Definition of cynic in English:

cynic

noun

  • 1A person who believes that people are motivated purely by self-interest rather than acting for honourable or unselfish reasons.

    ‘some cynics thought that the controversy was all a publicity stunt’
    • ‘If the cynics are to be believed, the attacks were stage-managed for external consumption.’
    • ‘Only a complete dyed-in-the-wool cynic would suggest the two events could be possibly related.’
    • ‘For some cynics, it is merely the foreign junkets and chance to travel on per diem expenses that draws the attraction of our globalised political classes.’
    • ‘To us ageing cynics Fathers Day is just another materialistic calendar date when people spend hard earned cash on silly presents and cheap cards.’
    • ‘The cynic within suggests that perhaps the status quo is driven by self interest of the major parties who benefit.’
    • ‘I admire the idealism and I hate to be a cynic, but these plans never take human motivations into account.’
    • ‘The cynic in her that questioned his motive had long been silenced.’
    • ‘Cynics may be forgiven for wondering if there is a correlation in some impoverished countries between the desire to be a priest and the desire to eat.’
    • ‘It was suggested by some cynics that the real reason for the aggressive campaign was an attempt to gain a greater market share amongst public sector workers.’
    • ‘Some cynics say the people who subject themselves to potential humiliation on celebrity shows are doing it in hopes of reviving collapsed careers.’
    • ‘As a closet cynic, I will always question their ulterior motives when they dig into their pockets and support various causes.’
    • ‘Cynics argue that sports people and associations are guilty of opportunism during this time of crisis.’
    • ‘Cynics argue that the space race was merely an expression of cold-war animosity.’
    • ‘Modern cynics would have us believe that this turn of events was about something other than freedom.’
    • ‘Even such a cynic as I can't quite believe the unique blend of dishonesty and incompetence.’
    • ‘Inside the bitterest cynic is always a hopeless idealist.’
    • ‘There is no such thing as a free trade deal, only self-interest, the cynic insists.’
    • ‘Cynics have suggested that his confession is an attempt to head off blame.’
    • ‘An independent media source is able to be the voice of the cynic in all of us, and to ask the questions we'd all like to have answered.’
    1. 1.1 A person who questions whether something will happen or whether it is worthwhile.
      ‘the cynics were silenced when the factory opened’
      • ‘The story stands in defiance of cynics who don't believe you can find your soul mate by placing an advert on the web.’
      • ‘You don't have to be much of a cynic to question whether loggers will really be held to their promises.’
      • ‘Everyone, believer and cynic alike, was curious to know what would be said.’
      • ‘They need to prove their critics, the doomsday predictors and the cynics wrong.’
      • ‘For two seasons, the football team have defied the cynics and their critics to regain and retain their status at the top of the league.’
      • ‘Ambitious plans to build tunnels under the runway and the River Almond have been attacked by cynics, who believe the project will never be approved.’
      • ‘Those cynics among you who don't believe in fairy-tales will have to think again.’
      • ‘The performance did not quite convince the cynics, nor some of his closest colleagues in the diplomatic service.’
      • ‘Cynics predict that Hollywood's fixation on teen girls could fade faster than a high school crush.’
      • ‘Cynics had predicted the marriage would fail because of the 16-year age difference.’
      • ‘The result gave the lie to cynics who suggested the result was a foregone conclusion.’
      • ‘He won gold and then confounded the cynics beating the top two Americans within the next couple of weeks.’
      • ‘The prime minister has the opportunity over these next 10 days to confound the cynics.’
      • ‘Call me a cynic, but I can't believe that a contemporary audience could find this anything other than comic.’
      • ‘Shares rise when the majority of investors switch from being market cynics to market supporters.’
      • ‘Last night came the announcement cynics predicted all along: the couple had separated after 16 months.’
      • ‘He said that the expectation and excitement prompted by the Jubilee across the nation has confounded the cynics.’
      • ‘It was inevitable that the critical and commercial success of the film would rile the cynics.’
      sceptic, doubter, doubting thomas, scoffer
      View synonyms
  • 2A member of a school of ancient Greek philosophers founded by Antisthenes, marked by an ostentatious contempt for ease and pleasure. The movement flourished in the 3rd century BC and revived in the 1st century AD.

    • ‘‘I am Diogenes the Cynic,’ replied the philosopher.’
    • ‘Cynicism was originally the philosophy of a group of ancient Greeks called the Cynics, founded by Antisthenes.’
    • ‘It is important to note that the first-century Cynics were very diverse in their teachings and behaviour.’
    • ‘The most famous of the Cynics was Diogenes.’
    • ‘The most extensive ancient report about the Cynics is found in Diogenes Laertius, Lives of the Philosophers, Book 6, although he is not a reliable source.’
    • ‘Nussbaum offers as a heroic exemplar the figure of Diogenes the Cynic, who was said to have answered anyone who asked what city-state he came from by declaring, ‘I am a citizen of the world.’’
    • ‘Mack does not say that Jesus was a Cynic, but he does point out that Jesus' form of speech and many of his themes were similar to those of the Cynics.’
    • ‘The early Christians, drawing on the teachings of the Cynics, Sophists, and Stoics, also told slaves to be submissive and obedient, but recognized an essential inner freedom that transcended external condition.’
    • ‘But if we think of a Stoic like Chrysippus as deeply attracted to the Cynics ' rejection of what is merely conventional, then we will find it easy to think of Chrysippus as a strict cosmopolitan.’
    • ‘The allegory was used by the cynic Antisthenes, a contemporary of Plato, and Diogenes the Cynic.’
    • ‘Free speech advocates from Diogenes the Cynic to Frank Zappa have urged libertarian openness, arguing that unfettered expression is both the right and the duty of free people.’

Origin

Mid 16th century (in cynic (sense 2)): from Latin cynicus, from Greek kunikos; probably originally from Kunosarges, the name of a gymnasium where Antisthenes taught, but popularly taken to mean ‘doglike, churlish’, kuōn, kun-, ‘dog’ becoming a nickname for a Cynic.

Pronunciation

cynic

/ˈsɪnɪk/