Definition of dinar in English:

dinar

noun

  • 1The basic monetary unit of Serbia, equal to 100 paras.

    • ‘While defence and foreign affairs are run jointly, Serbia, with a population of 7.5 million, has remained with the dinar, while Montenegro, population 660,000, uses the euro.’
    • ‘The German mark was introduced as a parallel currency to the Yugoslav dinar and then the euro.’
    • ‘In 1992 the national bank issued single bank notes of 500 billion Serbian dinars.’
    • ‘Serbia and Montenegro may still be part of the same country, but they are drifting apart, and Montenegro's refusal to do business in dinars is step one in the divorce.’
    • ‘Perhaps the customs officers had finally accepted that our last little tribute of leva and Serbian dinars was all that they were likely to squeeze out of this particular lemon.’
  • 2The basic monetary unit of certain countries of the Middle East and North Africa, equal to 1000 fils in Jordan, Bahrain, and Iraq, 1000 dirhams in Libya, and 100 centimes in Algeria.

    • ‘Already we have one major accounting scandal - courtesy of an Italian basket-case of a company - and a US dollar that seems to be linked to the Iraqi dinar.’
    • ‘The cost of fuel has already quadrupled here over the last couple of days, while the value of the Iraqi Dinar has slumped, down from 9.5 dinars to the dollar on Saturday to 6 today.’
    • ‘His family reportedly was awarded 100 million dinars the equivalent of $34,000, a fortune in Iraq.’
    • ‘I hadn't had a chance to change any dollars in the the new Iraqi dinars, so the miracle lady paid my ‘tip’ to the driver.’
    • ‘The authorities have allocated 1.5 billion Iraqi dinars for the construction of permanent exhibition facilities and organization of trade fairs and exhibitions to promote commerce.’
    • ‘If you go to Iraq they would pay us 30 dinars a day.’
    • ‘A liter of gasoline cost around 20 Iraqi Dinars when one US dollar equaled 2,000 Iraqi dinars.’
    • ‘It is possible that the gold-backed Islamic dinar may replace the dollar as the global trading standard or that China or the European Union may seize the moment to offer the world a stable replacement currency.’
    • ‘The north, he said, would continue with the dinar and south Sudan would adopt the new Sudan pound.’
    • ‘Trade with Jordan has rebounded to its prewar levels, reaching 350 million Jordanian dinars in the first eight months of the year.’
    • ‘The Iraqi dinar continues to appreciate against the U.S. dollar, which now buys 1,250 dinars, instead of the pre-election 1, 460.’
    • ‘The company also plans to install the country's first network of automated teller machines, which would enable cardholders to withdraw Iraqi dinars or U.S. dollars from their accounts.’
    • ‘Tunisia has a strong currency (one dinar equals 72 cents).’
    • ‘Between 1950 and 1958, total oil revenues leaped from 5.3 million Iraqi dinars to 79.9 million Iraqi dinars.’
    • ‘Jordan earned 61 million dinars from phosphate exports in 1987.’
    • ‘Though each traveler pays 15 Jordanian dinars - about $20 USD - for the ride to Baghdad, Bilal makes only about $40 USD for each round trip, a journey that generally has him away from home for four or five days.’
  • 3A monetary unit of Iran, equal to one hundredth of a rial.

Origin

From Arabic and Persian dīnār, Turkish and Serbian dinar, via late Greek from Latin denarius (see denarius).

Pronunciation:

dinar

/ˈdiːnɑː/