Definition of delusion in English:

delusion

noun

  • 1An idiosyncratic belief or impression maintained despite being contradicted by reality or rational argument, typically as a symptom of mental disorder.

    ‘the delusion of being watched’
    • ‘Many are filled with hate and delusions of superiority; some are actually psychotic.’
    • ‘No talk show host or publisher invited them to share their delusions with the world.’
    • ‘In the paranoid form of this disorder, they develop delusions of persecution or personal grandeur.’
    • ‘In other words, this was another sensational example of what sociologists call collective delusions.’
    • ‘I think I mentioned somewhere that delusions are visions of realities not yet activated.’
    • ‘Such a grandiose delusion is common to the consideration of an insanity defense.’
    • ‘LSD can induce a psychotic state with paranoid delusions that can last for months.’
    • ‘He was a realistic man who harbored no delusions about immortality.’
    • ‘In some non-Western cultures, schizophrenic delusions single out the person as spiritually gifted.’
    • ‘Psychotic patients may have paranoid delusions about their food, leading to reduced intake.’
    • ‘He has grandiose delusions and does not want to stay in hospital.’
    • ‘Is this for real, or just a delusion on my part?’
    • ‘The doctors had been aware that he harboured violent delusions.’
    • ‘Narcissism is a noxious mental disease that leads people to grandiose delusions.’
    • ‘The rise of psychoanalysis did much to validate the contents of mental symptoms, including delusions.’
    • ‘Schizophrenia, a biological disorder of the brain, is characterised by delusions, hallucinations and thought disorders.’
    • ‘What did they call it when two people shared a delusion?’
    • ‘Is it all a mass delusion, or is there something to it all.’
    • ‘Psychotic delusions, say of being invincible, are a common element of mania.’
    misapprehension, mistaken impression, false impression, mistaken belief, misconception, misunderstanding, mistake, error, misinterpretation, misconstruction, misbelief
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    1. 1.1mass noun The action of deluding or the state of being deluded.
      ‘what a capacity television has for delusion’
      • ‘The rest of us play along, but no one is fooled by this necessary delusion.’
      • ‘This is one of the first steps he takes towards differentiating between delusion and fact.’
      • ‘What is deceit or delusion, and what is genuine in this movement?’
      • ‘The collapse of idea in Europe may yet be the event that will snap Britain awake from a 30-year delusion.’
      • ‘In short, the evidence points more towards hoaxing and delusion than real discovery.’
      • ‘It took me 15 years to realise that it was a tragic, sickly delusion.’
      • ‘So many of us live in a life of delusion, of separation, of selfishness and of loneliness.’
      • ‘Now mass delusion is not necessarily a bad thing.’
      deception, misleading, deluding, fooling, tricking, trickery, duping
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Phrases

  • delusions of grandeur

    • A false impression of one's own importance.

      • ‘The purpose of that story was to demonstrate that a well-known and well-respected public figure was actually nothing more than a mindless hack with delusions of grandeur.’
      • ‘Outing those with delusions of grandeur, paranoia, and entitlement is a tough job, but somebody's done a great job of it.’
      • ‘The patient entertains delusions of grandeur.’
      • ‘It is a pleasingly post-modern twist which Cervantes himself would have enjoyed, having written a book about absurd follies, delusions of grandeur and the deficit between fiction and reality.’
      • ‘I'm not sure what's worse: The naked, unapologetic corruption, or the insane delusions of grandeur.’
      • ‘They have managed to negotiate the multi-million pound sale of a player who is not proven at the highest level, seems to lack professionalism and appears to have delusions of grandeur.’
      • ‘Thankfully, during week one of the playoffs, it was revealed that all of my friends had fallen prey to similar delusions of grandeur.’
      • ‘In his book you'll read about his week in a travel agency, where, on his first day, he was conned into buying birthday lunch for a boss with serious delusions of grandeur.’
      • ‘If you have delusions of grandeur and fancy yourself to be intellectually superior, go on and impress those who are even more challenged than you are.’
      • ‘You have to guard against delusions of grandeur.’
      delusions of grandeur, obsessionalism, grandiosity, grandioseness
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Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘act of deluding or of being deluded’): from late Latin delusio(n-), from the verb deludere (see delude).

Pronunciation

delusion

/dɪˈluːʒ(ə)n/