Definition of deduction in English:

deduction

noun

  • 1The action of deducting or subtracting something:

    ‘the dividend will be paid without deduction of tax’
    • ‘He paid £15,000 for the property, Briargate at Malahide Road, Swords, and the balance was taken through the deduction of estate agent fees.’
    • ‘Four years ago the Inland Revenue had a look at this automatic deduction of tax and estimated that over the past few years it had taken £300 million from four million people who should have paid no tax at all.’
    • ‘It would be appropriate to pay after deduction of tax.’
    • ‘The tribunal ruled the deductions from her wages were not unlawful.’
    • ‘It has dealt with, for example, shop trading hours in Kelly's Case, with the deduction of union dues in Alcan, with union badges in Archer's Case, and so forth.’
    • ‘A small screen on the turnstile shows that the deduction has been made.’
    • ‘The local Commissioners refused to accept the deduction of working charges and royalties.’
    • ‘The report was commissioned by the Tánaiste in December to examine the illegal charging of people in long-stay care in health board institutions through the deduction of pensions.’
    • ‘Historically, the main advantages of investing offshore have been that returns are paid without any deduction of tax, and the authorities in your home country are told nothing about your wealth.’
    • ‘Automatic bill payment eliminates overlooked bills and the deduction is automatic; there's no need to contact us each month.’
    • ‘Most people work fewer than 250 days a year after the deduction of weekends, holidays, vacations, and sick leave.’
    • ‘Though no cost standards are provided in the minutes, it is mentioned that the profit was calculated after the deduction from revenue of all manufacturing costs.’
    • ‘This confirms that the account holder is a non-taxpayer and allows interest to be received without the deduction of income tax.’
    • ‘This should be criminalised or the guilty party should be penalised through the deduction of votes, Sega newspaper reported.’
    • ‘All taxes fall on people, whether through deductions from income or in higher prices for goods and services.’
    • ‘But it is said by Mr. May that there is no evidence to support his conclusion or justify the deduction of 25%.’
    • ‘Such income will henceforth be taxed in the hands of the recipients at the rates applicable to them, and will be subject to tax deduction at source at the rate of 10%.’
    • ‘There is an important matter outstanding, in the shape of a Carrick appeal to the FAI against the deduction of three points in a game against Dungarvan.’
    • ‘But she will only receive a cheque for about £5,500 following the deduction of her own legal and medical costs.’
    • ‘In Gee v. the Queen, the deduction of management fees was disallowed essentially because of lack of documentation.’
    subtraction, taking away, taking off, withdrawal, abstraction, removal, debit, docking, discounting
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    1. 1.1[count noun] An amount that is or may be deducted from something, especially from taxable income or tax to be paid:
      ‘tax deductions’
      • ‘Tax regulations have gotten so complicated that it's easy to overlook valuable deductions and tax breaks.’
      • ‘Some states even allow their residents tax deductions for contributions made to the plan.’
      • ‘In order to qualify for fringe benefit tax deductions there should be an employer-employee relationship.’
      • ‘Thus this new format inevitably threatens the present system, in which employers get a tax deduction for financing pension funds for their workers.’
      • ‘Many states offer tax deductions to residents who invest with the home team.’
      • ‘Effectively, this would amount to a deduction from the total contribution sought.’
      • ‘Charitable tax deductions in effect make government a large donor to university endowments.’
      • ‘We're talking thousands of dollars in deductions against your tax liability.’
      • ‘Use the following chart as a guideline to determine if you are able to get a tax deduction for the amount you contribute.’
      • ‘Different tax allowances and deductions can be available, depending on the nature of the arrangement.’
      • ‘Allowable deductions include such things as insurance, cleaning, repairs and general maintenance costs.’
      • ‘After all, it's more than a tenth of the average income before deductions.’
      • ‘One of the benefits is that when you establish a trust, you get a tax deduction for the present value of the projected charitable gift.’
      • ‘She would have to itemize deductions on her tax returns and there are income limitations.’
      • ‘Hurley expects other states that offer big tax deductions to adopt similar provisions.’
      • ‘If you can't use other methods, minimise your tax by maximising your deductions, reliefs and tax credits.’
      • ‘You may be eligible for tax refunds, deductions or other benefits due to lost or damaged possessions or property.’
      • ‘A self-employed person can claim more deductions in calculating his income.’
      • ‘During the national election campaign, Mr. Klein boasted he'd open more private clinics and begin a tax deduction based on income to raise more revenue.’
      • ‘Income and social security deductions are only part of the picture.’
      stoppage, subtraction
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  • 2The inference of particular instances by reference to a general law or principle:

    ‘the detective must uncover the murderer by deduction from facts’
    Often contrasted with induction
    [count noun] ‘we do not yet know if these deductions are correct’
    • ‘And it certainly seems to follow from the fact that this deduction is possible that I could not have done this thing.’
    • ‘Secondly, he argues in favor of hypothesis and deduction, that is, in favor of Milne et al.’
    • ‘Albert is thus led to present a highly systematized theory of the forms of inference, which represents a major step forward in the medieval theory of logical deduction.’
    • ‘Patricia's deduction of this fact prompts a chain of realizations.’
    • ‘Schopenhauer calls this a logical or formal truth, meaning simply one whose ground is based on deduction, rather than observation.’
    • ‘In ordinary life it is rare indeed for people to form their beliefs by a process of logical deduction from facts ascertained by a rigorous search for all available evidence and a judicious assessment of its probative value.’
    • ‘The rules of deduction are rules of entailment, not rules of inference.’
    • ‘He disputed Gettier's claim that any deduction from a justified, but false, proposition preserves justification.’
    • ‘Rhetoric and dialectic rely on the same theory of deduction and induction.’
    • ‘You see, my sophisticated powers of deduction are unmatched.’
    • ‘No architect of these institutions has proceeded by deduction from general principles.’
    • ‘But it is perhaps truer of Spinoza than of his contemporaries that his enterprise was one of radical deduction from first principles.’
    • ‘The first principles of a science are not subject to deduction from more basic principles.’
    • ‘Given that this isn't even his field, it was a virtuoso performance of clarity and deduction from first principles.’
    • ‘The mathematician establishes results by logical deduction.’
    • ‘Aristotle gave a system of logical deduction which was seen as the ultimate form for reasoning for many centuries.’
    • ‘For one thing, it helps to explain how we come to know things via deduction.’
    • ‘The intellectual method that they adopted was not Cartesian deduction from abstract first principles, but induction, based on careful, scientific observation.’
    • ‘Proving was no longer a matter of transforming terms in accordance with rules, but a process of logical deduction from concepts.’
    • ‘Global learners, on the other hand, process information by deduction, reasoning from general conclusions or theories to predictions and explanations.’
    conclusion, inference, supposition, hypothesis, thesis, assumption, presumption, suspicion, conviction, belief
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Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin deductio(n-), from the verb deducere (see deduce).

Pronunciation:

deduction

/dɪˈdʌkʃ(ə)n/