Main definitions of darn in English

: darn1darn2

darn1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Mend (a hole in knitted material) by interweaving yarn with a needle.

    ‘I don't expect you to darn my socks’
    • ‘‘You darn a sock, dear,’ she said slowly and clearly, making sure he understood.’
    • ‘While Linda is in the kitchen darning stockings, he moves to the edge of the stage.’
    • ‘We microwave our dinners, movies come out on DVD mere weeks after they're released, and instead of darning a sock with a hole in it, folks simply buy a new pair.’
    • ‘However, he has revealed that he darns his own socks as part of a superstition that he must sport the same pair all season.’
    • ‘I still darn my own socks, having learnt how to when I was young.’
    • ‘Most people would rather darn socks than clean their home.’
    • ‘Detached from our heads, hair can be used to mend garments, to darn holes in stockings.’
    • ‘Often she works till 10 pm, and then returns home to darn holes in clothing for her extended family.’
    • ‘Nowadays, however, marriage afflicts everyone rather later in life, women aren't desperate to wed for economic security, and no one knows how to darn a sock.’
    • ‘At first I gave it some rudimentary household chores, such as changing gramophone needles and darning stockings.’
    • ‘However, Gates will not be darning his own socks just yet; his personal wealth fell from £53 to £37.5 billion, according to the Sunday Times.’
    • ‘She's in her usual place at the other end of the table darning socks.’
    • ‘It would be easier to imagine Maria Callas darning socks.’
    • ‘Many of the gypsies ignored her, sitting outside their tents, preparing a meal or darning a sock or mending a hem.’
    • ‘Socks are so cheap that it would be lunacy to spend time darning them and plastic is so cheap it is almost free.’
    • ‘Hardly any clothes were inside, except for two darned white shirts, one pair of brown pants, and two finely tailored suits, one gray, the other brown.’
    • ‘Over the last few days Laoise had been in the camp she had made friends with many of the men, using her spare time to darn their socks and make them meals.’
    • ‘She darned socks each Sunday for the Uncle as it was, receiving them by mail.’
    • ‘Aiming for the best possible results, I took an ultra-casual approach, snatching up ingredients at random while drinking a glass of wine, reading a newspaper and darning a hole in my daughter's socks.’
    • ‘In a small tin in the bottom of the pillowcase she finds needles and cotton and between sips of her tea and another pipe, she darns the holes in the hessian bag with those same deliberate tiny stitches.’
    mend, repair, reinforce
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Embroider (material) with a large running stitch.

noun

  • A place in a garment that has been darned.

    ‘a sweater with darns in the elbows’
    • ‘Near evening in the cool blue mountains, I would sit and smoke my pipe, surveying the exquisite landscape all around, forest dotted here and there with the patches of beautiful vegetable gardens like darns in an old garment.’
    • ‘Then she unfolded her napkin as if to examine the darns, and she really thought of applying herself to this work, counting the threads in the linen.’
    • ‘Later as a young adult she graduated to darning socks and clothing patching as an art form with patterns woven into the darns.’
    • ‘Clothing was rationed in just the same way as food and Mother was always altering my clothes, patching, turning collars and darning the darns on my socks.’
    • ‘And being so close to the stage I could see the darns in the showgirls' tights, so much for the glamour of Show Biz!’
    patch, repair, reinforcement, stitch, mend
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 17th century: perhaps from dialect dern ‘to hide’, which is from Old English diernan, of West Germanic origin; compare with Middle Dutch dernen ‘stop holes in (a dyke)’.

Pronunciation

darn

/dɑːn/

Main definitions of darn in English

: darn1darn2

darn2

(US durn)

verb, exclamation, & adjective

North American
informal
  • as verb ‘darn it all, Poppa’
    euphemism for damn
    as adjective ‘he was a darn sight younger than Jill’
    as submodifier ‘you're darn right it's up to me!’
    • ‘Lake Conroe has a darned good predator population, what with its black, white and hybrid bass along with all those crappie and catfish.’
    • ‘In short, network operators believe it's too darn expensive.’
    • ‘So the Pentagon is basically telling us that the reason Stars and Stripes exists - to provide a real newspaper to troops during wartime - is just too gosh darned expensive to fund.’
    • ‘Sixth and last, some polluters felt that meeting the standards was just too darn expensive and threatened plant closures.’
    • ‘Other dealers pass up promotional opportunities because they say they're too busy, and, of course, many say it is just too darned expensive.’
    • ‘I can't help thinking, though, that if I suffered under such an affliction I'd be a darn sight more careful with my eardrums’
    • ‘The big problem with consumer credit (or consumer debt, as it should be called) is that it's pretty darned expensive.’
    • ‘Just south of Los Angeles, Elon Musk is trying to build a better rocket and to solve a problem that is dogging NASA, why is it so darned expensive to get into space?’
    • ‘I've held that darn gold card now for a long, long time, and paid an annual fee for it.’
    • ‘You can play with controllers, but it's so much more fun with the maracas - too bad they're so darn expensive!’
    • ‘Air conditioning is darned expensive but somewhat less disruptive than moving house.’
    • ‘You may not like stuff that gets described as epic but, darn it, you do.’
    • ‘I'd say that Erwin Schrodinger is a pretty darn cool scientist.’
    • ‘Just as well the dinner was good because it was a darned expensive shopping trip.’
    • ‘There'll be light touch regulation for those who behave responsibly and a darn sight heavier for those who don't.’
    • ‘They are just so darn reassuring and they were traveling in a pretty darn good direction, about 160 degrees, at about 15 mph.’
    • ‘The fact is, Tom Fazio's architecture is extremely expensive to create, and darned expensive to maintain.’
    • ‘My take is that helping these folks live a normal life in the community is a darn sight better than the old way of simply locking up the poor souls in asylums and throwing the key away.’
    • ‘But we did have a team, and a pretty darn good one, too.’
    • ‘That's why great and near-great Canadian rock acts have absolutely, unequivocally refused to cross that darn picket line, Grey Cup or no Grey Cup.’
    • ‘Nature is a darn sight better and more thorough than any yard broom when it comes to clearing up leaves.’
    • ‘The stories themselves I thought were darn interesting.’
    • ‘But the basic problem is that the Space Shuttle is just too darned expensive and inefficient as a reliable space transportation system.’
    • ‘Nestled just off the main drag of expat ghetto Holland Village, Original Sin offers laid-back ambience, attentive staff - and darn good food.’
    • ‘I like boots and I would have another pair if they weren't so darn expensive.’
    • ‘I thought about going into a course, but they're are either darn expensive or way too basic.’
    • ‘They reckon running a mobile phone in Nigeria is just too darned expensive.’
    • ‘I think we would have sold more had the weak Dollar not made them so darn expensive for the American buyers.’
    • ‘What is a lot more practical, and a darn sight more convenient, is to get a computer to simulate these immersion aspects for us.’
    • ‘You can grow tobacco, and you may be able to grow a moustache, but I'll be darned if you can ‘grow’ the economy.’
    • ‘That's a long way from the top-notch victories he served up a few years ago, but it's a darn sight better than the dismal showings he's had the last two years.’
    • ‘One of the best titles in the ongoing Asia Extreme season, it's a darn sight more entertaining than most American genre films of recent months.’
    • ‘I mean, before you tell a tour player something about his golf swing, you'd better be darned sure you know what you're talking about.’
    • ‘It is a darn shame he did not go to his own electorate.’
    • ‘And that's all thanks to what most people call the best darn thing ever; beer.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, fresh fruit in the upper Midwest is darn, darn expensive - unless you go to Eisenberg's.’
    • ‘If you follow my diet, you may not lose weight but, darn it, you can always blame it on someone or something else.’
    • ‘The obvious question it doesn't ask Linux developers is, if it's so darned expensive, why are you doing this to yourselves?’
    • ‘Greenleaf Forest was a pretty darn average, and therefore a pretty darn boring forest.’
    • ‘So I hope they have a happy Christmas, because they will have a darn hard new year.’

Pronunciation

darn

/dɑːn/