Definition of dependency culture in English:

dependency culture

noun

  • A way of life characterized by dependency on state benefits.

    • ‘This electoral demography provides an unassailable base for a dependency culture that dominates the political process.’
    • ‘Another new analysis, carried out by Glasgow City Council, shows that Glaswegians are trapped in a dependency culture.’
    • ‘Some social watchers believe it's creating a dependency culture rather than independently-oriented teenagers, where ‘Mummy and Daddy will provide indefinitely’.’
    • ‘We are trying to move them away from the dependency culture and help encourage these people to be self-sufficient.’
    • ‘The extent of the country's dependency culture has been revealed with research showing 70% of working-age people in one of the country's most deprived areas are receiving state benefits for ill health.’
    • ‘It points up the country's continuing dependency culture which afflicts all social classes, namely that wherever there is a problem we tend to look to government or someone/something else to deliver the solution or change.’
    • ‘Though they have nothing they contrive, somehow, to keep their self respect, the very antithesis of the dependency culture which has grown up in our own country.’
    • ‘Donors are left frustrated by the failure of interventions to achieve desired goals and by the growth in affected regions of a dependency culture that saps economic and cultural strength.’
    • ‘But, for business, the issue is how the enterprise culture can displace the dependency culture.’
    • ‘It creates a high dependency culture that tends to undermine local economic growth and threaten local services.’
    • ‘But prevalent opinion had it that the poor law had been a bad thing for England, encouraging the growth of a dependency culture.’
    • ‘Far from rolling back the state, privatisation institutionalises the corporate dependency culture.’
    • ‘The 1996 federal welfare reform law struck a massive blow against the dependency culture.’
    • ‘The subsidy system is mainly based on how much land or how many animals you have and it has created a dependency culture.’
    • ‘These observations are painfully correct, as are the concerns raised about our dependency culture and the class-war scores undertaken by too many of our politicians.’
    • ‘He further reckoned that the allocation of land with so much financial support from the state was creating a dependency culture and ‘takes away initiative’ in the farming community.’
    • ‘Yet the contrary twin to this dependency culture is a growing desire to become self-reliant.’
    • ‘The important thing was to get the community on board because we don't want to create a dependency culture.’
    • ‘However an inability to let go of our hopes and desires leads men to seek artificial solutions from the pharmaceutical industry, breeding a dangerous and risk-laden drug dependency culture.’
    • ‘Yet the same government also fuelled the dependency culture with its incapacity benefits system.’