Main definitions of diddy in English

: diddy1diddy2

diddy1

noun

British
informal
  • A fool:

    ‘what a diddy!’
    • ‘ITV's audience figures failed to go through the roof, and this episode proved once again that viewers want good-quality programmes and talented presenters, not vacuous diddies like him.’
    • ‘It's also like being a goalkeeper, who is a diddy if he makes a mistake and the team loses.’
    • ‘This viewer even thought he heard Vipond self-deprecatingly claim on Thursday: ‘I'm a diddy,’ though if I am misquoting the man, I offer sincere apologies.’
    • ‘He is like one of those diddies down the pub, who must win at everything he takes part in - dominoes, darts, pool, the lot.’
    • ‘‘We need a team, not three good trainers and 12 diddies,’ says Preston, adding that it worked, with part of the proof arriving in the form of 12 of the players begging to be let in to the gym on Christmas Eve.’
    • ‘In the meantime pray that diddy Darren Day gets his comeuppance.’
    • ‘He pointed out that he had shared the pleasure along with Vogts of being made to look something of a diddy by the likes of Johann Cryuff and Kevin Keegan in their pomp.’

Origin

Late 18th century: alteration of titty.

Pronunciation:

diddy

/ˈdɪdi/

Main definitions of diddy in English

: diddy1diddy2

diddy2

adjective

British
informal
  • Little:

    ‘a little diddy baby hedgehog’
    • ‘Your driving view is uncluttered and cockpit-like, making the diddy Ford extremely manoeuvrable in car parks and overcrowded city streets.’
    • ‘And they sure beat the errant lawnmower effect of the original small cars, like the Beetle - diddy car, comically large turning circle.’
    • ‘It's a diddy gig guide this week, and it only features Chico, Coldplay, Nizlopi, Oasis, Mark Owen, The Pogues and Joss Stone.’
    • ‘What you should remember is that, unlike in the US, these papers have national coverage, because we're a bit diddy over here and a journey from one end of the country to the other is like a trip to the local corner shop in some states of America.’
    • ‘There's a little diddy baby hedgehog (about the size of my fist) in The Coven Grounds at the moment.’
    • ‘Today, shambling down to the pub, the little diddy bus round the corner arrived bloody early- a good five minutes or so, just as I'd turned out of my front door.’
    • ‘Once upon a time the land was deer park, now it is an intricate pattern of hummock-shaped pastures, small fields, small field barns, diddy gates and ridge and furrow grassland.’
    • ‘At a diddy three inches square and one inch thick when folded the major selling points is of course in-built screen lighting, something Atari and Sega managed well over a decade ago at high cost.’
    • ‘If you've never heard of emulators before, they're diddy wee programs that let you run software from other platforms outside the native hardware.’
    • ‘Oh yeah - now I've fixed my scanner, here's the artwork for the Cristina single (sadly cropped - it's only a diddy scanner).’

Origin

Probably a child's corruption of little.

Pronunciation:

diddy

/ˈdɪdi/