Definition of detract in English:

detract

verb

  • 1detract fromno object Diminish the worth or value of (a quality or achievement)

    ‘these quibbles in no way detract from her achievement’
    • ‘Breeders of dogs whose tails are docked for cosmetic purposes say a ban would detract from the visual attraction of certain types.’
    • ‘The cups must be free of any defects that would detract from their appearance or affect their performance.’
    • ‘Here, the backgrounds are obtrusive and detract from the rest of the action.’
    • ‘But that can't detract from a fine performance by Collins who dug in and fought to the end.’
    • ‘There are not many places where you can get into conversation about how to detract from the value of the local housing.’
    • ‘All of these signs should be accommodated on one post and thus not detract from the beauty of the surroundings.’
    • ‘These combine to detract from the beauty of love in its pristine state.’
    • ‘The validity and relevance of some of this ancillary material is questionable and this potentially detracts from the value of the work, overall.’
    • ‘This is not to detract from his status as The World's Greatest Actor.’
    • ‘This had a subtle blend of flavours so as not to detract from the delicate-tasting prawns which were in plentiful supply.’
    • ‘As a result, the case is being made that money spent to minimise risk does not detract from shareholder value, but protects it.’
    • ‘And doing the rounds in one day certainly did not detract from the quality of the gifts.’
    • ‘The weak jokes should not, however, detract from the seriousness of the issue.’
    • ‘Even a couple of wooden performances don't detract from its appeal.’
    • ‘Only the garish turquoise silk tie and the glint in his pale blue eyes detract from this picture of geriatric gentlemanliness.’
    • ‘Choose a design that fits in with the style and scale of your home, otherwise you could detract from its value and end up living in a fortress.’
    • ‘The low correlation value is therefore explicable and does not detract from the findings.’
    • ‘Stylised fantasy environments can work, but here they feel cheap and persistently detract from the film itself.’
    • ‘His unusual creative process doesn't seem to detract from the final product.’
    • ‘But that should not detract from what was an excellent all-round performance from the home side.’
    belittle, take away from, diminish, reduce, lessen, minimize, lower, make light of, play down, discount, soft-pedal, brush aside, gloss over, trivialize, decry, depreciate, denigrate, devalue, devaluate, deprecate
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    1. 1.1with object Take away (a specified amount) from the worth or value of a quality or achievement.
      ‘it is detracting nothing from his ability to say that he owed the championship to a superior car’
      • ‘It adds and detracts nothing to the formula while being intended as little more than homage to a genre.’
      • ‘Well, most of the time it is, but the occasional lapse into fairly standard old-school hardcore detracts little from a record bursting with focused energy.’
      • ‘Far from having the character of final coda, the added six months would, if he got them, be anticlimactic, detracting a bit from the beauty of his life as a whole.’
      • ‘It detracts a little from the level of realism but after a while you forget about it.’
      • ‘Today the oil money adds or detracts nothing from the intensity of this celebration.’
      • ‘Nothing in the voicemail adds or detracts anything from the written consent or to the recorded contemplation of the parties at the time in respect of adversity.’
      • ‘But this should not detract greatly from the importance of Berger's larger points.’
      • ‘As the proprietor of a project that heavily relies on FIR, I receive a consistent volume of email detracting the method.’
      • ‘The beauty of it all is that neither a limited budget nor a skimpy rehearsal period detracted a jot from the occasion's powerful and memorable impact.’
      • ‘As with all great bands, such archaeology doesn't detract one iota, but allows us to indulge in a kind of aural watch repairing.’
      • ‘Such criticisms hardly detract much from his singular truthfulness.’
      • ‘The absence of such a discussion detracts somewhat from the book's overall contribution.’
      • ‘Both courses are extensively landscaped, detracting a bit from the natural setting.’
      • ‘Kalyan said in a statement that the minister's statement had been a ‘smokescreen aimed at detracting government's feeble track record to date in handling the epidemic’.’
      • ‘And in a true testimony to the power of the narrative, knowledge of the eventual outcome detracts nothing from the exhilarating story.’
      • ‘And thinking about it that does detract somewhat from his achievement.’
      • ‘The criterion for success was a polity which detracted least from the pretensions of a sovereign nation to manage its own affairs; reasons for failure can be found largely in the historical burdens carried by all those polities.’
      • ‘We have had to display a lot more than our own hand-made goods, which does detract a bit from our crafting origins, but we are determined to make a go of it.’
      • ‘There are some graphical problems, and the AI sucks, but that doesn't detract much from the fun of it.’
      • ‘The fact Colin never won Olympic gold does not detract one bit from his achievements.’
  • 2detract someone/something fromwith object Cause someone or something to be distracted or diverted from.

    ‘the complaint was timed to detract attention from the ethics issue’
    ‘the role did not include operational responsibilities that would detract him from his work’
    • ‘Let me also say that my motive is not to detract attention from the noble few who set examples on which we can draw.’
    • ‘The pain momentarily stunned him but not enough to detract his attention from her.’
    • ‘Whatever the method, one can only assume that she successfully detracts attention away from her face.’
    • ‘At 15 tracks long, Sound Of The Underground does seem drag on towards the end but don't let that detract you from the fact that this really is an impressive debut.’
    • ‘Icann said the lawsuit was an attempt to detract attention from its upcoming meeting in Vancouver.’
    • ‘Sets and costumes are simple yet adequate but this should not detract you from acquiring this competitively priced package that offers an outstanding performance.’
    • ‘One way of hiding the leaves is to grow the bulbs near or through other plants that will provide cover or detract the eye.’
    • ‘Maybe it's because titles mean detracting attention from the music itself.’
    • ‘‘Bad’ diction is really speech that calls attention to itself, detracting the listener's attention from what is being said.’
    • ‘Further, the developing countries did not want environmental issues to unduly detract them from the primary task of development and eradication of poverty.’
    • ‘The allegations would have detracted me from my election campaign.’
    • ‘But she stresses the short lifespan of a football career should not detract girls from getting involved in the sport.’
    • ‘This is to detract the attention of the people from the terrible times in Rome.’
    • ‘The terraced landscaping on the entrance from the Tullow Road detracts the eye from some poor rear boundaries to dwellings on this entrance.’
    • ‘The best policy is to put money into exterminating the disease and nothing must detract us from this.’
    • ‘No worldly temptation was enough to detract him from the ultimate aim of human life.’
    • ‘De Lorean succeeded by projecting a glorious vision of the future which detracted policy makers' attention from their dry but prescient statistical analyses.’
    • ‘But these should not detract us from enjoying a book that, even if at times quite demanding, will enhance our understanding of numbers and make us appreciate their history.’
    • ‘Concentration on fluctuations in oil prices has detracted attention from the fundamental changes occurring in world oil and gas markets.’
    • ‘Others say she is detracting attention from the presidential hopeful, which could cost him the Oval office.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin detract- ‘drawn away’, from the verb detrahere, from de- ‘away from’ + trahere ‘draw’.

Pronunciation

detract

/dɪˈtrakt/