Definition of dime bag in English:

dime bag

noun

North American
informal
  • A specified amount of an illegal drug, packaged and sold for a fixed price:

    ‘a dime bag of marijuana’
    • ‘When you fill them with pot, they become dime bags, $10 a pop.’
    • ‘There is something really depressing, however, about the idea of having to go into the Pacific Centre for a dime bag.’
    • ‘I pulled out a dime bag filled with cocaine from an inside pocket.’
    • ‘This isn't just a situation where a player got caught with half a joint and a dime bag.’
    • ‘With a title as tempting as this, our Mary Jane journey should have been a sizable dime bag better.’
    • ‘There's the Ivy League dork who thinks that weed alone will make him popular; he just gets beat up for his backpack, as if his lunch money from elementary school has become a dime bag at Princeton.’
    • ‘And if they had thought school was for losers and the cool thing to do was to hang out all day listening to music and running dime bags for the local narcotics emporium, I would have been right there with them.’
    • ‘With it he can safely pick up syringes, condoms, dime bags and other sex and drug paraphernalia.’
    • ‘There was no porn mag stuck between these pages, and neither were these pages glued together to look like a book while the middle was cut out to create a perfect hiding place for a dime bag.’
    • ‘We get to the container just as a man on a bench is extracting drugs from a dime bag with a syringe.’
    • ‘And the last dime bag had cost over a thousand dollars.’
    • ‘Are you saying that the Famous Ukrainian Mafia doesn't have enough coin already to buy dime bags of weed, so they'll jack your car first for the sole purpose of paying the kingpins in Vancouver for grass-filled garbage bags?’
    • ‘Now, quick, hide that dime bag before Junior sees it.’
    • ‘Caitlin glanced to Lucas oddly, and then pulled a small dime bag of marijuana from her pocket, wiggling it slightly in the air.’
    • ‘After digging around between the couch cushions for a while, he discovered that the dime bag he'd stashed there a few weeks before had gone missing somewhere.’
    • ‘But there's good old Jay, standing there on the street corner in his school tie and blazer, waiting for his ‘friend’ to come back with the dime bag he said he was going to buy when he ducked down the alley three hours ago - with Jay's money.’