Definition of daddy in English:

daddy

noun

informal
  • 1One's father.

    • ‘He looks as if he's scared that his daddy is just around the corner, might have seen him misbehaving and will ground him for a month.’
    • ‘They have three children David, Christopher and Anna, who is the apple of her daddy's eye.’
    • ‘I never thought I was a daddy's girl, that I put my father on a pedestal, but it seems I have.’
    • ‘He's doing much better now, but he clearly misses his daddy.’
    • ‘He was accustomed to his daddy travelling overseas once a month and their reunions were delicious.’
    • ‘He would like to work with his daddy John who has his own computer business.’
    • ‘I heard her tell Rosie that she didn't think daddy loved us anymore.’
    • ‘When I was a little girl, my daddy brought me out to this field to play.’
    • ‘I looked at all the people watching me and saw my daddy waving and smiling.’
    • ‘My mother was the one I'd have fun with, but my daddy protected me.’
    • ‘Maybe they never had a mommy and a daddy who loved them, and maybe they never had opportunities.’
    • ‘I was a real daddy's girl so when my dad passed away it was hard for me.’
    • ‘There's no way in the world I'd leave my little boy without a daddy.’
    • ‘The Sports Day Fathers race was a serious event with all the daddies togged out for the event!’
    • ‘Families, kids, mammies, daddies and dogs are all welcome to watch if they have an interest in the game.’
    • ‘It was just my daddy and me growing up and I just think he's the most wonderful thing.’
    • ‘The air of expectation was almost palpable in the hall as mammies, daddies, grannies, grand dads, sisters, brothers, cousins and friends waited for the show to begin.’
    • ‘He loves his tucker, just like his daddy, so not eating means something is definitely wrong.’
    • ‘He's leaving for another job that pays more, understandably, because he's soon to be a daddy.’
    • ‘My daddy is a bit of a tennis nut himself so I'm following in his footsteps.’
    male parent, begetter, patriarch, paterfamilias
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The oldest, best, or biggest example of something.
      ‘the daddy of all potholes’
      • ‘The daddy of all football trips was the 2002 World Cup in Japan and Korea.’
      • ‘He is not yet a household name, but the daddy of the Russian oligarchy can still turn heads.’
      • ‘In the modern era of full-face crash hats Senna's helmet was the daddy of them all.’
      • ‘This site is possibly the daddy of street art sites, and this is a great worldwide sticker site.’
      • ‘They're named after the daddy of them all, David Coleman, an English sports presenter.’
      • ‘The daddy of food presentation is probably top chef Richard Neat.’
      • ‘I am trying the daddy of all treatments - a Balinese synchronised massage.’
      • ‘But when it comes to sales strengths, Glasgow is the daddy of them all.’
      • ‘The daddy of all solar flares was spotted in November 2003, and ranked X28 on the magnitude scale.’
      • ‘Tennis, cricket, boxing and the daddy of them all, football, bring in huge sums.’
      • ‘The cardoon is surely the daddy of all seed heads.’
      • ‘The bad news for the rest of the Premiership is that the daddy of destroyers is destined to get meaner by the day.’
      • ‘The producers may well have committed the daddy of all errors by casting him as Indiana Jones.’
      • ‘Eddie is the daddy of the round-trip United fans - at the age of 90.’
      • ‘The manufacturer, the daddy of this market, reckons it will pull in a billion dollars revenue this year.’
    2. 1.2the daddy The best or most successful person.
      ‘it's you who's calling the shots now—you're the daddy’

Origin

Early 16th century: from dad + -y.

Pronunciation

daddy

/ˈdadi/