Definition of din in English:

din

noun

  • [in singular] A loud, unpleasant, and prolonged noise.

    ‘the fans made an awful din’
    • ‘I just didn't want to add my voice to the din of noise that has filled the public square regarding this tragic woman's fate.’
    • ‘While attending the lectures, the din of clashes outside the campus was audible.’
    • ‘In the background I read that towards the end of its life as a chapel in the convict period, free settlers got very cross with the fact that the convicts were making an awful din from under their pews.’
    • ‘A couple of days of silence make the din seem so much louder.’
    • ‘‘Hello darling,’ said Lewis on the other end above a loud din in the background.’
    • ‘Animals added their noises to the din, poultry screeching and draft animals lowing as they were displayed and examined.’
    • ‘I would have liked to converse with her a little further about the food sources, but the ear-deafening din meant that barking our orders to her was about all we could do.’
    • ‘‘Go away, I'm busy’ he yelled above the din of the sewing machine.’
    • ‘In an instant, it was clear that the ward was an intolerably noisy place, flooded with a near-continuous din of screams, laughter, and loud vocalizations.’
    • ‘‘I want to come back when it's a bit quieter,’ I shouted over the din of amplified music, throbbing diesel generators and rattling joy rides.’
    • ‘Finding it difficult to handle them at home, many owners go in search of kennels where they are safely housed from the din and noise.’
    • ‘The next moment his loud shout rose over the din of battle, and swinging his hat over his head for a banner to those who pressed after, he spurred against the flying enemy.’
    • ‘It has something to do with the book reviewing climate and the endless din buzzing around readers and publishers alike.’
    • ‘The people were inside and the radio was turned up loud to drown out the din of the men yelling and laughing as they drank coffee and beer.’
    • ‘If you listen closely enough, you should be able to make out the angry words above the din: a cacophony of female voices raised to the rafters with one common message for their menfolk.’
    • ‘Although its cries were becoming increasingly desperate as the din of barking and shouting intensified, the thought of trying to help never entered my mind.’
    • ‘People shout to be heard over the din, loud mufflerless trucks rumble by on the street, dogs bark, a mysterious polytonal chittering in the background sounds like a great horde of rats.’
    • ‘The merry din of talk, laughter, music, and clattering dinnerware spills outside.’
    • ‘The plant is noisy, and she and her co-workers pass the time by shouting over the din, catching up on gossip and talking about food and cosmetics.’
    • ‘Every England fan had a whooping, whistling counterpart so we shouted louder until the din was indescribable.’
    uproar, racket, loud noise, confused noise, commotion, cacophony, babel, hubbub, tumult, fracas, clangour, crash, clatter, clash
    shouting, yelling, screaming, caterwauling, babble, babbling, clamour, outcry
    brouhaha, fuss, disturbance, ado
    pandemonium, bedlam, chaos, confusion
    stramash
    hullabaloo, rumpus, ruction
    row
    vociferation, ululation, charivari
    View synonyms

verb

  • 1[with object] Make (someone) learn or remember an idea by constant repetition.

    ‘a runner-up, he dinned into them, was a loser’
    • ‘With the memory of all the talk against the man that had been dinned into her ears, I looked at her narrowly.’
    • ‘Day after day he had to din it into her that persistent work, and not ability alone, was essential for success.’
    • ‘I have noticed that a high proportion of men do not trouble to wash their hands after using public toilets - possibly partly due to hand-washing not having been dinned into them during childhood and partly due to a macho outlook.’
    • ‘The arguments for genetically modified organisms that have been dinned into us for 15 years are based on an almost sublime misreading of the world's food problems.’
    • ‘Neither does the narrative din it into the viewer.’
    • ‘Only when the message that Labour isn't all that clever, after all, is dinned into the voters can National risk changing the subject to its own intentions.’
    • ‘A local teacher dinned into us some other principles of the game.’
    • ‘So far, they have not been dinned into us in pubs but the time is nigh.’
    • ‘I'm beginning to see that I'm really a clever woman in my own line, and not the ‘uneducated’ woman that I've had dinned into me.’
    • ‘None of us even thought of looking strangely at him, dinning third-year Circuit Theory into our heads.’
    • ‘It was dinned into us that wasting water was sinful.’
    • ‘We, meanwhile, struggle to din some culture into our own young people whose aspirations have been hijacked by the consumerism of big corporations.’
    • ‘I would not even ask him for charity, or have it dinned into his ears that it is his duty to help the poor.’
    • ‘It is dinned into him that the wife must always be subordinate to the husband.’
    instil, drive, drum, hammer, drill, implant, ingrain, inculcate
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  • 2[no object] Make a loud, unpleasant, and prolonged noise.

    ‘the sound dinned irritatingly into Marian's head’
    • ‘He opened the door and the noise dinned into the office.’
    • ‘An amplified quacking noise dinned from the speakers, and the image of an imprinting experiment, with a duckling following a moving wooden decoy around in circles appeared on the screen.’
    blare, blast, clang, clatter, crash, clamour
    View synonyms

Origin

Old English dyne, dynn (noun), dynian (verb), of Germanic origin; related to Old High German tuni (noun) and Old Norse dynr (noun), dynja come rumbling down.

Pronunciation:

din

/dɪn/

Definition of DIN in English:

DIN

noun

  • Any of a series of technical standards originating in Germany and used internationally, especially to designate electrical connections, film speeds, and paper sizes.

    [as modifier] ‘a DIN socket’

Origin

Early 20th century: acronym from Deutsche Industrie-Norm German Industrial Standard (as laid down by the Deutsches Institut für Normung German Institute for Standards).

Pronunciation:

DIN

/dɪn/