Definition of departure in English:

departure

noun

  • 1[mass noun] The action of leaving, especially to start a journey.

    ‘the day of departure’
    [count noun] ‘she made a hasty departure’
    • ‘Needless to say Sally wasn't too impressed about my hasty departure.’
    • ‘The detour or departure from this journey is usually short lived once the map is drawn.’
    • ‘On the day of departure the team received a cheque for $3,500 the result of fundraising on their base.’
    • ‘Their approach may have triggered the thief's hasty departure, said Wade.’
    • ‘After the hasty departure of the two members of the Special Branch, we heard nothing from Scotland Yard for almost two days.’
    • ‘After Mr Weaver's departure the council launched a pay review in a bid to stop directors leaving.’
    • ‘About 30 minutes later I questioned my hasty departure and returned to check out the price.’
    • ‘Their departure was apparently prompted by policy disagreements.’
    • ‘Most airlines advise passengers to arrive at the airport two hours before your flight's scheduled departure.’
    • ‘The Bahamas Spirit originally arrived at the terminal last week, but her departure was delayed for engine repairs.’
    • ‘The trip was slow because we had to wait for the real departure.’
    • ‘Lynette had spotted Agravaine shortly after the departure of Gwyneth and Gaheris to Orkney.’
    • ‘In the Oberoi Flight Services kitchen, food is cooked eight hours in advance of flight departure.’
    • ‘There is a perception that buying foreign currency at the airport departure lounge can be expensive.’
    • ‘Many survivors said the fire began about 90 minutes after departure, but the ship kept going.’
    • ‘From arrival to departure, the friendship and hospitality extended to Reg were overwhelming.’
    • ‘It's more about the lyrics of the record, which revolve around departure and going on to other things.’
    • ‘Rumours still swirl as to what precipitated the conductor's departure.’
    • ‘The departure lounge at Kirkwall was packed with enough local worthies to fill a jumbo jet.’
    • ‘We met several more of the LGMC boys waiting for departure and most of them are on our train so I'll head back once we get underway and catch up with them.’
    leaving, going, going away, going off, leave-taking, withdrawal, exit, egress, quitting, decamping, retreat, retirement, retiral
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[count noun]A deviation from an accepted, prescribed, or usual course of action.
      ‘the album is not a radical departure from the band's previous work’
      • ‘He said he was now hoping the negotiations for a new contract period would begin this year, which would be a departure from the past.’
      • ‘This is a departure from last year's event which was only open to business people under the age of thirty-five.’
      • ‘When the original hall was built, it was itself a departure from the medieval style of mansion and was the first manor house in the county made of brick and stone.’
      • ‘The College expansion will need approval because it is a departure from the 1956 Development Town Map.’
      • ‘Again, his views on immigration are a significant departure from the current orthodoxy within his own party.’
      • ‘In a departure from the norm, you are offered a choice of starters first, both non-vegetarian and vegetarian.’
      • ‘The first shift required is a departure from being concerned only with patients who are referred to outpatient clinics.’
      • ‘A diabetic diet need not mean a complete departure from a normal one; often, a few adjustments will suffice.’
      • ‘This is a major departure from the electoral procedures laid down by law.’
      • ‘Of course, this means a radical departure from current planning processes.’
      • ‘But on this occasion there was an astonishing departure from the routine.’
      • ‘In a complete departure from themes of popular culture, Coupland examines issues of loss, grief and faith.’
      • ‘That does seem to be a departure from the original plan.’
      • ‘But a departure from routine can be used effectively to signal political displeasure.’
      • ‘The story was a refreshing departure from the average narrative plot, while still remaining entertaining.’
      • ‘The idea may be a departure from the traditional ruthless image of investment banks, but Robey says it's no hollow promise.’
      • ‘And our new songs are a drastic departure from what we were doing before.’
      • ‘It was, of course, a huge departure from the tradition represented by Perkin.’
      • ‘We understand that this is a departure from our usual attitude.’
      • ‘He said building houses on the site was a minor departure from the original plans for good economic reasons and because of this should be approved.’
    2. 1.2Nautical
      The amount of a ship's change of longitude.
      • ‘Therefore, in plane sailing, the departure between two places is measured generally on that parallel of latitude which lies midway between the parallels of the two places.’
      • ‘Since a ship rarely sails for any length of time due east or due west, the difference in departure cannot ordinarily be found as in ordinary sailing.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French departeure, from the verb departir (see depart).

Pronunciation:

departure

/dɪˈpɑːtʃə/