Definition of damage in English:

damage

noun

  • 1mass noun Physical harm that impairs the value, usefulness, or normal function of something.

    ‘bombing caused extensive damage to the town’
    • ‘The U.S. embassy building sustained extensive structural damage.’
    • ‘US Army Air Corps officers believed that bomb damage resulted primarily from blast effects.’
    • ‘One of the most common cartilage injuries is damage to the fibrocartilage in the knee joint.’
    • ‘Prompt treatment with steroids may prevent further irreversible nerve damage.’
    • ‘Extensive flood damage has closed a 20-block section of downtown Richmond.’
    • ‘Instead of letting up, they exacerbate their injuries, potentially causing permanent damage.’
    • ‘In addition to being fatal in large enough doses, paracetamol can cause permanent damage to the liver.’
    • ‘Suspected items are not to be used as weapons or to cause bodily harm or damage to personal property in any way.’
    • ‘The move is to prevent vandals from causing further damage to the property.’
    • ‘Deaths, injuries and damage resulting from drink-driving in the city have risen in recent years.’
    • ‘Mavis watched in dismay as youths drinking alcohol gathered in alleys, causing criminal damage to property and vehicles.’
    • ‘These fires cause damage to property and often lead to personal injury.’
    • ‘Thankfully there was only mild smoke damage to the family accommodation.’
    • ‘A car accident left me with whiplash, a concussion, and severe ligament damage.’
    • ‘If this condition persists too long the baby suffers irreparable brain damage.’
    • ‘Coalition bombing, which struck nuclear and chemical weapons installations, also caused serious environmental damage.’
    • ‘Motorists have paid the price of deteriorating roads with damage to their vehicles.’
    • ‘Mr Smith said severe physical illness had resulted in physical damage to the brain.’
    • ‘Apart from a few bruises, we arrived in Hobart with no injuries and no damage to the yacht.’
    • ‘Luckily for us this incident had caused no harm or any damage to the equipment.’
    harm, injury, destruction, vandalization, vandalism
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Detrimental effects.
      ‘the damage to his reputation was considerable’
      • ‘The organization needs to be punished both in the courts and at the ballot box and if this happens then there will be no lasting damage to the peace process.’
      • ‘Does he not see the inner torment and psychological damage this is causing me?’
      • ‘If oil prices remain high, then it will probably be developing countries who will suffer the most economic damage.’
      • ‘Cesare died at the age of 30, far before his sister, but the damage to her reputation had already been done.’
      • ‘It is hard to know what psychological damage another defeat might have inflicted on Chambers.’
      • ‘The damage to the UN and our relations with Europe will have long-term repercussions.’
      • ‘Don't you have deep-rooted psychological damage from your time amongst the other kids?’
      • ‘There will inevitably be damage to the firm's brand value caused by the publicity.’
      • ‘This will do nothing but damage to the villagers and can only be detrimental to the area.’
      • ‘The most voracious debt will invariably do the most psychological damage.’
      • ‘Economists say that the current global oil price hike will be absorbed without too much damage to the economy.’
      • ‘No matter what, this battle will cause tremendous damage to the newspaper vendors.’
      • ‘The articles are seen as causing serious damage to Alexander's reputation.’
      • ‘The misery and human damage our policies have inflicted on some people will never be undone.’
      • ‘However, we are concerned about the psychological damage you have inflicted on your victims.’
      • ‘The institution of monarchy has inflicted terrible psychological damage on him since he was a toddler.’
      • ‘Jim was a sneaky little manipulator, and he could do a lot of damage to me behind my back.’
      • ‘I could find no discernible psychological damage or mental health difficulties.’
      • ‘Being able to let go seems safer psychologically, as damage occurs from a failure to release things.’
      • ‘The Secretary said he deeply regrets the damage done to the reputation of the military and the country as a whole.’
  • 2damagesA sum of money claimed or awarded in compensation for a loss or an injury.

    ‘she was awarded $284,000 in damages’
    • ‘The defendants claim damages which they allege that they suffered from the granting of the injunction.’
    • ‘It also seeks an award of monetary damages for losses incurred as a result of the defendants' unlawful conduct.’
    • ‘Many of the criteria derive from the principles adopted in awarding special damages for personal injuries.’
    • ‘Nor do I think it is necessary to achieve just satisfaction of the claimant's claim that damages should be awarded.’
    • ‘The claimants claim damages for libel against the three defendants in the current action arising out of the article.’
    • ‘I would not, therefore, have been able to award the Claimants any damages even if they had established liability.’
    • ‘As a result, the defendants deny that the plaintiff is entitled to damages for wrongful dismissal.’
    • ‘Before his death, he issued a writ against the defendant claiming damages for personal injuries.’
    • ‘Ms. Jones claims economic losses in the form of loss of income and general damages for her injuries.’
    • ‘Accordingly, the plaintiff's claim for damages for mental distress is dismissed.’
    • ‘The judge had rejected both approaches and awarded £2,500 general damages for loss of amenity.’
    • ‘The Claimant is seeking damages for loss of access to Government Business Grants.’
    • ‘Awards of damages are primarily intended to compensate for loss, whether pecuniary or non-pecuniary.’
    • ‘The second principle may be that the court should not award exemplary or aggravated damages.’
    • ‘However, any right to award damages or other remedy is restricted to courts that already have the power to make such an award.’
    • ‘Put another way, the Federal Court could not award damages in a judicial review proceeding.’
    • ‘He had won damages after the newspaper printed allegations about his involvement with a prostitute.’
    • ‘He or she sues not only for personal injury but for damages for the loss or destruction of the motor vehicle.’
    • ‘I am satisfied that I have jurisdiction to award damages in lieu of an injunction.’
    • ‘The Defendants maintain that the claim for damages for libel must in consequence fail.’
    compensation, recompense, restitution, redress, reparation, reparations
    View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Inflict physical harm on (something) so as to impair its value, usefulness, or normal function.

    ‘the car was badly damaged in the accident’
    • ‘He said all the trees on the land were damaged by vandals four months ago and only replaced this week.’
    • ‘This can result in a severely damaged thyroid gland that functions poorly or not at all.’
    • ‘The forester implored anyone seeing vandals damaging the tree to report it immediately to the police.’
    • ‘Windows were smashed and the roof was damaged but the vandals failed to get into the building.’
    • ‘If your tooth is damaged by accident then the pulp may be affected and get infected.’
    • ‘The accident damaged the propeller and both sets of landing gear at the nose and the rear of the plane.’
    • ‘The empty house became the target for vandals, and five years ago it was badly damaged in a fire.’
    • ‘This is ionizing radiation, which damages genetic material and disrupts cell function.’
    • ‘Swan revealed he was out of action at Turf Moor for almost a year after damaging his cruciate ligament.’
    • ‘Frustrated motorists trying to negotiate traffic calming methods at speed will damage their cars.’
    • ‘A pupil and a teacher suffered minor injuries and the bus was damaged in the accident.’
    • ‘The car doorframe was damaged and the covering around the steering column had been removed.’
    • ‘The end terrace house was badly damaged in the blaze which started when a gas fire set light to a sofa in the front room.’
    • ‘The car was damaged in the accident but the driver did not stop and it was later found burned out.’
    • ‘The vandals broke into the car, damaged the ignition and stole her walking stick.’
    • ‘One of the cottages was severely damaged in November when it was hit by a stolen car.’
    • ‘He also admitted a further charge of making a threat to destroy or damage her home.’
    • ‘The driver escaped serious injury although the car was badly damaged in the impact.’
    • ‘Lomax's car was badly damaged and had a smashed windscreen and two shredded tyres.’
    • ‘Wayne hit the windscreen of a car in the smash, severely damaging his brain.’
    harm, do damage to, injure, mar, deface, mutilate, mangle, impair, blemish, disfigure, vandalize, blight, spoil, defile, desecrate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Have a detrimental effect on.
      ‘the scandal could seriously damage his career’
      • ‘In the long run, arguing may have a damaging effect on your relationship, and on your whole family.’
      • ‘All this was good for morale, but rivalries could have a damaging effect on operational efficiency.’
      • ‘The changed item could do harm to the author by mocking him or damaging his reputation.’
      • ‘In breaking that promise, the party's political credibility is severely damaged.’
      • ‘Few seem prepared to stand up to a prejudice that is both socially and economically damaging.’
      • ‘Suddenly, it appears that once a pitcher passes his prime, one bad season will irreparably damage his reputation.’
      • ‘He is seen as something of a damaged figure in the wake of a number of scandals.’
      • ‘Its effects will be particularly damaging on small businesses and entrepreneurs.’
      • ‘The central theme here is the damaging effect of selfish thinking and behaviour.’
      • ‘The slur made by your critic is a very serious and damaging one to the organization and its unconditional generosity.’
      • ‘The other allegation is a lot trickier and potentially a lot more damaging.’
      • ‘The low price meant I could buy a couple of bottles and not damage my bank balance too badly.’
      • ‘She does not want her name used for fear of damaging her husband's future career.’
      • ‘It was in this capacity that he became embroiled in a damaging series of scandals.’
      • ‘Has the coverage been fair to those who say the bill badly damages free speech?’
      • ‘If you don't do so and we get these side effects, our embryonic sense of hope is badly damaged.’
      • ‘At the very least, it will badly damage the reputation of the hardliners.’
      • ‘At the very least their own career is then finished, at worse it could probably damage their own party.’
      • ‘It severely damages the image and value of sport, whether or not the motivation to use drugs is to improve performance.’
      • ‘Some are unhappy at the possibility of a highly geared offer that could damage the value of their investments.’
      harmful, detrimental, injurious, hurtful, inimical, dangerous, destructive, ruinous, calamitous, disastrous, deleterious, pernicious, ill, bad, evil, baleful, malign, corrupting, malignant, adverse, undesirable, prejudicial, unfavourable, unfortunate, counterproductive
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • the damage is done

    • Used to indicate that it is too late to prevent the occurrence of something unfortunate or undesirable.

      ‘there didn't seem any point in arguing now—the damage was done’
      • ‘Then we got letters saying we could stay until after Christmas, but of course by then the damage is done.’
      • ‘But by the time the bill comes in the door, it is usually too late and the damage is done.’
      • ‘He apologised, but the damage is done as far as I'm concerned.’
      • ‘Now the damage is done, and it is unclear whether Clear Skies, or any other needed environmental reform proposal, will make it through this Congress.’
      • ‘But even if the Tuesday hearing is a legal cure, the damage is done.’
      • ‘He has since backtracked a little and tried to distance himself from his own letter, but the damage is done.’
      • ‘Combine the jumbo popcorn, bag of lollies and mega soft-drink with lounging around and the damage is done.’
      • ‘He doesn't think it likely that the document will become official policy, but others argue the damage is done.’
      • ‘Halfway through the second CD, we revert to studio versions, but the damage is done.’
      • ‘Okay: if she repents then fine, that's for God to decide on in her next life, but the damage is done and nothing now could bring back those people's lives and the pain that their deaths have caused.’
  • what's the damage?

    • humorous, informal Used to ask the cost of something.

      • ‘What's the damage? Forty quid a session.’
      • ‘I'll settle up now, what's the damage?’
      cost, price, expense, charge, bill, account, total
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French, from dam, damne ‘loss or damage’, from Latin damnum ‘loss or hurt’; compare with damn.

Pronunciation

damage

/ˈdamɪdʒ/