Definition of cynicism in English:

cynicism

noun

mass noun
  • 1An inclination to believe that people are motivated purely by self-interest; scepticism.

    ‘public cynicism about politics’
    • ‘At the same time, there is still a degree of protective cynicism.’
    • ‘Bill's poll-based views, his `parsing' of the truth, contributed to greater cynicism about politicians.’
    • ‘It has contributed to a lowering of investment returns and to public's growing cynicism about pension planning.’
    • ‘I share Rahul Verma's cynicism about the coverage of the Behzti furore.’
    • ‘Their run to the top of the standings is cause for cynicism.’
    • ‘He has presided over a marked increase in public cynicism about politics without suffering significant damage to his own electoral prospects.’
    • ‘The way the trial was handled has increased cynicism among Malays.’
    • ‘Personally however words like ' authentic ' are just to problematic to use without the necessary aura of cynicism.’
    • ‘Gephardt referred to cynicism, loss of faith in the political system and the decline in voting.’
    • ‘Leblance also believes that a rise in cynicism may be to blame for lower interest in student journalism.’
    • ‘The level of cynicism which is brought to many anecdotal accounts used in journalism could equally be levelled at official documentation.’
    • ‘The incompetence, the lies, the bullying, the cynicism, the cover-ups.’
    • ‘MH apparently is unaware of the depths of his own political cynicism.’
    • ‘This administration seems to have a really dangerous and disturbing mix of cynicism and stupidity as their driving motive.’
    • ‘I wonder whether wifely cynicism about a husband's mild illness or impermanent injury doesn't have a lot to do with fear.’
    • ‘He added to the widespread cynicism felt about Australian politicians.’
    • ‘Failure to take meaningful account of the opinions of the people you canvass is a sure way to engender cynicism.’
    • ‘The press, enjoying a freedom also long established in Dutch tradition, denounced the cynicism of the new Directory.’
    • ‘A recurrent thread in the debate over public cynicism is the apparent establishment of "two sets of rules."’
    • ‘If Clemenceau was galvanized by his cynicism, Mandel was paralysed by his.’
    scepticism, doubt, distrust, mistrust, doubtfulness, suspicion, disbelief, incredulity, unbelief, scoffing
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 An inclination to question whether something will happen or whether it is worthwhile; pessimism.
      ‘cynicism about the future’
      • ‘The phenomenon which is denounced in culture criticism as cynicism, as cynical mass business, should be a new access to the soul.’
      • ‘Yet Rogers himself retained a healthy cynicism about the artistic merits of his brainchild.’
      • ‘The cynicism of many claims of cultural relativism can also be seen in the fact that far too often they are for foreign consumption only.’
      • ‘Most books with names like this one are inferior works filled with an ersatz cynicism that pales beside the real article.’
      • ‘Considering the level of cynicism of the citizens with our politicians today, do you really believe talented people would want to join any party now?’
      • ‘But today, the combination of American moralizing at home and cynicism abroad could severely harm relations between Europe and the United States.’
      • ‘Your admitted cynicism is misplaced.’
      • ‘The cynicism, or boredom or maybe numbing hope that it was all going to be over soon - that we'd see the tyrant of Iraq in a coffin.’
      • ‘This would provide a sharp contrast to the mindless cynicism too often preached in the schools today.’
      • ‘Sick of his persona - delicate emotions paired off with caustic cynicism - he creates a bogus doppelganger to hide behind.’
      • ‘For The Book Show journalist Rachel Carbonell read Flat Earth News with a healthy dose of cynicism.’
      • ‘Jha restores our faith - increasingly frayed by cynicism - in the idealism of youth.’
      • ‘While some fat cat cynicism may linger, many are eager to have an inspirational leader that they can admire - and trust.’
      • ‘Not all Mosteller's Bayesian suspicions, some of which verge on cynicism, have proved well founded.’
      • ‘Still, there's no contempt or cynicism in Ryan's attitude here.’
      • ‘They applauded anything that happened on stage; a welcome relief from the normal cynicism of London audiences.’
      • ‘Neither change has yet been enacted because political scruples intervened at some stage in the march of cynicism.’
      • ‘Cynicism was high in the courtroom, however, and the show went on.’
      • ‘He is being driven mad by the all-pervasive cynicism of modern Britain.’
      • ‘Cynicism about the potential for policy to make a difference is widespread.’
  • 2A school of ancient Greek philosophers, the Cynics.

Pronunciation

cynicism

/ˈsɪnɪsɪz(ə)m/