Definition of digraph in English:

digraph

noun

  • 1A combination of two letters representing one sound, as in ph and ey.

    • ‘That at least explains the surface resemblance of the two words, differing only by digraphs (ch- and qu-) representing single consonants.’
    • ‘The articulated goal in the reading program is to teach digraphs to help students recognize sound letter relationships and patterns for spelling.’
    • ‘For example, D. W. was not automatic in his ability to retrieve the sounds for many of the vowel digraphs and diphthongs but was able to decode words with these combinations if given a cue, such as the LiPS description.’
    • ‘For example, no child read pharbid, a word containing both a vowel r pattern and a consonant digraph not taught in tutoring, correctly at pre- or post-test.’
    • ‘At post-test, many children showed improvement in their knowledge of long vowel sounds, short vowel sounds, and consonant digraphs; fewer children improved in knowledge of sounds for vowel r or vowel team patterns.’
    • ‘Children showed the most growth in categories involving closed syllable patterns (short vowel words with single consonants, digraphs, and blends) and long-vowel words (including magic e).’
    • ‘Now the word is spelled ‘oedipus’ and the digraph is gone from American English orthography.’
    • ‘Almost all of the novice teachers spent time working on lax or short vowel sounds, tense or long vowel sounds, and consonant digraphs; on the closed syllable type; and on decoding words with a variety of closed syllable patterns.’
    • ‘He read most of the closed and silent-e-pattern words and had the most difficulty with vowel digraphs and diphthongs.’
    • ‘Another term, vowel digraphs, pertains to single vowel sounds represented by a pair of letters.’
    • ‘J does not normally feature in words of Old English origin, the digraph dg representing the sound medially and finally (cudgel, bridge), but some j words (ajar, jowl) may be of Germanic origin.’
    • ‘The vowel digraphs ea and ou when followed by r may also have this value: earn, journey.’
    1. 1.1Printing
      A character consisting of two joined letters; a ligature.
      • ‘The ligature digraph æ in ‘Ælfric’, ‘Cæsar’, ‘encyclopædia’ was originally used in Latin and adopted by Old English for the vowel in hat (hæt), often referred to as ASH.’

Pronunciation:

digraph

/ˈdʌɪɡrɑːf/