Definition of die on one's feet in English:

die on one's feet

phrase

informal
  • Come to a sudden or premature end.

    ‘critics said the show would die on its feet’
    • ‘Small shops are dying on their feet as a result of the anti-competitive practices of the big chains, such as running loss leaders.’
    • ‘The lakes in the west are dying on their feet and it is sad to see the trout population drop so dramatically.’
    • ‘The simple fact of the matter is football clubs in the lower reaches of the game are dying on their feet with the demise of ITV Digital yet another nail in the coffin for many.’
    • ‘But the demand for live matches was now proving insatiable, as a growing consensus developed that highlights were dying on their feet, and that live games were the only way to revive football as a TV event.’
    • ‘‘The players are dying on their feet out there and I had to make two substitutes before half-time,’ Dalziel said afterwards.’
    • ‘Some day they are going to learn that it is preferable, politically speaking, to die on their feet than live on their knees.’
    • ‘The professor said it is a common assumption that British resorts are dying on their feet.’
    • ‘There are far too many towns all over the world dying on their feet because shopping centres and huge malls have taken over.’
    • ‘Concluding, he noted that village communities are dying on their feet and the number of pupils at rural schools is in decline.’
    • ‘He claims that political parties are dying on their feet and that the election revealed barely disguised hostility to the political process.’