Definition of damson in English:

damson

noun

  • 1A small purple-black fruit similar to the plum.

    as modifier ‘damson jam’
    • ‘Whipping up enthusiasm at the Rural Forum as well as a delicious damson syllabub was Cumbrian chef and local food historian John Crouch.’
    • ‘The hedgerows are rich with fruit, elderberries, blackberries, sloes, hips and damsons.’
    • ‘At this year's festival there'll be damson jam, bottled damsons, wine, gin, beer and syrup, chocolates, ice cream - and even damson bread.’
    • ‘European-type plums include the prunes and damsons: ‘Italian’ and ‘Stanley’ are two of the most famous.’
    • ‘Like the cherries, the gin-soaked damsons also retain their stone so that the fruit keeps its shape.’
    • ‘Dense damson and winter berry fruits make this an ideal food accompaniment.’
    • ‘After a brief potted history of the damson, owner Michael Walsh invited the royal guest to sample his damson gin, to which the parched Prince quipped: ‘I thought you would never ask!’’
    • ‘There are damsons in other parts of the British Isles, but the flavour of the smaller Westmorland damson is said to be second to none.’
    • ‘In fact, he bought the wood today, but damson picking and jelly making prevented him starting on that project yet.’
    • ‘Relishes such as wild cherry and bramble or damson jelly and gin - which goes very well with game - are very popular, too.’
    • ‘Add the brandy and flambé. Add damson purée so that the breasts are lightly coated all over.’
    • ‘Witherslack's Windfall Co-Operative is adding value to the local damson crop by making handmade preserves with fruit from orchards within the parish.’
    • ‘They sat at the small table before the fire and feasted on roast beef, stewed winter vegetables, chunks of fine white bread, and damson preserves.’
    • ‘Adding cooking apples or damsons will ensure a perfect set in jam or jelly because of these fruits' high pectin levels.’
    • ‘The beautifully poached damsons, greengages and plums which accompanied them were ambrosial enough to serve on their own.’
    • ‘There are still strawberries, late and ripe, to go with the wild blackberries; Victoria plums and damsons are easy enough to find and even the odd greengage or two.’
    • ‘Other fruits, such as damsons, apples, pears, and peaches, were also made into marmalades.’
    • ‘For a crop of apples, pears, plums, damsons, gages or cherries, which are left outside all year round, try dwarf and pyramid fruit trees.’
    • ‘There was great cheese, baked rice with damson jam and nutmeg and golden syrup pudding.’
    • ‘Michaelmas had come, with its fragrant basketfuls of purple damsons, and its paler purple daisies’.’
    1. 1.1mass noun A dark purple colour.
      • ‘Autumnal shades abound, burnished orange; mauve; burnt umber; ochre; sage green and damson, preferably all in the one outfit.’
      • ‘Swoop on the remaining bottles of this brilliant discounted sweet damson plum-packed red, 50 per cent garnacha to 50 per cent tempranillo.’
      • ‘The wine list is long, the ale is real, and the upstairs dining room - all damson walls and wonky polished floorboards - overlooks the town.’
      • ‘Those of you who remember the lime and ginger scheme will be pleased to hear that it has been redone using damson, with gold trimming.’
      • ‘If it's a winter wedding, could you wear a berry coloured gown, damson or even red?’
  • 2The small deciduous tree which bears damsons, probably derived from the bullace.

    Prunus domestica subsp. insititia (or P. damascena), family Rosaceae

    • ‘The fruit of the damson tree is useful only if you like damson jam - but the blossom, which is out right now, is the most lovely sight.’
    • ‘IT is damson blossom time in the Lyth Valley and Damson Day is a celebration of this very fact.’
    • ‘Britain took a more prominent role than other European countries in developing the cultivation of improved kinds of damson.’
    • ‘The reserve contains the remains of an apple and damson orchard.’
    • ‘Whilst ornamental cherries produce no edible crop, the blossom of apples, pears, plums and damsons is usually followed by fruit worth harvesting.’

Origin

Late Middle English damascene, from Latin damascenum (prunum) ‘(plum) of Damascus’. Compare with Damascene and damask.

Pronunciation

damson

/ˈdamz(ə)n/