Definition of dideoxyinosine in English:

dideoxyinosine

(also DDI)

noun

Medicine
  • [mass noun] A drug which inhibits the replication of HIV and is used in the treatment of AIDS, especially in combination with zidovudine. It is a synthetic analogue of a purine nucleoside.

    • ‘We have now extended these studies to investigate the induction of mutants and micronuclei in mice treated neonatally with ddI or ddI in combination with AZT.’
    • ‘A much publicized case in point is that of didanosine or ddI, a key antiretroviral patented by the US-based drug transnational Bristol-Myers Squibb.’
    • ‘Several analogs are used to interfere with the replication of HIV, such as AZT and ddI (dideoxyinosine).’
    • ‘In January 2001 the Food and Drug Administration issued a special warning to pregnant women taking nucleoside analogues ddI and d4T after three women died.’
    • ‘The drugs ZDV and 3TC are manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline; ddI, d4T and EFV are manufactured by Bristol-Myers Squibb Company; and NFV is manufactured by Pfizer.’

Origin

1970s: from di- ‘two’ + deoxy- (in the sense ‘that has lost oxygen’) + inosine.

Pronunciation:

dideoxyinosine

/ˌdʌɪdɪɒksɪˈɪnəʊsiːn/