Definition of decorous in English:

decorous

adjective

  • In keeping with good taste and propriety; polite and restrained.

    ‘Charlotte gave David a decorous kiss’
    • ‘Such a decorous manner of doing business is of course, oh so Edinburgh and oh so out of date.’
    • ‘The young woman's acceptance of the cigarette, indoors and among her friends, was a statement of mild daring; during her wedding and the following celebrations, she was suitably decorous.’
    • ‘My general feelings toward Hollywood have changed dramatically for the better after a decorous Academy Awards presentation last night.’
    • ‘Agatha, Apted's next film, is a much more decorous and gentle crime film, a fictionalised version of the disappearance of mystery writer Agatha Christie in 1926.’
    • ‘We're not just talking about a polite and decorous way to find a New Year's date in a matter of mere weeks.’
    • ‘Further in front, children receiving their First Communion displayed a mixture of decorous behaviour and occasional outbursts of cheerful chanting in praise of their hero.’
    • ‘In Tokyo's hothouse atmosphere decorous behaviour brought from home is jettisoned.’
    • ‘After all, she'd essentially refused to look him in the eye earlier, deciding to be proper and decorous instead of curious.’
    • ‘Consequently, women are expected to be decorous, modest, and discreet.’
    • ‘As she was singing - in a very decorous, quiet manner, in keeping with the Puritan distrust of the secular arts - her mother opened their back door.’
    • ‘If the result is a style that is overly mannered, decorous, cautious and middle-aged, then this is the price they pay for their infatuation.’
    • ‘Only after victory does he begin, clearly on the advice of his handlers, to adopt a more decorous manner.’
    • ‘The flag waving was decorous, the cheering polite and the umpire was never once insulted.’
    • ‘He then proceeded to eat his dinner using bread and his fingers in a decorous manner, much to my sons' delight and fascination.’
    • ‘Store policies reveal a concern with establishing an orderly social space in which workers and consumers engaged in decorous, purposeful transactions.’
    • ‘Reading this polished and sometimes decorous narrative, it is hard for the modern reader to see why it ever had such an impact.’
    • ‘‘It looks like a cowpat,’ said the decorous Englishman who ordered it, ‘but it tastes good.’’
    • ‘His personality seemed in harmony with his mild decorous manner but it hid totally unsuspected depths.’
    • ‘Some of the sadhus were distinctly scary - like the Aghoris with their bells and boar tusks and magic mantras, who insulted their amused but decorous Nepalese audience.’
    • ‘Those who are constantly ‘nice’, seemly and decorous, suppress their natural instincts.’
    proper, seemly, decent, becoming, befitting, tasteful, in good taste
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 17th century (in the sense ‘appropriate, seemly’): from Latin decorus ‘seemly’ + -ous.

Pronunciation

decorous

/ˈdɛk(ə)rəs/