Definition of declaim in English:

declaim

verb

  • reporting verb Utter or deliver words in a rhetorical or impassioned way, as if to an audience.

    with object ‘she declaimed her views’
    no object ‘a preacher declaiming from the pulpit’
    ‘an opportunity to declaim against the evils of society’
    • ‘That these same words had been declaimed ten years earlier in rather different circumstances is not mentioned.’
    • ‘So there we were, declaiming the lines, complete with interpretive dance, and the audience sat there completely straight-faced and took everything seriously.’
    • ‘Robert Graves, leonine, ascended grandly and delivered hilarious impromptu remarks before declaiming a poem.’
    • ‘‘It is all a matter of resources,’ she declaimed.’
    • ‘His mouth was open, as though he were about to declaim a poem, or speak an epigram.’
    • ‘At first I couldn't make out the words, just the preternaturally LOUD sound of a boy's voice flatly declaiming some sort of Important Announcement.’
    • ‘He's bellowing over the music, declaiming Green policies.’
    • ‘He has one of those public school faces that was created solely to stare up at blue English skies from a gently rocking punt while a tousle-haired type declaims Rupert Brooke.’
    • ‘‘A policeman without a gun is not a policeman! ‘he declaims and this axiom defines the gun culture of the Bonaerense.’’
    • ‘Speeches declaimed from the front of the stage explore theories about what is real and when an illusion becomes reality.’
    • ‘Although suspicious of unknown admirers, Tennyson was a sociable man, with a fondness for declaiming his work to a respectful audience.’
    • ‘You can actually understand his words, and he declaims poetry as if he knows what it means.’
    • ‘‘The Tory party is immortal,’ he declaims, though he is hazier about precisely when its political fortunes will revive.’
    • ‘As soon as he speaks, all you hear is some sixth-former declaiming bad poetry.’
    • ‘‘NGOs could be playing a more significant role,’ Omayma Khalil, secretary of the Women's National Council at Al-Tor City Council declaims.’
    • ‘Eminem, now wearing a smart suit and red tie, declaims in a style reminiscent of Martin Luther King.’
    • ‘Beautifully staged, with wonderfully spoken rather than declaimed language which makes it so much more understandable… at moments it seemed almost modern though I don't think the script was adapted at all.’
    • ‘‘Those words mean something to me,’ he declaimed.’
    • ‘He once started a concert by declaiming, in the haughtiest classical French, ‘I want to make one thing clear before I begin.’’
    • ‘In 1926, when O'Casey's The Plough and the Stars, was produced, there were violent scenes, Yeats declaiming to the audience that they had disgraced themselves again.’
    make a speech, give an address, give a talk, give a lecture, make an oration, deliver a sermon, give a sermon
    recite, say aloud, read aloud, read out loud, read out
    speak out, protest strongly, make a protest, make a stand, rail, inveigh, fulminate, rage, thunder
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from French déclamer or Latin declamare, from de- (expressing thoroughness) + clamare ‘to shout’.

Pronunciation

declaim

/dɪˈkleɪm/