Definition of differ in English:

differ

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1Be unlike or dissimilar.

    ‘the second set of data differed from the first’
    ‘tastes differ, especially in cars’
    ‘widely differing circumstances’
    • ‘The parameter was identical within each tree, but it differed from one tree to another.’
    • ‘It sounds kind of reductionist to sum people up by their musical tastes and how they differ from yours.’
    • ‘The four species in the present study had wings that differed widely in shape.’
    • ‘The activities of ripening-related enzymes also differ widely between species.’
    • ‘The treatment of Non Hodgkin lymphoma differs widely, depending on the kind of lymphoma you have.’
    • ‘The predator community found in our study differed from that found in North Dakota.’
    • ‘Comparisons are difficult, since circumstances differed from place to place and from one decade to another.’
    • ‘Though eating patterns have differed widely by region and culture, some broad historical patterns can be outlined.’
    • ‘Then, too, he makes allowances for customs that differed from one manor to the next.’
    • ‘Non-rhotic pronunciation differs widely in its prestige, depending on where it occurs.’
    • ‘Their tactics were not standard, but differed from valley to valley and tribe to tribe.’
    • ‘The new state brought together groups that differed from each other in many respects.’
    • ‘They are dotted across the spectrum, and differ widely from area to area.’
    • ‘It's hard to generalise about plot prices, as they will differ widely by size and location.’
    • ‘Compensation was reduced to recover benefits already paid, but the amount deducted differed from benefit to benefit.’
    • ‘All have obvious, if widely differing, talents but so far none has managed to capitalise upon them.’
    • ‘I still remember the taste of those eggs, which differed from normal ones I had every morning.’
    • ‘Forms of social community and their changes over time differed widely in China and the West.’
    • ‘In each case he shows how they were similar to or differed from their non-Jewish peers.’
    • ‘And yet there are plenty of examples of ways this war differed from any other previously fought.’
    vary, be different, be unlike, be dissimilar, be distinguishable, diverge
    deviate from, depart from, run counter to, contradict, contrast with, conflict with, be incompatible with, be at odds with, be in opposition to, go against
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Disagree.
      ‘he differed from his contemporaries in ethical matters’
      • ‘Decision making about futility and techniques of withdrawal is difficult and subject to differing opinion.’
      • ‘Their power lies in signifying recognition of the other person's problem or differing viewpoint.’
      • ‘No doubt differing cultural perspectives played an important role in the schism of 1927.’
      • ‘As with any group there may be differing points of view on subjects brought to the list.’
      • ‘To the extent that this interpretation differed from that of the Inspector, the point needed no further explanation.’
      • ‘On this, it seems clear that the classical economists differed from their critics.’
      • ‘Another problem is differing interpretations of what it means to use a client-side certificate.’
      • ‘We collected voices that offer shifting images and differing interpretations of the same landscape.’
      • ‘Among his rivals on tour, there are differing opinions on his victory.’
      • ‘Did people with differing viewpoints get a fair chance to speak, in your opinion?’
      • ‘I personally would argue strongly for the right of anyone to differ with me.’
      • ‘Many times this Court's views have differed from those of the House of Lords.’
      • ‘The most common wrangles are on a founder leader differing with others who troop out to form new churches.’
      • ‘Verdi scholars hold differing opinions as to when he actually espoused the nationalist cause.’
      • ‘The two traditions draw on differing interpretations of the American ‘national interest’.’
      • ‘Do the majority and dissenting opinions differ about how to characterize them?’
      • ‘Now I don't mind anyone leaving a comment, after all people have differing opinions on any subject.’
      • ‘The theme reflects an attempt to find common cause between differing perspectives on environmental issues.’
      • ‘Conservatives differ in terms of which of these approaches we think is the best.’
      • ‘He said however that he differed on the subject of war and would set out his point of view accordingly.’
      disagree, fail to agree, dissent, be at variance, be in dispute, be in opposition, take issue, conflict, clash, cross swords, lock horns, be at each other's throats
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • agree to differ

    • Cease to argue about something because neither party will compromise or be persuaded.

      • ‘A few left, but most agreed to differ and the congregation grew.’
      • ‘We agreed to differ on many things and we also dealt with the issues that we should be dealing with.’
      • ‘I know passions tend to run high on this kind of subject, but can we all at least try to agree to differ and respect each other's paths?’
      • ‘Perhaps the first step in creating a culture in which people are unafraid to speak out is to listen respectfully to each other's views, and be able to gracefully agree to differ where consensus is impossible.’
      • ‘And we now agree to differ on some of the points which he and I earlier had a debate about.’
      • ‘In some of the best debates in parapsychology the proponents and critics have ended up simply agreeing to differ or failing to reach any agreement.’
      • ‘We obviously can't just agree to differ on these kinds of questions.’
      • ‘One issue they agree to differ on is the mock exams.’
      • ‘I stood my ground, and he stood his, and we agreed to differ, although he still remains a very good news source.’
      • ‘And if reconciliation is impossible, agree to differ with grace.’
  • beg to differ

    • Politely disagree.

      • ‘‘This is obviously an extremely dangerous game,’ he opined, and none begged to differ.’
      • ‘A prominent Beverly Hills estate agent begged to differ; if the property could be subdivided, he felt it could attract offers of around $20m.’
      • ‘‘I don't think we're very good students anymore,’ she says; however, Carmen begged to differ.’
      • ‘Much of the rest of civilization begs to differ.’
      • ‘You can't imagine there being a time when film wasn't part of her plans - although she begs to differ.’
      • ‘Danny, who has worked here for three years, begs to differ.’
      • ‘A great many economic historians have begged to differ.’
      • ‘The industry begs to differ, arguing that what we are witnessing is a cultural change and that the health and fitness club will remain an important part of the commercial property market.’
      • ‘And if anyone assumes there is anything slapped together about it, he begs to differ.’
      • ‘I beg to differ in my reaction to it and in my opinion on the matters she raises in her letter.’
      protest, protest against, lodge a protest, lodge a protest against, express objections, raise objections, express objections to, raise objections to, express disapproval, express disapproval of, express disagreement, express disagreement with, oppose, be in opposition, be in opposition to, take exception, take exception to, take issue, take issue with, take a stand against, have a problem, have a problem with, argue, argue against, remonstrate, remonstrate against, make a fuss, make a fuss about, quarrel with, disapprove, disapprove of, condemn, draw the line, draw the line at, demur, mind, complain, complain about, moan, moan about, grumble, grumble about, grouse, grouse about, cavil, cavil at, quibble, quibble about
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (also in the sense ‘put off, defer’): from Old French differer ‘differ, defer’, from Latin differre, from dis- ‘from, away’ + ferre ‘bring, carry’. Compare with defer.

Pronunciation

differ

/ˈdɪfə/