Definition of dice in English:

dice

noun

  • 1A small cube with each side having a different number of spots on it, ranging from one to six, thrown and used in gambling and other games involving chance.

    See also die
    • ‘The children roll dice, and, depending on where they land, they have to act out or answer the questions.’
    • ‘Modern scholarship has not yet established the game for which these dice were used.’
    • ‘Cluedo is a game with simple rules, with luck limited to the minor role of the movement of pawns by dice.’
    • ‘The upholstery is black, and she has red fuzzy dice hanging from her rearview mirror.’
    • ‘Hence, the three dice all have the same total face value.’
    • ‘He figured out that you didn't really need dice or mathematical models to make a workable baseball role-playing game.’
    • ‘A defender with two or more armies rolls two dice, and one with one army rolls one die.’
    • ‘You roll two dice to attack in the game and if you roll doubles, you have to stop!’
    • ‘When was the last time you saw some fluffy dice, or any other strange car accessories?’
    • ‘You rolled the dice and gambled - what have you got to lose?’
    • ‘I still have a huge collection of dice from my gaming days.’
    • ‘And they're casting dice, for your future.’
    • ‘Gauss's guess was based on throwing a dice with one side marked ‘prime’ and the others all blank.’
    • ‘If you throw a dice and guess any number between 1 and 6, the chances that your guess will be correct are 1 / 6.’
    • ‘When you throw the dice, the odds of any given outcome can be calculated.’
    • ‘At the core of the game is throwing dice on the table for positioning.’
    • ‘However dice are thrown, chance will pull the result in an unexpected way.’
    • ‘She threw the dice, and got two fives and one four.’
    • ‘How can you load the dice in your favor?’
    • ‘One Mozart manuscript actually includes what might be considered a musical game, though not played with dice.’
    1. 1.1mass noun A game played with dice.
      • ‘The definition of statistical independence appears in this book together with many problems with dice and other games.’
      • ‘A traditional Inuit game similar to dice is played on a board, using pieces in the shape of miniature people and animals.’
      • ‘It was a safe bet that as soon as Max and I were out of sight they would be back to their game of dice.’
      • ‘So much can turn on a game of dice: kingdoms have been lost, wives gambled away.’
      • ‘A half-dozen men play dice games while a woman upstage pours and serves their tea.’
      • ‘He is a simpleton and he loves a game of dice.’
      • ‘Another origin dates from the time of the Crusaders, who played a game of dice named after their place of encampment, the castle Hasart.’
      • ‘Police stormed the residence and found 11 enthusiastic people noisily engaged in a rowdy game of dice.’
      • ‘A second widely held belief is that the phrase comes from the game of dice, suggesting a poor player wasn't any good because his ‘shakes’ were not effective enough.’
      • ‘‘Life is just one big dice game’ according to Ray Doyle and Kevin Legend, founders of the Dice camp.’
      • ‘All I can say is that it's like a game of dice; sometimes you win and sometimes you lose.’
      • ‘The emphasis was on the game of dice, which evoked political intrigues beyond the barriers of time and place.’
      • ‘I'm also a big fan of Einstein, who said God does not play dice with the universe.’
      • ‘Grinning I stood and walked over to where men were playing a game of dice.’
      • ‘Next time, we will turn you over to Nono for a game of dice.’
      • ‘When, after political struggles and a decision to divide the kingdom, Yudhihira lays claim to universal kingship, Duryodhana challenges him to a game of dice.’
      • ‘Following his study of the game of dice, he became known as the founder of the theory of probabilistics.’
      • ‘Card games, dice and chess were the methods he used to make a living.’
      • ‘They have just finished their 12-year exile in the forest after losing the game of dice and are about to enter the phase of having to live in disguise.’
      • ‘Perform your ablutions, bathe, eat, drink, play dice and other games, sleep - all on the chariot.’
  • 2Small cubes of food.

    ‘cut the meat into dice’
    • ‘Early settlers, unused to such large marine creatures, cut them into dice called mootjies and simmered them with onions.’
    • ‘Wash, core and cut at least 5 pounds of ripe tomatoes into large dice.’
    • ‘We have changed the approach to incorporate tiny dices of pineapple in a mixture of cucumber and flakes of hot smoked salmon.’

verb

  • 1dice withno object Play or gamble with dice.

    • ‘He looked over at his fellow guards and saw them in the corner, dicing and conversing good-naturedly.’
    • ‘Four years older than John Peter of Bowhay, and seven older than Will, he was a bon vivant fond of dining and dicing: a suitable escort for his country cousins in Europe's most populous city.’
    • ‘Six hands at an open door dicing for pieces of silver,’
    dice with, court, risk, not be afraid of, treat frivolously, make light of
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1dice with Take risks with; run the risk of.
      ‘his side continue to dice with disaster’
      ‘you are dicing with an unknown problem’
  • 2with object Cut (food or other matter) into small cubes.

    ‘dice the peppers’
    ‘diced onions’
    • ‘Here, sweet red peppers are diced and sautéed with onions and garlic, combined with tomatoes and served as a soup with a raft of golden, fried feta cheese.’
    • ‘Chopped / diced vegetables of your choosing (always depends what we have in the fridge).’
    • ‘Remove saucepan and throw in chopped parsley & diced tomato, stirring through.’
    • ‘Knives are usually unnecessary at table as meat is diced or sliced in preparation.’
    • ‘Remove shank meat from bone and dice; peel veal tongue and thinly slice; remove outer membrane from sweetbreads and dice.’
    • ‘Blend a six-ounce can of tuna, one diced tomato, one tablespoon of fat-free Italian dressing and one tablespoon of minced green olives.’
    • ‘When I say to dice the tomato and onion, I mean they should be too small for stir fry, but still big enough to see what they are.’
    • ‘Cut the cauliflower into small florets and peel and dice the carrots.’
    • ‘Diced potatoes and onions were then added and cooked some more.’
    • ‘After dicing the carrots, onions, and celery and adding them to the broth of duck, Mr. Bishop set out a bowl and saucer and glass of water when suddenly he was interrupted by a knocking on the door.’
    • ‘While everything cooks, wash and chop the parsley, dice the ham, toast the hazelnuts in a dry skillet and chop them roughly.’
    • ‘Now just use a spoon to scoop out your sliced or diced avocado.’
    • ‘In a medium bowl, whisk together the egg whites, small diced carrots, onion, and celery.’
    • ‘He makes us slice and dice these vegetables over and over.’
    • ‘Melt fat, dice vegetables and place all ingredients in a wide heavy based saucepan.’
    • ‘Dress the leaves, then add the drained, diced apples, walnuts and crumbled cheese, gently mixing so they are evenly distributed.’
    • ‘She went back into the kitchen and watched Skinny dice a potato into a dozen pieces.’
    • ‘Why did I have to dice tomatoes while she easily chopped away on lettuce?’
    • ‘I don't want any Jell-O at my wedding, or diced carrots for that matter.’
    • ‘Fry over a moderate heat while you peel and finely dice the onions, carrots and celery.’
    chop, cut up, slice, cube, mince
    View synonyms
  • 3Australian dated, informal with object Reject or abandon.

    ‘he'd better behave, or I'll dice him’

Usage

Historically, dice is the plural of die, but in modern standard English dice is both the singular and the plural: throw the dice could mean a reference to either one or more than one dice

Phrases

  • dice with death

    • Take serious risks.

      • ‘People who drink alcohol and swim in North Yorkshire's rivers and lakes are dicing with death, police divers have warned.’
      • ‘After the accident last October concern was raised that children as young as nine were dicing with death on the Parkway by playing ‘chicken’ in the fast-moving traffic.’
      • ‘Pensioners who have to dodge dual-carriage way traffic to catch a bus are dicing with death, a county councillor has claimed.’
      • ‘Children are dicing with death hitching rides on the back of moving vehicles.’
      • ‘Skateboarders grabbing on to the back of moving buses are dicing with death.’
      • ‘Dozens of youngsters are dicing with death by leaping 80 ft from bridges into the waters of Salford Quays to cool down during the heatwave.’
      • ‘Young people do not appreciate that taking Ecstasy is dicing with death.’
      • ‘We're usually taking calculated risks and even dicing with death at times!’
      • ‘Speeding motorists on West Yorkshire roads are dicing with death by driving on the wrong side of the road in an attempt to dodge speed cameras instead of slowing down.’
      • ‘Men buy Harley Davidson motorbikes and dice with death on the roads.’
  • no dice

    • informal Used to refuse a request or indicate that there is no chance of success.

      • ‘He went to his jeep to call his commander, then came back and told me no dice.’
      • ‘The district court said no dice, and the D.C. Circuit agreed in an incredibly short (4 pages, including heading material) opinion.’
      • ‘He works with Debbie Harry and I tried to pry some stories about her out of him, but no dice.’
      • ‘He's gotten calls about a potential film adaptation since Ghost World and American Splendor did well, but so far no dice.’
      • ‘But a little box popped up on screen telling me no dice.’
      • ‘If it is polyester or acetate peau de soie, no dice.’
      • ‘Well, DJ wanted an amp, but the one he picked out was $400, so no dice.’
      • ‘Max kindly but firmly said no dice, the class is full and that's it.’
      • ‘Olaf wanted his name taken off the picture afterward, but no dice.’
      • ‘I've tried asking about the pics of kids and animals at the desk; no dice.’
  • roll (or throw) of the dice

    • A risky attempt to do or achieve something.

      ‘the merger was their last roll of the dice, and it failed miserably’
      • ‘Back in 1997, when the idea was first mooted, Sex and the City was seen as a roll of the dice for Parker, then heading for her mid-30s. No one expected its enduring popularity.’
      • ‘This looks like the last roll of the dice from the political dinosaurs and they just rolled a two.’
      • ‘The reality is that with another loss we won't be able to make the finals this year, so this match really is the last roll of the dice.’
      • ‘Still, as with every form of meet-and-greet, it's a roll of the dice whether you'll want to continue past that first date.’
      • ‘The family have suffered 28 years of false promises and crushed hopes and now April is convinced this appeal is the last roll of the dice.’
      • ‘So why was I about to risk losing everything with one compulsive, libidinous roll of the dice?’
      • ‘Well, it's mainly a roll of the dice, but it's also some sort of instinct.’
      • ‘Ignoring the strikers on his bench, he threw a centre-half into battle instead in one last desperate roll of the dice.’
      • ‘For McCain, it would also be the ultimate gamble, an all-or-nothing roll of the dice to determine the last chapter of his political career.’
      • ‘An extra minutes play was signalled and in one last effort Laois threw their last roll of the dice.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French des, plural of de (see die).

Pronunciation

dice

/dʌɪs/