Main definitions of defect in English

: defect1defect2

defect1

Pronunciation /ˈdiːfɛkt//dɪˈfɛkt/

noun

  • A shortcoming, imperfection, or lack.

    ‘genetic defects’
    mass noun ‘the property is free from defect’
    • ‘No skid marks were found, he said, and both cars were free from defects.’
    • ‘She said the causes of the problem could be numerous, ranging from foot deformity to tissue defects.’
    • ‘A defect in this system may cause fluid retention and hypertension.’
    • ‘An accountant owes his sight to an optician who spotted a serious defect during a routine examination.’
    • ‘If their system is free of these defects, then it clearly is a superior system.’
    • ‘Such guarantees are given free of charge and promise that a product is free from defects in workmanship and materials.’
    • ‘Women in the region live in constant fear of bearing children with genetic defects.’
    • ‘Alterations in the p53 gene are the most common genetic defects known to occur in human tumours.’
    • ‘It was not a duty not to sell such a house nor was it a duty to warrant that all houses being sold by the local authority under the right to buy scheme were free of defects.’
    • ‘At the same time, our mind has the potential to become completely free of defects and limitations.’
    • ‘These toxins can damage immune systems, trigger cancers and cause genetic defects.’
    • ‘The transfer does the glossy animation justice by being clear and free of defects.’
    • ‘In other words, that would produce a much higher value diamond, and it would be freed of the defect which led to a crack.’
    • ‘Thirteen of the vehicles were served with defect notes and only 11 of all the coaches were free from any defects.’
    • ‘Today, kinked tails are thought to be undesirable genetic defects in show cats.’
    • ‘Regular vision check-ups can show a defect or a weakness that can usually be sorted if worked on.’
    • ‘Silicon for chip manufacture must be highly pure and free of defects in the crystalline packing of atoms.’
    • ‘On the other hand, it is free from serious defects and is a good choice in its price category.’
    • ‘Many suffer needlessly from eye defects due top lack of knowledge and basic equipment.’
    • ‘These abnormalities are caused by defects in the genes that tell the cells how to make collagen.’
    fault, flaw, imperfection, deficiency, weakness, weak point, weak spot, inadequacy, shortcoming, limitation, failing, obstruction
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (as a noun, influenced by Old French defect ‘deficiency’): from Latin defectus, past participle of deficere ‘desert or fail’, from de- (expressing reversal) + facere ‘do’.

Pronunciation

defect

/ˈdiːfɛkt//dɪˈfɛkt/

Main definitions of defect in English

: defect1defect2

defect2

verb

[no object]
  • Abandon one's country or cause in favour of an opposing one.

    ‘he defected to the Soviet Union after the war’
    • ‘In 1989, Zuyev was granted asylum in the USA after defecting from the Soviet Union in a MiG 29 and landing in Turkey.’
    • ‘When Germany failed to take Russia Stalin went after those émigrés who had defected to the German forces.’
    • ‘Some defected to the opposition, some began voting for other parties on the left and many simply stopped voting.’
    • ‘He's serving a 30-day sentence for abandoning his unit in 1965 and defecting to North Korea.’
    • ‘Between 600 and 800 soldiers have defected to create a new rebel group in the eastern part of the country.’
    • ‘That majority has eroded to a handful of seats over the past three years after several allies defected to the opposition.’
    • ‘I believe our great councillor before him would never have defected and become a turncoat.’
    • ‘Ieng Sary eventually defected to the government, helping end the long civil war.’
    • ‘Nothing untoward happened to the traitor until he upped sticks and defected to Moscow.’
    • ‘We have to add the risk of fines or jail into our calculations, and this may tip the balance in favour of cooperating rather than defecting.’
    • ‘His family defected from the Soviet Union when he was five.’
    • ‘This could almost be seen as defecting to the opposition.’
    • ‘According to the reports sent to them some of the residents of the station may have defected to the rebels.’
    • ‘Following the uprising, the son defected to London, where he headed a philanthropic group.’
    • ‘He was one of about ten people who defected in that direction.’
    • ‘Alibekov defected to the United States in 1992, changed his name, and made the talk-show circuit.’
    • ‘The standing army was in the process of disintegration as lower ranking officers defected to the opposition.’
    • ‘Managers for the candidates raced around the floor trying to pry delegates away from their opponents, and to keep those already on their side from defecting.’
    • ‘Corpus was a soldier who defected to the communist side in the 1970s.’
    desert, go over to the enemy, change allegiances, change loyalties, change sides, turn traitor, rebel, renege, abscond, go awol, quit, escape
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century: from Latin defect- ‘failed’, from the verb deficere (see defect).

Pronunciation

defect

/dɪˈfɛkt/