Definition of diamond in English:

diamond

noun

  • 1A precious stone consisting of a clear and colourless crystalline form of pure carbon, the hardest naturally occurring substance:

    [as modifier] ‘a diamond ring’
    • ‘The higher demand for rough diamonds stems from the decline in the stock of polished diamonds at cutting centres.’
    • ‘Just think the only difference between the graphite in your pencil and diamonds is the way that the atoms are arranged.’
    • ‘Americans buy 55 % of the world's diamonds compared with 3 % that go to Britain.’
    • ‘Industry sources warn that diamond and precious stone scams are plentiful and ever-changing.’
    • ‘Once they are mined, cut and polished, diamonds are customarily graded.’
    • ‘Then again, diamonds are way more expensive because diamonds are natural gemstones that are rare and are mined from the earth itself.’
    • ‘The hardest stones, such as diamonds, rubies, emeralds, and sapphires, are normally cut and polished and mounted as jewellery.’
    • ‘Gemstones such as diamonds, opals, sapphires, and rubies are produced in Brazil.’
    • ‘In mining for precious stones such as diamonds, a method for accurately filtering the gems you want from the surrounding rock and soil is worth its weight in gold.’
    • ‘De Beers mines about 40 percent of the world's diamonds.’
    • ‘Historically, mining - especially for precious gems such as diamonds - played a large role in Liberia's economy.’
    • ‘Turn-of-the-century jewelry both here and abroad was dominated by faceted precious stones, with diamonds predominant.’
    • ‘Daly presented her with a 5-carat marquis diamond ring.’
    • ‘In clear substances such as diamond and corneal tissue, most electrons are locked up in chemical bonds.’
    • ‘Long-term prospects are overshadowed by the prospects of a leveling off in diamond mining production.’
    • ‘She was wearing a black pants suit and heels, with two diamond stud earrings.’
    • ‘Boucheron won the day, and will be auctioning an exquisite brooch of diamonds, rock crystal, topaz and emeralds, with the cash donated to the new foundation.’
    • ‘The grains, however, would have to be made up of a crystalline form of carbon: diamonds.’
    • ‘"We have a zero-tolerance attitude towards conflict diamonds ", the President said.’
    • ‘The country is also blessed with plenty of precious minerals such as diamonds, gold, emeralds, amethyst which are all waiting to be exploited.’
    diamond, precious stone, jewel
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A tool with a small diamond for cutting glass.
      • ‘They are normally used as industrial abrasives, in diamond drilling equipment, or in glass cutting knives.’
      • ‘In a common hardness test, a pyramid-shaped diamond tool is pressed into a material, as in this gold sample.’
      • ‘One of these was a diamond crusted circular saw for cutting rocks.’
      • ‘The appropriate mathematical function of the asphere must simply be loaded into the control system for the diamond tool to follow as it cuts across the surface.’
      • ‘Can't cut it with any of our tools, even the diamond laser, without completely shattering it beyond use.’
      • ‘It's body rocked slightly with the force of the faery's movement, it's black marbled eyes boring into Peter with all the intensity of a diamond tipped drill.’
      • ‘He then used a handheld planetary polishing tool with diamond cutting pads to put a high grit finish on the surface.’
    2. 1.2a diamondBritish informal An excellent or very special person or thing:
      ‘Fred's a diamond’
  • 2[often as modifier] A figure with four straight sides of equal length forming two opposite acute angles and two opposite obtuse angles; a rhombus:

    ‘a sweater with a pale-blue diamond pattern’
    • ‘His grey polyester slacks have white diamond shape imprints from leaning against the dusty fence.’
    • ‘When cold, cut the kiribath into diamond shapes.’
    • ‘Eriksson's midfield diamond formation did not sparkle against Japan, with Frank Lampard looking unsuited to the holding role.’
    • ‘Holes were drilled in a diamond pattern every 12 to 15 inches.’
    • ‘A ForceFlex bag looks a bit like an overgrown paper towel, with row upon row of embossed diamond shapes.’
    • ‘Score the inner side in a diamond pattern with the tip of a small, sharp knife and then cut into 5cm / 2inch squares.’
    • ‘Do it diagonally in both directions, to make diamond shapes.’
    • ‘On our way out of the park again though we saw a cordoned off area of the park, with yellow and black striped tape tied between four trees in a diamond configuration.’
    • ‘When he first struck in Heywood, Rochdale, he was wearing a blue fleece with yellow patches on the shoulders and a fawn crew-necked sweater with a diamond pattern.’
    • ‘On the roof, grey Marley tiles were set in diamond pattern.’
    • ‘Blast II is a cluster of elongated diamond shapes in two colors of painted softwood that fan out irregularly from a point on the wall.’
    • ‘The striking blue diamond shape that dominates the poster is inspired by the cluster of six pyramid-like buildings that comprise the museum complex.’
    • ‘Take a look at the most commonly available diamond shapes and decide what you like best.’
    • ‘She looked overhead and noticed on top of the clock tower, a giant crystal, not as round or red as the one the ship, but a triangular blue diamond shape.’
    • ‘The earliest item is a Viking bronze sword pommel from the late tenth century incised with diamond shapes and simplified animal forms.’
    • ‘Hang tiles in a more original way than squarely - perhaps in diamond shapes or with a patterned one here and there.’
    • ‘The basic pattern of external eye muscles is a diamond shape.’
    • ‘Forward for midfielder, and Larsson goes to the point of a midfield diamond.’
    • ‘When trying to widen a space, square tiles should be laid in a diamond pattern and rectangular tiles should be laid in a brick or herringbone pattern.’
    • ‘This painting consists of circles and diamond shapes interspersed throughout the composition.’
    rhombus, diamond shape, diamond
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1diamonds One of the four suits in a conventional pack of playing cards, denoted by a red diamond.
      • ‘Each partnership is allowed to have a sustem of agreements on how they will sort the cards of their hands - for example spades on the right and hearts on the left side and clubs and diamonds in the middle.’
      • ‘For example, playing the queen of hearts indicates to your partner that you have a strong diamonds.’
      • ‘This is an announcement that the declarer will win the last trick with the lowest trump - the 7 in a suit contract or the jack of diamonds in a Grand.’
      • ‘This deuce can represent any card value 7-10 in the diamond suit only.’
      • ‘This straight can be of mixed suits, for example: 2 of diamonds, 3 of clubs, 4 of spades, 5 of hearts.’
      • ‘When the reserve cards are equal the suits rank in descending order: spades, hearts, diamonds, clubs.’
      • ‘There are four suits (spades, hearts, diamonds and clubs); however, no suit is higher than another.’
      • ‘The holder of the three of diamonds adds this extra card to their hand.’
      • ‘This is a valid tractor because four in a suit other than diamonds is the next rank above ace.’
      • ‘The classic order of suits is hearts above diamonds, and spades above clubs.’
      • ‘One recent day, search crews found an ace of diamonds playing card, a doorknob, a pair of security guard pants, a woman's black wig and a pink toothbrush.’
      • ‘The point is won by whichever team takes more cards of the coins suit (or diamonds if you are using international cards).’
      • ‘In the game Pusoy Dos, played in the Philippines, the order of suits from high to low is diamonds, hearts, spades, clubs.’
      • ‘If the led card is the 6, you may play any card you wish, being void in the diamond suit and thus unable to follow it.’
      • ‘Therefore the ace of diamonds is the lowest card of its suit when diamonds are not trumps.’
      • ‘The familiar suits of hearts, diamonds, clubs and spades were introduced by French cardmakers in the late fifteenth century.’
      • ‘The dealer plays Jack of diamonds (the trump suit) to win control of the circuit.’
      • ‘While you are playing hombre and diamonds are trumps, the ace of clubs is not a club, it is a diamond.’
      • ‘Because of the difference in score, clubs and diamonds are called the minor suits and hearts and spades are the major suits.’
      • ‘This is because the highest trump is the opposite of the flipped up card (opposite of hearts is diamonds and the opposite of spades is clubs).’
    2. 2.2 A card of the suit of diamonds:
      ‘she led a losing diamond’
      • ‘Regardless of the suit a joker played ‘high’ will defeat any diamond.’
      • ‘The six cards in each fail suit are ranked like the six lowest diamonds.’
  • 3The area delimited by the four bases of a baseball field, forming a square shape.

    • ‘There was also some square ones oddly enough resembling a baseball diamond… like the one bordering my property perhaps?’
    • ‘Walking over from his position at third base, Foy crossed the field toward the first base side of the diamond and delivered his own message to Tillotson.’
    • ‘Using a white substance, he drew an outline of a baseball diamond on his street level window.’
    • ‘The park also has four baseball diamonds but Niverville does not have a baseball program for children.’
    • ‘In fact, you might be surprised to find yourself throwing out some choice lines based on what happens on the baseball diamond, to the chagrin of your buddy sitting next to you.’
    • ‘Here and now, we enjoy some of the greatest players to ever step on a baseball diamond.’
    • ‘The playing area is delineated by two perpendicular lines that converge at the home plate, the focus point of the diamond made up of four bases - home, first, second and third.’
    • ‘I agree with the idea of having each one of the four buttons on the gamepad correspond to their respective bases on the baseball diamond.’
    • ‘The three-plus seconds it takes for a straight steal of home to unfold is by far the most adrenaline-filled spectacle on a baseball diamond.’
    • ‘Field of Dreams tells the story of a baseball diamond created in a cornfield by Ray Kinsella.’
    • ‘Like Thome, Butler is going to make the slide across the diamond to first base.’
    • ‘It was my home on the baseball diamond for 12 years, until my high school coach put me on the mound as a junior and made me a pitcher-outfielder my senior year.’
    • ‘The Mets would love to add Furcal, even though they would have to convince him to move to the right on the infield diamond and play second base.’
    1. 3.1 A baseball field.
      • ‘While in Boston he teamed up with Johnny Sain, another pitcher, and the two became one of the greatest duos ever to grace a baseball diamond.’
      • ‘Home run sluggers are certainly the gladiators of the baseball diamond.’
      • ‘Yes, there was - and not just on major league baseball diamonds.’
      • ‘My heroes were ballplayers, and every spare minute I had, and even some that I couldn't spare, were spent on the baseball diamond.’
      • ‘Along with his pluses on the baseball diamond, Matsui is sure to be a positive from a business perspective.’
      • ‘There's an area in front of the baseball diamonds and soccer fields for Frisbee golf.’
      • ‘Enter ABC skate shop and the baseball diamond at Tompkin's Square.’
      • ‘To rebuild the baseball diamond at Manzanar is to thank them for retaining their faith in this country, even when they had no reason to do so.’
      • ‘DeJesus can do just about everything on the baseball diamond, and even showed a power spike in the Arizona Fall League.’
      • ‘Baseball diamonds were bustling with activity all weekend as there were 44 registered teams competing.’
      • ‘We, like everyone else, have come to expect the extraordinary from Garciaparra on a baseball diamond.’
      • ‘The dozen or so who comprise the film crew rush around on the baseball diamond getting ready for the commercial they are about to shoot.’
      • ‘I lived only two blocks from high school and grammar school, and there were baseball diamonds and football fields.’
      • ‘He has bowled on the streets of New York and other cities, at outdoor fairs and festivals, and on baseball diamonds and other fields.’
  • 4[usually as modifier] A railway crossing in which two tracks cross over each other at an acute angle:

    ‘diamond crossings’
    • ‘This narrow and broad gauge diamond was possibly the only such crossing there was; certainly it was rare.’
    • ‘Up ahead the engine rumbles across the trestle and clatters over the crossing tracks at State Line diamond.’
    • ‘Beautiful restored depot with L shaped tracks on each side. There is a diamond where the tracks cross at a corner of the station.’
    • ‘This included the removal of the diamond at the crossing of the D.LT. and the Columbus Subdivision.’
    • ‘We crossed a diamond over another set of tracks at Baldwin.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French diamant, from medieval Latin diamas, diamant-, variant of Latin adamans (see adamant).

Pronunciation

diamond

/ˈdʌɪ(ə)mənd/