Definition of democracy in English:

democracy

noun

mass noun
  • 1A system of government by the whole population or all the eligible members of a state, typically through elected representatives.

    ‘a system of parliamentary democracy’
    • ‘Yet in practice, liberal democracy should also allow for checks on government and limits to majority rule.’
    • ‘This is their chance to breathe new life into our system of Parliamentary democracy.’
    • ‘The whole direction of modern democracy is toward inclusion and equality of rights.’
    • ‘He forgets that democracy is a system in which the people choose their leaders.’
    • ‘In key respects this new politics represents a contest for democracy itself.’
    • ‘We condemn this decision, and appeal to all those who are on the side of democracy and freedom of the press to take a stand against it.’
    • ‘One of the major principles of democracy is that government is conducted by the people.’
    • ‘People asserted themselves to save democracy and the parliamentary system was restored.’
    • ‘Dictatorship was repudiated, and democracy accepted as a system of values.’
    • ‘Simple representative democracy in such a plural polity will no longer work.’
    • ‘I want to tell the people in the gallery that they are observers of our parliamentary democracy.’
    • ‘The example of Greek democracy seemed so much better in theory than in practice.’
    • ‘The politics of parliamentary democracy are not as monolithic as you represent them.’
    • ‘It will be interesting to see how the judge treats the dilemma between central control and local democracy.’
    • ‘Our system of democracy rests on the electorate being able to hold politicians accountable.’
    • ‘The history of the world is a history of systems: monarchy, oligarchy, democracy, what you will.’
    • ‘Representative democracy must mean that those who govern will fairly represent the governed.’
    • ‘Rousseau laid the basis for modern ideas of democracy and the legitimacy of majority rule.’
    • ‘The British system of representative democracy has always abhorred referendums on moral issues.’
    • ‘This is a serious development which could threaten free elections and representative democracy itself.’
    representative government, elective government, constitutional government, popular government
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1count noun A state governed under a system of democracy.
      ‘a multiparty democracy’
      • ‘In few democracies is government regarded with such suspicion and scepticism.’
      • ‘Unlike a legislative body in most democracies, the Council exercises significant executive powers.’
      • ‘So will our government work with other democracies to dismantle the tax havens?’
      • ‘Thanks to that, it is now virtually a pacifist country, and one of the most stable democracies in the world.’
      • ‘What rights do women and religious minorities actually exercise in these democracies?’
      • ‘Some changes in sovereignty have led to new forms of cooperation among the developed democracies in the North.’
      • ‘As has been said by quite a number of speakers today, our Parliament is one of the oldest true democracies.’
      • ‘Among the caucuses that the members of this community of democracies agreed to form, was one at the United Nations.’
      • ‘Countries with stable democracies today had to go through long and bitter civil wars.’
      • ‘Most of the democracies in Europe at the time had diverse nationalised industries.’
      • ‘Both are successful democracies with proud records on human rights.’
      • ‘Debate and criticism are the life blood of the democracies - both in Europe and America.’
      • ‘The House of Commons sits for more days and more hours than any other legislature in the large democracies.’
      • ‘I would be the last person to say that our current democracies are actually democratic.’
      • ‘International law is not as well-defined as national law in advanced democracies.’
      • ‘In most democracies, changing the constitution is the work of years.’
      • ‘In democracies, it is the press which puts manners on governments, not the other way around.’
      • ‘There can be and have been intolerant democracies and reasonably tolerant autocracies.’
      • ‘Freedom, then, is potentially but not automatically available to individuals in democracies.’
      • ‘The colonies were not democracies and the governors were not responsible to an electorate.’
    2. 1.2 Control of an organization or group by the majority of its members.
      ‘the intended extension of industrial democracy’
      • ‘The principle of elected controllers extends into every area of workers' democracy.’
      • ‘Well, that is what happens in a democracy, a majority vote, or there has to be some sort of a voting system.’
      • ‘You were voicing the will of the majority and in a democracy, that makes you right.’
      • ‘Many delegates were concerned about the implications for democracy of the new rule book.’
      • ‘In previous research, the author conducted a narrative examination of the literature on labor-managed firms to discover the nature of "organization democracy."’
      • ‘This provided an element of democracy and a basic structure of organisation.’
      • ‘Perhaps more important was the emphasis they placed on democracy and community organisation.’
      • ‘Most importantly, he argues, it lacked any real expansion of democracy or workers' control.’
      • ‘Even more important to the majority rule of democracy is how well we safeguard more vulnerable minorities.’
      • ‘I'm not a fan of direct democracy because I do not think that a majority vote on a single issue is the best way of going about things.’
      • ‘Even their own internal operating practices showed a lack of respect for democracy.’
      • ‘He has the total support of the majority and in a democracy such as ours that's all that matters.’
      • ‘Workplace democracy would be simple to organise but revolutionary in its effects.’
      • ‘Indeed their rulers have tried to eliminate those who stood for genuine workers' control and democracy.’
      • ‘A small majority has to be good for democracy and it will help to ensure fiscal stability.’
      • ‘My point being that part of democracy involves accepting the wishes of the majority, even if they are contrary to your own.’
      • ‘Even on the low level of a small group, students can practice democracy among themselves.’
    3. 1.3 The practice or principles of social equality.
      ‘demands for greater democracy’
      • ‘Real democracy demands social equality rather than merely the right to vote.’
      • ‘The real world of political economy sets the limits to democracy and equality.’
      • ‘These values include individualism, liberty, democracy and the rule of law.’
      • ‘The case is becoming a critical test of our justice system and our democracy.’
      • ‘The basis for genuine democracy is not toting guns, but achieving economic equality.’
      • ‘Equality is the absolute heart of our democracy: the right of all people to be treated equally.’
      • ‘It has been a commendable process, based on a belief in the principles of democracy and the rule of law.’
      • ‘In order to actually promote democracy, you have to promote social equality as well.’
      • ‘We are fighting for social rights and social justice, for democracy and against all forms of oppression.’
      • ‘It is a fight for democracy and social justice and it must be led in accordance with the law.’
      • ‘Graham cited values such as democracy, gender equality and respect for human rights.’
      • ‘The workshop will also show how the Internet and new technologies can be used to promote the spirit and practice of democracy.’
      • ‘Tocqueville saw the Revolution as the advent of democracy and equality but not of liberty.’
      • ‘Under such conditions, democracy, equality and political rights stood no chance.’
      • ‘They believed it would uphold the principles of democracy and social equality.’
      • ‘We live in the 21st century, the age of democracy and equality of opportunity.’
      • ‘As in the passage quoted above, he often uses equality of condition as a virtual synonym for democracy.’
      • ‘Women have seen this development as a backlash against equality and democracy.’
      • ‘Freedom of the press is one of the most important principles of any democracy.’
      • ‘In principle at least, democracy is committed to the equality of all individuals.’
      independence, self-government, self-determination, self-legislation, self rule, home rule, sovereignty, autonomy, autarky
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Origin

Late 16th century: from French démocratie, via late Latin from Greek dēmokratia, from dēmos ‘the people’ + -kratia ‘power, rule’.

Pronunciation

democracy

/dɪˈmɒkrəsi/