Definition of declaration in English:

declaration

noun

  • 1A formal or explicit statement or announcement:

    ‘a declaration of love’
    • ‘But will his declarations of love melt her icy heart?’
    • ‘We need an official declaration that we are innocent.’
    • ‘The king was told to demand that his brother-in-law renounce all treaties hostile to France and make public declaration of his peaceful intentions.’
    • ‘There were no maudlin declarations of love or anything of that sort…yet still it was made clear on both sides how important the other was and how much our time together meant.’
    • ‘She can't even look at him when he makes his declarations of love.’
    • ‘‘ANOTHER world is possible’ is the ringing declaration of the anti-capitalist movement.’
    • ‘Marriage and civil union, of course, have an explicit declaration of commitment and interdependence that may be missing in a de facto relationship.’
    • ‘He issued new declarations of love and promised to tell Ms. Turner about their relationship.’
    • ‘Eight months later, and following several declarations that he would not stand, Howard had become convinced that his time had finally come.’
    • ‘Now is probably not the time for declarations of aggressive intent.’
    • ‘My declaration at the press conference took everyone by surprise as I had not given any prior hints.’
    • ‘It seems he's decided to make up for lost time by backing up his first proposal with several very public declarations of his intentions.’
    • ‘Families have said they want a public declaration that the victims were innocent, and that surely will happen this time.’
    • ‘The elections were so clearly rigged that six of the main opposition parties made a joint declaration on election day denouncing electoral fraud and withdrawing their candidates.’
    • ‘This meeting was arranged following the sensational declaration by chairman John Stabler that the club had folded as of Tuesday night.’
    • ‘He made the declarations while responding to reporters' questions on the bilateral debt forgiveness agreement during yesterday's post-Cabinet news conference at Whitehall.’
    • ‘And his often-conflicting statements undermine the credibility of his public declarations.’
    • ‘I do not believe this to be true; common courtesy would demand at least a declaration of intent between the heads of the two departments chiefly involved.’
    • ‘But it will be months before Mr Imbert can make an impact on this vast ministry, his best intentions and hopeful declarations notwithstanding.’
    • ‘Despite his frequent declarations of love, the only qualities Russell seems to admire in Kay are her beauty, her sexuality, and her unobtainability.’
    announcement, statement, communication, pronouncement, proclamation, memorandum, bulletin, communiqué, dispatch, report, edict, manifesto
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    1. 1.1 The formal announcement of the beginning of a state or condition:
      ‘the declaration of war’
      • ‘Costa Rica joined other Central American provinces in 1821 in a joint declaration of independence from Spain.’
      • ‘The German-Soviet war in 1941 brought hopes of freedom and even a declaration of independence in western Ukraine.’
      • ‘Similarly, under a series of Supreme Court decisions, civilians cannot be court-martialed in the absence of a formal declaration of war.’
      • ‘In March 1990 a unilateral declaration of independence was made.’
      • ‘He sees today's offer as a declaration of war by the Federal Government.’
      • ‘February 24 is celebrated as Estonian Independence Day, marking the formal declaration of Estonian independence in 1918.’
      • ‘This was the closest the US ever came to a formal declaration of war.’
      • ‘Hitler's Polish campaign, and then the attack on the USSR, were launched without formal declarations of war.’
      • ‘Border clashes began in 1928 and in 1932, despite mediation efforts, full-scale war erupted, although formal declarations of war were not made until 1933.’
      • ‘By June 1776 their efforts had become hopeless and a committee was formed to compose a formal declaration of independence.’
      • ‘To that end, it was decided to mount a surprise attack on the Russian fleet, without a formal declaration of war.’
      • ‘The king's raising of his standard at Nottingham on 20 August was the formal declaration of war.’
      • ‘Here he received the backing of the duke of Burgundy, his brother-in-law, who was also threatened by a Franco-Lancastrian declaration of war.’
      • ‘On 14 April 1849 the Hungarians issued a formal declaration of independence and deposed the Habsburgs.’
      • ‘February 16 is Lithuanian Independence Day, marking the formal declaration of independence in 1918.’
      • ‘Johnson took King's attack as a declaration of war and responded in kind.’
      • ‘The Croatian declaration of independence, however, was met with a war that lasted into 1992.’
      • ‘The first Japanese attack took place after diplomatic relations had been broken off but before the formal declaration of war.’
      • ‘He was chief minister of Madras 1937-9, but resigned as part of Congress's protest against the British declaration of war against Germany on India's behalf.’
      • ‘At present, the declaration of a state of emergency must be renewed monthly by a parliamentary majority.’
      proclamation, notification, announcement, revelation, disclosure, broadcasting, promulgation
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    2. 1.2 A written public announcement of intentions or of the terms of an agreement:
      ‘all students must sign the following declaration’
      • ‘He requires that any journalist entering the country sign a declaration agreeing to report only on cricket and steer clear of politics.’
      • ‘For example, the Helsinki summit declaration envisions a multinational planning staff to collect information and make assessments.’
      • ‘The declaration was made public just two days before the newly ratified Treaty of Nice came into effect.’
      • ‘Thus, in 1933 Gadamer, along with other Marburg professors, signed a public declaration of allegiance to the National Socialist state.’
      • ‘As you pointed out, the United States was not explicitly mentioned in the summit declaration.’
      • ‘The declaration is an agreement signed by many colleges to carry out initiatives designed to promote environmentalism.’
      • ‘Mozer said that even though the party leaders did not sign a declaration or an agreement, it was very important that they had discussed their positions and relations.’
      • ‘He called on London and Dublin to stick by the terms of their joint declaration.’
      • ‘People must sign the declaration attached to the ballot paper or their vote will not be valid and will not be counted.’
      • ‘Before the breakdown, a draft declaration was issued to force member countries to cut farm subsidies.’
      • ‘The signing of the Rome declaration marks the beginning of a fundamentally new relationship between Russia and NATO.’
      • ‘They signed a joint declaration pledging to strengthen relations between their two countries and enhance cooperation in counter-terrorism.’
      • ‘Although he held four rounds of talks with Vajpayee, extending his stay, the two leaders failed to thrash out an agreement or a joint declaration by the end of the historic summit.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, delegates also decided that a third preparatory committee meeting would be necessary because of the slow progress in drafting the declaration and programme of action.’
      • ‘The Convention went into force in 1981 while a non-binding Declaration was adopted in 1963.’
      • ‘The Bishop of Bradford is among church leaders putting their signatures to a declaration urging voters to use their votes responsibly in June.’
      • ‘Later the leaders signed a joint declaration pledging to extend co-operation in economic, security and cultural areas.’
      • ‘An annex to the declaration sets out terms for the further devolution of security and government.’
      • ‘Robbery victims reporting crimes to Humberside Police are to become the first in Yorkshire to be forced to sign a new declaration leaving them open to prosecution and a possible jail term if they are lying.’
      • ‘International agreements, including declarations on human rights, are only binding on the nation states that agree them so long as each is satisfied it can interpret the agreement to suit its own perceptions and interests.’
      assertion, profession, affirmation, acknowledgement, revelation, disclosure, manifestation, confirmation, proof, testimony, validation, certification, attestation
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    3. 1.3British A public official announcement of the votes cast for candidates in an election.
      • ‘It must be a matter of minutes now to the declaration of the poll.’
      • ‘Instead of speaking at the declaration of the poll he addressed the electors only later from his hotel.’
      • ‘The words ‘directly chosen by the people’… are to be read, therefore, as referring to a process - the process which commences when an election is called, and ends with the declaration of the poll.’
      • ‘Following the declaration by the returning officer, I am greatly honoured and privileged to be elected as the Kennet councillor for the Ogbourne ward.’
      • ‘Now everyone can finally go to bed… except for me, because I'm still waiting for the official declaration in my own constituency.’
      • ‘It is not the Chair's prerogative to determine the declaration of a vote.’
      • ‘At the declaration of the poll on November 18, Dias openly stated that the campaigns of the major parties had been based on lies and deceit.’
      • ‘The learned Attorney General finally submitted that a returning officer has no power to conduct a recount once the declaration of the poll declaring a candidate to be duly elected has been made.’
    4. 1.4Law A plaintiff's statement of claims in proceedings.
      • ‘The plaintiff requests a declaration in her draft amended statement of claim.’
      • ‘I will dismiss the claim of the claimants for a declaration to the opposite effect.’
      • ‘Nevertheless, the plaintiffs sought a declaration that they were entitled to the benefit of that covenant and an order restraining the defendants from building in breach of it.’
      • ‘By cross-motion the plaintiff sought a declaration that the settlement and final release were void.’
      • ‘The court granted a declaration to the plaintiff.’
    5. 1.5Law An affirmation made in place of an oath.
    6. 1.6 The naming of trumps in bridge, whist, or a similar card game.
      • ‘He then discards any 3 cards, excluding 4 point cards (kings, or the 1,21, or 22 of trumps), those used in declarations, or trumps.’
    7. 1.7 An announcement of a combination held in certain card games.
      • ‘The central column shows the declarations - from 0 to 6 tricks.’
      • ‘Pay full attention to the declarations of the other players, not only those of your right hand neighbour, to help you guess until which moment declarations are genuine.’
      • ‘A revelation overcalls a declaration and, given the same level, an earlier player has priority.’
      • ‘Deliberately not announcing a combination is known as sinking a declaration.’
      • ‘After the round of declarations, tokens are awarded or side bets resolved in exactly the same way as for stage one, described above.’
  • 2Cricket
    An act of declaring an innings closed.

    • ‘Warwickshire closed on 70 for 3, and unless there is a clatter of wickets or a generous declaration by Nick Knight this match is drifting to a draw.’
    • ‘Warne was finally dismissed for 75, and the declaration came immediately after Hodge reached his double-century.’
    • ‘Graeme Smith had considered an overnight declaration to give his bowlers an immediate crack at England, but gave his last pair the chance to add to the total instead.’
    • ‘At that point Australia might have been contemplating a declaration, but Jason Gillespie settled in so well that he and Martyn were both undefeated at the close, having added 73 for the eighth wicket.’
    • ‘They batted positively in their second innings to set up a declaration late in the day, and then managed to snap up a late wicket to enhance their position.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin declaratio(n-), from declarare make quite clear (see declare).

Pronunciation

declaration

/dɛkləˈreɪʃ(ə)n/