Definition of demand curve in English:

demand curve

noun

  • A graph showing how the demand for a commodity or service varies with changes in its price.

    • ‘That's why the demand curve, which is what this graph shows, slopes downward: because quantity demanded varies inversely with price.’
    • ‘I analyze this possibility by postulating that there is another demand curve that I call the latent demand curve.’
    • ‘If advertising does increase demand (that is, shift the demand curve upward and to the right), the firm will probably find it more profitable to raise prices than to lower them.’
    • ‘The short-run equilibrium price, the price that clears the market, is the price at which the demand curve and the short-run supply curve intersect.’
    • ‘If college students were to buy more tacos and ask for extra tomatoes on those tacos the demand curve would be moved in the appropriate direction, raising migrant workers wages.’
    • ‘However, giving the product away for free has only limited success, because the demand curve for most economic history doesn't seem to be very elastic.’
    • ‘The demand curve for all these services is also a moving target.’
    • ‘However, the position of the demand curve for labour can vary according to either the level of capital employed or the price of the output good.’
    • ‘The fact that the demand curve is downward sloping indicates that consumers are sensitive to prices offered by any one competing or monopoly operator.’
    • ‘Market demand sums the demand for advertising by all individual advertisers; everything else equal, when some firms stop buying, the market demand curve shifts to the left.’
    • ‘Economists use a demand curve to display water's worth to consumers (their willingness to pay).’
    • ‘Ask two or three kids how much beer they drink per week at today's prices, and how much they would drink at different prices, and then add them up for a market demand curve.’
    • ‘A demand curve for the stock can then be generated by ordering the market participants in terms of the maximum they would be prepared to pay for that stock.’
    • ‘The various willingness to pay positions are taken from an underlying demand curve that is not revealed to the students until after the experiment is completed.’
    • ‘However, the demand curve for these technologies, at least for the next several years, is headed upwards and at times has been nearly vertical.’
    • ‘What we have here is a classic demand curve and the demand curve is always downward-sloping, because the more you charge, the fewer people will be willing to buy your software.’
    • ‘As a result, investment plus consumer durables actually increased as a percent of GDP despite a clear-cut inward shift in the demand curve.’
    • ‘A change in the demand curve, however, can make for substantial price difference.’
    • ‘The demand curve - a pictorial representation of the quantity of goods and services demanded at any given price - is downward sloping.’
    • ‘The demand curve just goes up and up and outstrips California's ability to provide supply.’