and the dings in your own garage, but what about in the parking lot?’
    • ‘It must be smooth, clean and free from cracks and dings.’
    • ‘Additionally, there was no forearm to protect the tubular magazine from dents and dings.’
    • ‘The Stanley Cup has suffered dents and dings and, no doubt, it has been a witness to wondrous - and scandalous - things while being passed from hand to hand at bars and parties around the world.’
    • ‘The report we got back was that there were 25 small dings.’
    • ‘At the very end of the line I saw a woman with a little paint brush in hand examining each machine that came out of the inspection tower for any dings in the paint.’
    • ‘Often they bounce around on a truck seat, or maybe ride in a saddle scabbard all day strapped to an unruly mustang, acquiring numerous dings and dents.’
    • ‘Does it show signs of obvious abuse, such as dents, dings, or heavy scratches?’
    • ‘Your nails will catch in scratches, dings and cracks that your fingertips won't feel.’
    • ‘After a stealth aircraft flies, maintenance workers must recoat the skin, repairing the tiny dings and burrs that increase the craft's radar signature.’
    • ‘My car has a few scrapes and dings on it that I need to take care of in the next couple of months.’
    • ‘The four-ply seams won't tear or unravel, and the soft but tough 1-inch tie-downs won't put dings or scratches on your boat's hull.’
    • ‘It had a few scrapes and dings on it, so I had to get those taken care of before it goes back to the dealership at the end of the lease in 5 days.’
    • ‘And with the exception of a few dings and dents, it looks pretty much the way it did when it rolled off the line on July 11, 1960.’
    • ‘While you were drinking the coffee, the dealer's helpers were wetting down the merchandise, giving a false impression of good luster and camouflaging the dings.’
    • ‘Damage modeling is limited to minor dings and bumps.’
    • ‘While you can bang out the dents and dings somewhat on the track, there will also be a certain amount of destruction to you vehicle that's just irreparable.’
    • ‘It started as a little ding and the machine's constant vibration keeps making it worse.’
    • ‘Photographs show the shuttle's protective tiles has about 25 dings in it.’
    1. 1.1Scottish dialect A blow on the head.
      • ‘I thought he was going to have another ding at Rob and his arms were everywhere.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Dent (something).

    • ‘Be careful when hammering the nails not to ding the wood as a scar may be the result.’
    • ‘Pausing only to drop my board and badly ding its nose, I returned to the car to find my friend lounging around.’
    • ‘Many would have thought that the Newspapers would have dropped their society diary author when he dinged his car against a lamp-post whilst leathered.’
    • ‘Also be careful not to ding the edge of the panel when nailing or handling.’
    • ‘Right… Tell your Mom I'm sorry I dinged her car, again and yeah, sorry for being so rude earlier.’
    • ‘In addition, new boards loose considerable resale value after they are dinged or shattered a few times.’
    • ‘It had dinged and dented spacecraft from day one, a maintenance headache, but not seen as a real threat.’
    • ‘Bullet cases also get nicked and dinged by a gun, so examiners often scrutinize them, too.’
    • ‘And I haven't even dinged the car, which is probably one of the top five fears on my driving list.’
    • ‘The windshield of my old car got dinged by hail once, but that's it.’
    • ‘‘They were dinged up a lot last year, and they were really good,’ says one SEC offensive coordinator.’
    • ‘I was on lunch break one day when the guy who was filling in for me dinged a car in the parking lot and didn't tell anyone.’
    • ‘A piece of concrete scratched one line officer, and a tiny fragment of lead from the 200 gr. bullet dinged the chin of an adjacent shooter.’
    • ‘Simon parked in the back of the parking lot, out where there weren't any other cars, taking up two spots so some little high school twit wouldn't ding his car.’
    • ‘Windshields and bumpers are no substitute for massive collisions or destructive impacts, although you'll swear these cars were only lightly dinged.’
    • ‘If you're not too careful, you can seriously ding your motherboard.’
    1. 1.1 Hit (someone), especially on the head.
      ‘I dinged him one’
      • ‘Nothing spectacular but the Saints managed just two good runs over the middle of the line even though Martin was dinged in the third quarter.’
      • ‘All spent cases landed well away from the shooters, incidentally, and none came back to ding our foreheads as some of the mini .45s are prone to do.’
      • ‘‘I wondered if I had gotten dinged, and maybe I wasn't thinking straight,’ he says.’
      • ‘The cornerbacks have been dinged and beaten badly on occasion.’
      • ‘And so you just ding the enemies to death, and they're dumb enough to let you do it.’
      • ‘If a receiver tips or deflects the ball and a player from the opposing team catches it, it's the quarterback who gets dinged while the receiver gets away unscathed.’
      • ‘And if you've ever been surfing or body-surfing, you get hit, you get dinged as you're washed along on the shore.’
      hit over the head, hit on the head, hit, strike, buffet, bang, knock, thwack, slug, welt, cuff, punch, smash
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2ding intoScottish no object Bump into.
      ‘he dings into doorways like a bearing in a pinball machine’
      • ‘So when she smashed into you, did your car ding into the car in front of you?’
      • ‘He let go from the hip as he reeled forward and the slug dinged into the trunk of the car two inches from my left leg.’
      • ‘So while mainstream media offered the sweeping panorama, video diaries took us where TV couldn't or wouldn't - running into air-raid shelters in the Israel-Hizballah war, crouching behind an armored vehicle with a soldier in Samarra, bullets dinging into metal off camera.’

Origin

Middle English: probably of Scandinavian origin; compare with Danish dænge ‘beat, bang’.

Pronunciation

ding

/dɪŋ/

Main definitions of ding in English

: ding1ding2ding3

ding3

noun

Australian
informal
  • A lively party or celebration.

    social gathering, gathering, social occasion, social event, social function, function, get-together, celebration, reunion, festivity, jamboree, reception, at-home, soirée, social
    View synonyms

Origin

1950s: perhaps from ding-dong or wingding.

Pronunciation

ding

/dɪŋ/