Definition of diachronistic in English:

diachronistic

adjective

  • See diachronic

    • ‘It considers work in progress in the field of diachronistic linguistics, providing a snapshot of the discipline at the time the conference was held.’
    • ‘One might, for instance, have considered the changing popularity of biblical (as opposed to hagiographical or even secular) imagery in general, assessed diachronistic patterns in the relative popularity of individual subjects, and examined the iconographic evolution of particularly important ones.’
    • ‘The objects selected for reconstruction are ‘physical realities’ originating from different periods in time and are brought together in a diachronistic situation linked by the processes of research, production and placement (this differs from a merely curatorial practice).’
    • ‘The diachronistic but yet synchronistic observation of different political structures (from states and empires of the antiquity via India to the United States of America) makes it clear that constitution is much more than a body of laws and that a national community is never a mere community of law but always a community of values too.’

Pronunciation

diachronistic

/dʌɪˌakrəˈnɪstɪk/