Definition of dead in English:

dead

adjective

  • 1No longer alive.

    ‘a dead body’
    as complement ‘he was shot dead by a sniper’
    ‘there was no time to bury the dead with decency’
    • ‘The family's pet bull mastiff dog was shot dead by the gunman.’
    • ‘Just a few metres away from where I slept were all the dead bodies.’
    • ‘I found my father nearly dead, lying in the mud.’
    • ‘He's refusing to answer questions about the crash that left ten people dead.’
    • ‘I charged through the house and saw the girl lying dead on the floor.’
    • ‘A clause in the current scheme means the spouse of a dead officer would have to give up their pension if they remarried or decided to live with someone else.’
    • ‘He said the victims were carrying a dead person to a nearby cemetery for burial when their vehicle came under fire.’
    • ‘Our loved ones are only truly dead if they are forgotten.’
    • ‘My father is long dead and his death set me free, so it bothers me that he and his problem can still affect my adult life.’
    • ‘An ambulance was called but the boy was pronounced dead on arrival at hospital.’
    • ‘The men persuaded the woman they had been sent to remove a dead pigeon from her water tank.’
    • ‘Tests conducted on dead birds in those counties were positive for the virus.’
    • ‘Fear of dead bodies is a known phobia which is surprisingly common.’
    • ‘We need to figure out how we're going to handle what could be many hundreds of thousands of dead bodies.’
    • ‘Paramedics tried to treat the victim but he was declared dead at the scene.’
    • ‘It was believed she had been dead for around two hours before they arrived.’
    • ‘The driver didn't know whether the person he hit was dead or alive.’
    • ‘We waited what seemed an eternity not knowing if she would come back dead or alive.’
    • ‘And how many graphic pictures of dead bodies and desperate survivors do we need to see?’
    • ‘An emotionally distant scientist, Banner believes that his father is dead.’
    deceased, expired, departed, gone, no more, passed on, passed away
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of a part of the body) having lost sensation; numb.
      ‘I severed nerves in my leg so part of my foot is dead’
      • ‘He still has some days when his arm is dead, and he had a scare last week when his shoulder popped during practice.’
      • ‘She said that her left leg had gone dead and that she had fallen out of bed.’
      • ‘Have you ever woken up with a dead arm?’
      • ‘His foot is dead and they need to operate immediately to save what's left of his leg.’
      numb, benumbed, deadened, desensitized, insensible, insensate, unfeeling
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Lacking emotion, sympathy, or sensitivity.
      ‘a cold, dead voice’
      • ‘Humour is actually a very important part of life and in fact you're dead without it.’
      • ‘The warmth from that simple touch and kiss thawed his cold dead heart back to life.’
      • ‘His eyes are dead, as black as the depths of the sea, glancing at us as his halo of white-transparent hair swirls around his head.’
      • ‘Her emerald eyes were wide open, cold and almost dead.’
      • ‘The grin was gone, and his voice had gone so emotionally dead that it was almost frightening.’
      • ‘But now that he was out, he sounded as dead as he had at the first meeting with his lawyer.’
      • ‘Anyone who can listen to Mozart's Requiem Mass without getting shivers up the spine is either physically or emotionally dead.’
      • ‘He felt dead and dull inside, like an electric toy with the batteries removed.’
      • ‘When a woman's voice from a car alongside him calls his name, his face is emotionless, blank, dead.’
      • ‘He turns me around, jerking my chin up to look into his dead, black eyes.’
      • ‘A person who has always been truly alone is one who will be emotionally dead.’
      • ‘His voice sounded dead even to himself and he wondered why he was still talking.’
      • ‘But now that I am older and emotionally dead inside, these things bother me less and less.’
      • ‘All the emotion had left her voice, and it was empty, dead, and lifeless, a mirror of her soul.’
      emotionless, unemotional, unfeeling, impassive, unresponsive, insensitive, indifferent, dispassionate, inexpressive, wooden, stony, cold, frigid, inert
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 No longer current, relevant, or important.
      ‘pollution had become a dead issue’
      • ‘Now that the Eastern Corridor is a dead issue, dramatic action needs to be taken to address the transport woes in the region.’
      • ‘Just because the war is to all intents and purposes over doesn't mean that this is a dead issue.’
      • ‘This demonstration shows that the movement is not at all dead, but alive and growing.’
      • ‘The postwar alliance that once structured and indeed defined our world is dead.’
      • ‘Our voters confirmed that Europe was far from being a dead and done issue for any party.’
      • ‘This brought tears to my eyes and I thought of a headline in your paper some months ago saying community living is dead.’
      • ‘I suppose that means that in one small way, chivalry isn't dead.’
      • ‘Despite that result, however, there are indications that the issue is not completely dead.’
      • ‘Images move you up the television news agenda; without camera access, my friend, your issue is dead.’
      • ‘Which is not to say that the well-wrought traditional panto is entirely dead.’
      • ‘He thought that it was a dead issue, he had dealt with that.’
      • ‘In any case, unless there's some clear photo from tonight, I think this issue may be dead.’
      • ‘The interim economic plan, including the third currency, was dead before it was born.’
      • ‘Browsing through the diverse range of opinions posted by readers, it is hard to believe that the issue is dead.’
      • ‘Financial services is a dead industry and cannot be revived anywhere close to what it was.’
      • ‘The dining room is dead and the kitchen is the new hub of the home according to Yorkshire kitchen manufacturer Omega.’
      • ‘Today, with the Warsaw Pact dead, France can safely make its reach for grandeur.’
      • ‘The Goth scene is dead and the venues are only open so people can enjoy the music and dance and be with their friends and have a good time.’
      • ‘The Atlantic alliance that won the Cold War is virtually dead.’
    4. 1.4 Devoid of living things.
      ‘a dead planet’
      • ‘Sometimes we throw our seeds to them, but our efforts seem hopeless since their soil is barren, empty and dead.’
      • ‘The land is dead, its animals gone, its cities covered in ash, most of its people killed by violence or disease.’
      • ‘Our view of Mars has changed dramatically from that of a cold, dry, geologically dead world to a warm, wet, oasis where life may have arisen and may yet thrive in certain locations.’
      • ‘As the rather clichéd but very true saying goes, there are no jobs on a dead planet.’
      • ‘It was a dry and dead place with almost nothing living out here but a few cacti and some small, prickly bushes.’
      • ‘In 45,000 million years from now, it will turn into a small dead globe.’
      • ‘It was pointed out at the meeting that any area devoid of people is dead.’
      barren, lifeless, bare, empty, desolate, sterile
      extinguished, quenched, quashed, quelled, suppressed, smothered, stifled
      View synonyms
    5. 1.5 (of a place or time) characterized by a lack of activity or excitement.
      ‘Brussels isn't dead after dark, if you know where to look’
      • ‘In the end I only got one opportunity to go in to this place, and the night I was in there was absolutely dead, no-one else at all.’
      • ‘The degree of public support these workers had was an amazing spectacle - the stores were absolutely dead.’
      • ‘They were still in the city centre and at this time of the evening every building looked empty and dead to Alexa's desperately searching eyes.’
      • ‘I look at the coverage on the news, and the streets look empty and dead.’
      • ‘When he was singing decent songs he could send electricity through those dead restaurants he was playing.’
      • ‘Got sent home early since the place was dead, a nice change to actually get the last bus.’
      • ‘But you can always count on some activity even mid week where other places are dead.’
      • ‘Turned out the place was dead, hardly worth turning up for.’
      • ‘St. George's is normally pretty dead on a Friday night, but last night the streets were crowded.’
      • ‘The waterfront was also dead, an empty stretch of dock littered with bits of rope, fish, and other such trash.’
      • ‘As he walked the dead streets he was aware of tears running down his cheeks.’
      • ‘Camembert, once a dead town, had suddenly become very lively indeed.’
      • ‘I do not know how many members have visited the little town of Havelock, but 15 years ago that town was dead.’
      uneventful, uninteresting, unexciting, uninspiring, dull, boring, flat, quiet, sleepy, slow, stale, humdrum, tame, pedestrian, lacklustre, lifeless
      View synonyms
    6. 1.6 (of money) not financially productive.
      ‘far from being dead money, it is available to be spent or invested’
      • ‘The money is dead money unless we have some support from them.’
      • ‘All this though doesn't change the fact that my rent will always be dead money.’
      • ‘You can't go on paying out dead money every month on something you don't own.’
      • ‘Many economists regard defence outlays as dead money, money that produces nothing of measurable value.’
      • ‘The pension costs mean that an increasing slice of the force's budget is dead money which has no impact on front-line policing.’
      • ‘Is this dead money as I am sure there are many people in the same situation as me.’
      • ‘Renting in Swindon is quite expensive and it's dead money really but I'd rather compromise on that and see the world instead.’
      • ‘Start a pension scheme and try to get on the property ladder as quickly as possible, as rent is dead money.’
      • ‘This is dead finance as the loss is far greater than the gain and gets worse by the hour.’
      • ‘Government money is dead money, ring-fenced and controlled so that every penny can meet the rigours of post - audit.’
    7. 1.7 (of sound) without resonance; dull.
      ‘the earth hit the coffin with a peculiarly dead sound’
      • ‘To locate dry rot, tap questionable areas with a hammer and listen for a hollow, dead sound.’
      • ‘However over-ripe melons make that same dead sound, so this isn't the most reliable test.’
      • ‘I let the bag drop with a dead thud to the floor.’
    8. 1.8 (of a colour) not glossy or bright.
      ‘higher up, the marble becomes of a dull, dead colour’
      • ‘They were both, I found from careful measurements, of precisely the same dimensions and surface area, and each presented the same dull dead black surface.’
      • ‘Students tinted the surface ground with a dead color, like brownish-green.’
      • ‘Only at that point was there any roughening of the dead black surface.’
      • ‘The flats were dead black in contrast to the polished edges, almost seeming to draw the light in.’
    9. 1.9 (of a piece of equipment) no longer functioning.
      ‘the phone had gone dead’
      • ‘I did finally find a link that connected to the same dead server I had been trying to access.’
      • ‘Before Kat could respond, the line went dead and the faint beeping of the phone began to bother her.’
      • ‘The pair were telling him what they had found on the planet when the transmission went dead.’
      • ‘The television was dead and would not respond at all.’
      • ‘Sure enough, she came in to work the next day, and the network was dead.’
      • ‘The line suddenly went dead on us around 4 days ago and came back only this afternoon.’
      • ‘I picked up the mike to tell Mann my problem, but the transmitter had gone dead.’
      • ‘The first match began and before the commentator could say hello to the live audience, one of the game monitors went dead.’
      • ‘Don't sign any software agreement until you have read the fine print carefully, otherwise you could one day find yourself with a very dead computer.’
      not working, out of order, out of commission, inoperative, inactive, ineffective, in disrepair, in a state of disrepair, broken, broken-down, malfunctioning, defective
      View synonyms
    10. 1.10 (of an electric circuit or conductor) carrying or transmitting no current.
      ‘the batteries are dead’
      • ‘I came back last week from a spell in Istanbul to discover that the power in my flat was dead.’
      • ‘Moving the crossbeam was the most desirable option, and the power lines appeared dead.’
      • ‘When the boat got back to the harbor after the snorkeling trip, our rental car's battery was dead.’
      • ‘You can create closed loops and boxes without short circuits by using dead connectors.’
      • ‘Our techie found that the issue was a dead battery on the upstairs server.’
    11. 1.11 No longer alight.
      ‘the fire had been dead for some days’
      • ‘But the next day, the fire was dead. With no one to feed it, it went out while men were sleeping.’
      • ‘The staff had left, together with the jeep, and around the dead fire were the empty Genghis Khan bottles.’
      • ‘Jim stepped away from the cold embers of the dead fire and walked into the jungle.’
      • ‘When she arrived at his house he wasn't there - the fire in the hearth was dead and he'd gone off into the bush.’
    12. 1.12 (of a glass or bottle) empty or no longer being used.
      ‘they got all the dead glasses and put them on the table’
      • ‘After being served our desert we had to call a waiter to clear all the dead glasses away.’
      • ‘The place is covered in empty pizza boxes, dead bottles of booze and cigarette butts.’
      barren, lifeless, bare, empty, desolate, sterile
      View synonyms
    13. 1.13 (of the ball in a game) out of play.
      ‘the ball had gone dead’
      See also dead ball
      • ‘If an umpire is struck by a batted ball in that position, the ball is dead.’
      • ‘But a decision about an actual goal being scored when the ball is dead ought to be checked if there is any doubt in the ref's mind or even if there's not.’
      • ‘With the ball eventually rolling dead, Smith decided against the penalty try.’
      • ‘Keep in mind that on such plays the ball is not dead and the batter-runner may try for four bases at his own risk if he chooses.’
      • ‘The referee should not permit a player to resume until the ball is dead.’
    14. 1.14 (of a cricket pitch or other surface) lacking springiness or bounce.
      ‘the pitch was so utterly dead that Pollock could hardly get the ball bail-high’
      • ‘This pitch was completely dead from the first ball.’
      • ‘He demonstrated that even on dead pitches a degree of aggression can bring dividends.’
      • ‘England fast bowlers seemed to bowl too many short deliveries on a dead pitch today.’
      • ‘But after last night's rain I knew the ground would be on the dead side and if he didn't fall he'd have a chance.’
      • ‘I'm not criticising anyone but it's just a dead surface and there's no response from it.’
  • 2attributive Complete; absolute.

    ‘we sat in dead silence’
    • ‘There was dead silence for a minute and then something streaked past.’
    • ‘Since disaster struck the students have been making frantic phone calls only to be greeted by dead silence.’
    • ‘There was a dead silence on the court for a few moments before Flynn's roar woke the officials up.’
    • ‘There was a long moment of dead silence as Jessica processed that piece of depressing information.’
    • ‘Everyone sat there in dead silence for a moment, quietly digesting what they'd just heard.’
    • ‘There was about half a minute of total dead silence before she could manage any words.’
    • ‘The most amusing parts were when they'd call for audience participation, and there'd be dead silence.’
    • ‘The room fell into dead silence as it was clear no one had the money to upstage his bid.’
    • ‘She thought her little five-year-old heartbeat came to a dead stop in the silence.’
    • ‘All sound stopped instantly and there was dead silence from inside the bar.’
    • ‘You'll hear gasps, a dead silence, then the sound of sobbing.’
    • ‘The fact that this research has not lead to dozens of follow up studies, but instead was followed by dead silence, raises many questions in my mind.’
    • ‘Maybe the officials can answer, as there is dead silence from Government members.’
    • ‘A dead silence followed as each person took time to analyze his surroundings.’
    • ‘And if you can hold eight hundred people in dead silence and hear a pin drop you know something's going right.’
    • ‘It's been almost a year now and there has been pretty much dead silence on the matter.’
    • ‘That comment caused dead silence, because he hit the nail on the head.’
    • ‘A wave of laughter flared up at that one, followed by a dead silence.’
    • ‘There was dead silence for the first 10 minutes, until Shelly's dad came and got her.’
    • ‘The class stayed in the kind of dead silence that most teachers would greet with joy.’
    complete, absolute, total, entire, outright, utter, downright, out-and-out, thorough, unqualified, unmitigated
    View synonyms

adverb

  • 1often as submodifier Absolutely; completely.

    ‘you're dead right’
    ‘he was dead against the idea’
    • ‘Businessman John Walker is dead certain his funeral will go to plan.’
    • ‘John's description of it is both unusually amusing and absolutely dead accurate.’
    • ‘As the bus pelts past scattered dwellings on a dead straight road, I'm reminded of home.’
    • ‘I got up early this morning in the hope to have a surf before work - only to find that it was dead flat here at Llandudno.’
    • ‘Before she could say anything, however, his eyes rolled up into his head and he fainted dead away at her feet.’
    • ‘It's dead empty in the pool after work, so I can churn up and down at my own pace.’
    • ‘I am dead certain we have the talent needed for winning in the Olympic games.’
    • ‘The place is dead empty save for a man who invites us to discover 5,000 years of authentic Mexican cuisine.’
    • ‘The entire student body fell dead silent.’
    • ‘I needed some redemption and was happy that the last day was dead flat and fast.’
    • ‘He was about to cross the street when he stopped dead in his tracks.’
    • ‘He stood alone at the line, dead certain he was going to hit three free throws.’
    • ‘Without the car's rumblings, it was dead quiet with the exception of a few cricket chirps.’
    • ‘Realizing that his expression was dead serious she found out that he was definitely not lying.’
    • ‘She stopped dead in her tracks and saw the red convertible stop as well.’
    • ‘It's got the longest, thinnest legs I've seen on a bird the size of say, a large gull, with a dead straight beak.’
    • ‘My monitor fills with images of two men saluting, grinning thumbs up or looking dead serious.’
    • ‘More importantly, he turned over the ball three times and he stopped the opponent dead on five occasions.’
    completely, absolutely, totally, utterly, deadly, perfectly, entirely, wholly, fully, quite, thoroughly, unreservedly
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Exactly.
      ‘they arrived dead on time’
      • ‘The timetable on the wall tells me that the train is dead on time.’
      • ‘Then I was gearing up to leave dead on 5.30 pm when the boss points out a problem.’
      • ‘We got there at dead on 6: 30, and there were plenty of people who arrived even later.’
      • ‘Providing that he knows the route, we will arrive at our destination dead on time.’
      • ‘That way I can take my time, not have to worry too much about getting in dead on time in the morning.’
      • ‘I promise I will fire at least twelve shots, and that at least nine will be dead on target.’
      • ‘Many DJ's finish dead on midnight, we on the other hand continue to play if the night is still swinging.’
      exactly, precisely, sharp, on the dot, dead on, promptly, punctually, on the nail
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Straight; directly.
      ‘red flares were seen dead ahead’
      • ‘There was a ninety-degree turn to the left, and a street sign dead ahead.’
      • ‘It will take away from the classic perspective of looking at city hall dead on.’
      • ‘She spotted the Lich Tower dead ahead, and figured it had to be just another mile's walk.’
      • ‘One lay dead ahead in a section all by itself, and she guessed that it probably belonged to Cal.’
      • ‘She was always scared of looking at people dead in the eye.’
      directly, exactly, precisely, immediately, right, straight, plumb, due, squarely
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3British informal Very.
      ‘omelettes are dead easy to prepare’
      • ‘Gotta admit, it does look dead good, bit bright, but dead good.’
      • ‘His piece on the clamour for new nuclear power stations is dead good.’
      • ‘So I have been feeling dead miserable, and just grateful that bubby has decided to stay put and not subject me to labour quite yet.’
      • ‘And the story of her and Bob at the VW Bus weekend was dead funny too, especially when she acted out the parts of some of the people she met!’
      • ‘Without his sense of color and composition, the film would be dead dull.’
      • ‘He was twittering and laughing as if this was dead funny.’
      • ‘It sounds dead good and I fancy having a go.’
      • ‘I really don't know why you are asking me as my life is dead dull.’
      • ‘It's been a dead easy week, radio-wise - just like having your own PR company working for you.’
      • ‘Finally the last model took her position and a few dead boring speeches were made.’
      very, extremely, exceedingly, exceptionally, tremendously, immensely, hugely
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • dead and buried

    • Over; finished.

      ‘the incident is dead and buried’
      • ‘Are those plans still alive or they are dead and buried?’
      • ‘We now need the Fire Brigade and the Government to honour their commitment because this is an issue that will never be dead and buried.’
      • ‘Soon this nation will be dead and buried unless it changes its philosophy.’
      • ‘He has realised that the constitution, as it stands, should be deemed dead and buried.’
      • ‘With fourteen minutes to play in normal time they looked dead and buried as they trailed by 3-1.’
      • ‘Even so, the traditional ideals these clichés had replaced were dead and buried.’
      • ‘The matter, as far as she was concerned, was dead and buried.’
      • ‘St. Peter's were happy to come out of the match with a win as they looked dead and buried for the first twenty minutes of the second half.’
      • ‘How will this ancient struggle, which liberal theorists once thought dead and buried, end?’
      • ‘Despite being a man down there was still belief in the players that this game was not dead and buried.’
  • dead from the neck up

    • informal Stupid.

      • ‘Any person who maintains the same attitudes over a twenty-year period is probably dead from the neck up.’
      • ‘The girl must be dead from the neck up that she'll go along with it.’
      • ‘Right now, I'm somewhat overwhelmed, by how many Americans seem to be dead from the neck up, as we approach this election.’
      • ‘The supporting cast was either over the top or dead from the neck up.’
      • ‘My dear fellow, I may be dead from the neck up, but rack my brains as I may I can't see why a chap should need thirty pages to describe how he turns over in bed before going to sleep.’
      • ‘If you believe that he's the toughest player in the NFL, you are truly dead from the neck up.’
      • ‘Not all the students were dead from the neck up.’
      stupid, foolish, senseless, brainless, mindless, idiotic, imbecilic, imbecile, insane, lunatic, asinine, ridiculous, ludicrous, absurd, preposterous, silly, inane, witless, half-baked, empty-headed, unintelligent, half-witted, slow-witted, weak-minded
      View synonyms
  • dead in the water

    • 1(of a ship) unable to move.

      ‘the vessel was dead in the water with no engine power’
      • ‘Although the crew managed to restart the engines in the middle of the night, when rescuing ships arrived she was still dead in the water, her engine room was flooding and she was rolling heavily.’
      • ‘Two hundred feet below the surface the ship sat dead in the water, not moving.’
      • ‘It's the second time fire has left the 22-year-old Queen of Surrey dead in the water since it came back from a month-long refit at Deas Dock earlier this spring.’
      • ‘An unforeseeable minor glitch in his water pump left him dead in the water for three days.’
      • ‘It worked, but we lost all communications systems, and we're dead in the water.’
      • ‘We had stopped to pick him up, and while dead in the water we had six to eight speed boats fly by us on both sides at 50-60 mph.’
      • ‘There was a hesitant moment then, ‘Skipper, right now we're dead in the water.’’
      • ‘Communications were established and the aircraft reported the vessel dead in the water with six people on board.’
      • ‘We had hit a vessel that I thought had been dead in the water.’
      • ‘Two enemy ships exploded in a rolling ball of flame, and another was left dead in the water, it's main power grid severed by the withering hail of bolts.’
      1. 1.1Unable to function effectively.
        ‘the economy is dead in the water’
        • ‘Social Security privatization is dead in the water.’
        • ‘Britain's fishing industry would be dead in the water inside 12 months under ferocious new conservation rules demanded by scientists, fishermen warned yesterday.’
        • ‘Mr Price said: ‘This scheme is almost certainly dead in the water.’’
        • ‘We know we have to keep on top of late payments, that cash is the lifeblood of our company and that if we didn't collect, we'd be dead in the water.’
        • ‘If we don't put forward some options, we'll be dead in the water.’
        • ‘The bad-debt fallout and other effects of this collapse have left the once-dynamic economy dead in the water.’
        • ‘And 30 or 40 years later, the project is dead in the water, as he admits.’
        • ‘Software that automates the management of personal computers can make a tech-support staff considerably more efficient and, ideally, reduce the likelihood that a machine will end up dead in the water.’
        • ‘All the banks need a good presence in Taiwan or they will be dead in the water.’
        • ‘With analysts and some EU countries already saying the treaty is virtually dead in the water, the British decision is seen by many as tantamount to signing its death certificate.’
  • dead meat

    • informal Used to suggest someone is in serious trouble.

      ‘if anyone finds out, you're dead meat’
      • ‘Any Tory or Labour leader with a poll rating of 20 per cent would be dead meat.’
      • ‘I mean, the first time I walked out on a nightclub floor, I was terrified, absolutely terrified, but you can't ever let them know you're scared because, if you let them know you're scared, you're dead meat.’
      • ‘You are in this mess with me and if you're not going stop arguing, the two of us - you and me - are going to be dead meat!’
      • ‘She glared at him; ‘Didn't I tell you that if you tried anything, you were dead meat?’
      • ‘If you say ‘I speak 5 languages’ but are unable to actually do so, you will probably be dead meat.’
      • ‘Look, all I'm trying to say is, you are dead meat.’
      • ‘Mark clearly thought his days were numbered; as soon as the adults found out he figured he'd be dead meat.’
      • ‘We were basically dead meat, with the evidence red hot in our sweaty palms.’
      • ‘Better not let her or her friends find out or you're dead meat.’
      • ‘‘If they don't even bother having drills,’ she said, ‘that means that once someone attacks us with nuclear weapons, we are dead meat.’’
  • the dead of night

    • The quietest, darkest part of the night.

      ‘I woke up at the dead of night’
      • ‘It seems that someone is secretly dropping money all over the city in the dead of night, for no apparent purpose.’
      • ‘However, you never know what strange ideas will suddenly grip me in the dead of night, when I'm alone with my computer.’
      • ‘Theoretically, you could get there in 13 hours but then you'd probably have to travel in the dead of night.’
      • ‘Already weak from days without food and water, he and three colleagues had sneaked past a cordon of armed guards in the dead of night.’
      • ‘Ever wondered why the cat is so particular about settling territorial disputes in the dead of night when everyone is asleep?’
      • ‘It is understood the service could have been held at the dead of night, so as not to upset mourners attending other cremations.’
      • ‘He was eventually released 25 miles away in a quiet country lane in Northwich, Cheshire, in the dead of night.’
      • ‘Access was gained in the dead of night by removing heavy steel bars from the drawing room windows at Warneford Place.’
      • ‘He stole into the abbey in the dead of night, intent on stealing a personal memento of Scotland's greatest king.’
      • ‘She and her brother received regular telephone calls in the dead of night from her father, helpless with pain.’
  • the dead of winter

    • The coldest part of winter.

      ‘golf can be an unpleasant experience in the dead of winter’
      • ‘I nearly caught frostbite at an Oslo bus stop in the dead of winter.’
      • ‘It was the dead of winter and there was snow on the ground and sheets of ice on the Rhone.’
      • ‘I used to stand outside in the dead of winter, waiting for the mailman to come down the block.’
      • ‘Even in the dead of winter, the scenic vistas of the snow-capped fjords enchanted me.’
      • ‘Since burials could not be performed in the dead of winter, gravestone orders were probably not placed during the winter, creating a seasonal decline in income that had to be filled by other work, such as smithing.’
      • ‘I've been to Yosemite National Park at least half a dozen times since I was a kid, but I've never gone there in the dead of winter.’
      • ‘Finally, in what should be the dead of winter but isn't, the soil is workable enough for Rick and I to give it a thorough digging.’
      • ‘I took two trips to Russia in the dead of winter.’
      • ‘In the dead of winter, he'll cross between Alaska and Russia via the frozen Bering Strait, perhaps braving temperatures of 80 degrees below zero.’
      • ‘Not all hunting seasons are held in the dead of winter.’
  • dead on

    • Exactly right.

      ‘her judgement was dead on’
      • ‘Hmm, I thought the article was dead on, and your reaction to it seems to support my opinion.’
      • ‘Can everyone please pay attention to the list-ridden post below, because apparently it's dead on.’
      • ‘I think that he's dead on as far as the differences between the two countries goes.’
      • ‘The central argument that education about the horrors of the 20th Century is essential to the world's future is dead on.’
      • ‘Seriously though, this was so dead on that I decided to read the horoscopes of people I know.’
  • dead on one's feet

    • informal Extremely tired.

      ‘get some sleep—you must be dead on your feet’
      • ‘I can't seem to get into bed unless I am exhausted and dead on my feet.’
      • ‘I was tired but not yet completely dead on my feet.’
      • ‘When the determined trainees finally crossed the 40th kilometre mark and knew that they had made it, they were almost dead on their feet.’
      • ‘We got back in the early hours, and I was absolutely dead on my feet.’
      • ‘He was still standing, but I knew he was dead on his feet.’
      • ‘I know that at the end of term they are dead on their feet.’
      • ‘We got home at half past one, dead on our feet, with aching legs, sore backs and barely coherent with tiredness, but, nevertheless, able to share our impressions of the highlights and lowlights.’
      • ‘People were dead on their feet but we just battled on because we had to.’
      • ‘He hadn't eaten in a while and was practically dead on his feet.’
      • ‘She was obviously dead on her feet she was so tired, and just staying awake for me.’
      exhausted, tired out, worn out, weary, dog-tired, bone-tired, bone-weary, ready to drop, on one's last legs, asleep on one's feet, drained, fatigued, enervated, debilitated, spent
      View synonyms
  • dead to the world

    • informal Fast asleep.

      • ‘I know Logan falls asleep within 3 minutes because when I try to discuss things which bother me 4 minutes after turning off the light, he's dead to the world.’
      • ‘Ten minutes later, I was dead to the world yet again, buried deep beneath my warm comforter and cotton sheets.’
      • ‘I turned and saw that Andrew was also dead to the world.’
      • ‘My Grandma is usually in bed by eight thirty, dead to the world by eight forty five.’
      • ‘I turn my back for a moment, and when I return, Terry is lying on the floor of the van in the foetal position, motionless and silent, dead to the world.’
      • ‘Now he's snoozing peacefully, dead to the world.’
      • ‘Those pills work fast; he'll be dead to the world in under ten minutes.’
      • ‘He was dead to the world and would probably never know what he had done.’
      • ‘For the hundredth time, she glances over to the bed, where Frank has been lying in a medicated sleep, dead to the world.’
      • ‘Usually the pills knocked her out cold, leaving her dead to the world for hours - but this time it was different.’
  • the dead ring of

    • informal The exact double of.

      ‘you're the dead ring of your father at the same age’
      • ‘I was always telling Dan that young Jimmy would have been the dead ring of him if he had not been drowned.’
      • ‘He had never said to him that he had identified the body as that of Phil, but he had said that it was the dead ring of her.’
      • ‘I have still got that card you picked out because it was like my dog Nip, and it was the dead ring of him.’
      • ‘"They tell me that I'm the dead ring of him," he said proudly.’
      • ‘There is actually someone on the show who looks the dead ring of her, no joke.’
  • dead 'un

    • informal A loser, especially a racehorse that is made to lose deliberately.

      ‘the trick to picking the Cup winner was always to pick the dead 'un in the race before every Cup’
      • ‘You might be riding a dead 'un, not supposed to win.’
      • ‘After the event Stewards would declare the dead un with correct weight.’
      • ‘She ran second in Perth on a dead 'un.’
      • ‘On selected events they could run a 'Mystery Dead Un' feature.’
      • ‘I didn't have the ability, as the term was in those days, to run a dead un.’
  • from the dead

    • 1From a state of death.

      ‘according to Christian belief, Jesus rose from the dead three days later’
      • ‘Spain's most infamous spy returned from the dead Monday, five years after his sister published a death notice.’
      • ‘With your bloodshot eyes and pale yellow skin, you look like you've just rose up from the dead.’
      • ‘It is believed that Jesus was crucified, buried and rose from the dead in this place.’
      • ‘Such forgiveness, well meaning as it may be, is not going to bring people back from the dead or undo a lifetime of misery for others.’
      • ‘Miracle girl Michelle Wheatley plans to thank the people who brought her back from the dead - by handing over the cash from a sponsored walk.’
      • ‘The shrine is revered as the place where Jesus was crucified, buried and rose from the dead.’
      • ‘He expected and accepted a brutal, sadistic, death - and then he rose from the dead.’
      • ‘As a Christian, I believe that God is love and that in love He died and rose from the dead so that I might have eternal life.’
      • ‘Then, on the third day he was resurrected from the dead, conquering death and opening the way into heaven.’
      • ‘Still, is it unethical or immoral to bring an extinct species back from the dead?’
      1. 1.1From a period of obscurity or inactivity.
        ‘the cartoon brought animation back from the dead’
        • ‘He believes he has brought his party back from the dead and ready for government.’
        • ‘In one of the greatest fightbacks in sporting history, he came back from the dead and brought a new life to international chess.’
        • ‘Hadn't we seen other teams come back from the dead to make progress?’
        • ‘The staunch York City supporter today launched a double plan aimed at bringing the club back from the dead.’
        • ‘The task now facing the 2005 candidates is bringing the party back from the dead.’
        • ‘Lately, light entertainment seems to have come back from the dead, bringing with it his TV career.’
        • ‘In the best of the conditions early on, when the wind was an irrelevancy, the South African came back from the dead and put a 66 on the board.’
        • ‘They are poised to bring the game back from the dead.’
        • ‘We will have a chance to see how a show can be brought back from the dead.’
        • ‘Now, after a long, unlikely crusade, he has brought the company back from the dead.’
  • more dead than alive

    • (of a person) hurt and in a very poor state.

      ‘he was breathing, but more dead than alive’
      • ‘Then we flew to Palermo and drove for six hours on a windy coastal road to Taormina - we arrived more dead than alive.’
      • ‘According to the Tuscan Ambassador, Galileo returned from Rome " more dead than alive ".’
      • ‘They dragged me from under the table more dead than alive.’
      • ‘You were carried out of here only yesterday, more dead than alive.’
      • ‘He struggles ashore withhis father and a few fellow survivors, more dead than alive.’
      • ‘His doctor said he would never get up from that bed - that he was more dead than alive.’
      • ‘Jean, the gas fumes in his head quite dissipated, staggered away, more dead than alive.’
      • ‘The other is to deal with many street dogs - many I have seen look more dead than alive.’
      • ‘At this time, Ulysses is dumped on Ithaca's shore, more dead than alive.’
      • ‘He was hauled from the boat more dead than alive but, fortunately, recovered not long after.’
  • stop dead

    • Stop (or cause to stop) suddenly or abruptly.

      ‘Rob stopped dead and turned to face me’
      ‘the sight stopped him dead in his tracks’
      stop dead, stop in one's tracks, stop, stand still, stand stock still, go rigid, become motionless, become paralysed
      View synonyms
  • wouldn't be seen (or caught) dead

    • informal Used to express strong dislike for a particular thing.

      ‘I wouldn't be seen dead in a navy suit’
      ‘she wouldn't be seen dead shopping with her mother’
      • ‘Everyone else might be much more dressed up than you are, or wearing clothes you wouldn't be caught dead in.’
      • ‘I asked half a dozen young men who work in my office and each of them gasped,’ I wouldn't be caught dead in that’.’
      • ‘I wouldn't be seen dead in a baseball cap in the UK but when I am abroad I'm never without one!’
      • ‘Trinny wouldn't be seen dead in what I'm wearing.’
      • ‘Those who wouldn't be seen dead at a concert might gain an acceptance and even appreciation for the style and art of the music, culture and dedicated individuals.’
      • ‘In fact, men and women who under normal circumstances wouldn't be caught dead in anything fancier than a ski parka arrived in black tie and evening gowns.’
      • ‘I wouldn't be seen dead with these guys on my bookshelf.’
      • ‘On tropical islands they wear Hawaiian print shirts and neon shorts that ordinarily they wouldn't be caught dead in.’
      • ‘There's dirt on her face, and the work gloves she's wearing are ugly, utilitarian leather things that normally she wouldn't be caught dead in.’
      • ‘Most school yard bullies wouldn't be caught dead in a dance class, or so the old macho stereotype would have us believe.’

Origin

Old English dēad, of Germanic origin: related to Dutch dood and German tot, also to die.

Pronunciation

dead

/dɛd/