Definition of degrees of frost in English:

degrees of frost

phrase

British
  • Degrees below freezing point.

    ‘he insisted on inspecting troops in 23 degrees of frost’
    • ‘The thermometer outside marked eighteen degrees of frost, and as the sun had not yet risen, the hunter hoped to surprise the animals at the approaches to the Wildstrubel, and Ulrich, being alone, remained in bed until ten o'clock.’
    • ‘A week last Monday, we were faced with a crisis at the collection centre when, at 6am, there was ten degrees of frost and no water could be persuaded to go down the pipes.’
    • ‘And you can bet that this winter when you read ‘there was ten degrees of frost in Kendal at the weekend,’ it will be Fahrenheit, which has been invoked for maximum effect.’
    • ‘In the depths of winter when there's snow on the ground, several degrees of frost and the rivers are in flood is the time to take a weekend off, not April, May and June.’
    • ‘Twelve degrees of frost had been recorded the previous night.’
    • ‘On the coldest night, 19 degrees of frost were recorded in York.’
    • ‘They suffered 50 degrees of frost in the frigid darkness of the long polar winter; in the summer, plagues of mosquitoes filled their eyes and throats.’
    • ‘On the 10th of September these ice-bound voyagers had eighteen degrees of frost, and the darkness had advanced on them so rapidly that it was dark about ten at night.’
    • ‘At Churchill an exposed thermometer registered 5.5 degrees F on Thursday morning, equal to 26.5 degrees of frost, and this was in a fairly sheltered position.’
    • ‘Given the plunging temperatures - they dropped to 18F on Christmas Day, or 14 degrees of frost - folk were seeking indoor entertainment.’