Definition of décolletage in English:

décolletage

noun

  • 1A low neckline on a woman's dress or top.

    • ‘The suits are elegant, the hair high and the décolletages so precariously low that you know there's been a run on double-sided tape.’
    • ‘As snow descends upon our fair city and temperatures plunge lower than a cabaret singer's décolletage, our theatres, concert hall, dance studios, and clubs are hot with the fire of creativity.’
    • ‘Oxford student Chelsea Clinton, pictured recently cuddling with her boyfriend in a Venetian gondola and at a Paris fashion show with a deep décolletage and enough mascara to paint a fence, appears to be a girlie feminist.’
    • ‘Goitre was most noticeable in portraits from the 18th century, when décolletage was fashionable.’
    • ‘She thought wryly that had Lady Percy's dress had a centimeter less of décolletage, her breasts would spill out into Lord Beaumont's hands.’
    • ‘She arrived looking stunning in flared black linen trousers, kitten heels and a risqué décolletage.’
    • ‘Passing by a tall mirror that was framed in gold, Kathleen cast herself a glance: her décolletage was low as usual, and the wings of Renowyn could be seen peaking out from the low opening of her gown.’
    • ‘Off are the felted wool cloaks and headscarves, and on are gossamer skirts, tulle petticoats, lace bordering, sweeping décolletages, silk bows, and the rest of fripperiedom.’
    • ‘The countess was still breathing harshly, her bosom rising and falling, straining against her low décolletage.’
    • ‘Prudie thinks you should skip the décolletage and behave as though he were a favorite, fun cousin.’
    1. 1.1A woman's cleavage as revealed by a low neckline on a dress or top.

Origin

Late 19th century: French, from décolleter expose the neck, from dé- (expressing removal) + collet collar of a dress.

Pronunciation:

décolletage

/ˌdeɪkɒlɪˈtɑːʒ//deɪˈkɒltɑːʒ/