Definition of cyberbullying in English:

cyberbullying

noun

  • [mass noun] The use of electronic communication to bully a person, typically by sending messages of an intimidating or threatening nature.

    ‘children may be reluctant to admit to being the victims of cyberbullying’
    • ‘In Britain, authorities are equally concerned about the prospect of cyberbullying.’
    • ‘There are several ways for people to report online crime such as illegal images, cyberbullying or fraud.’
    • ‘The charity is increasingly concerned about cyberbullying, which involves persecution by email, mobile phones or on social networking websites.’
    • ‘Denise was a victim of a growing Internet trend called cyberbullying.’
    • ‘Your article about cyberbullying is a much-needed update for parents and schools on an increasingly epidemic problem.’
    • ‘MySpace issued a statement saying it "does not tolerate cyberbullying" and was cooperating fully with the US attorney.’
    • ‘She is calling for state and federal leaders to push for more action against cyberbullying.’
    • ‘With the influx of cyberbullying cases, school violence and all the underage drinking, does a school have the right to access to your child's Facebook or MySpace account?’
    • ‘With many teenagers using instant messaging, blogs and other websites to keep in contact, the threat of cyberbullying is rising, say experts.’
    • ‘Schools, parents, young people and technology providers all need to work together to tackle cyberbullying.’
    • ‘Large numbers of primary schoolchildren are becoming victims of cyberbullying, according to a survey.’
    • ‘Police accused the boys of cyberbullying and said they will face charges next week at Newburyport District Court.’
    • ‘Nationally we know that around 22 % of secondary school pupils have suffered cyberbullying, but until now we did not know younger age groups were also seriously affected.’
    • ‘Through our cyberbullying campaign we will continue the push to help stamp it out for good.’
    • ‘Sometimes it is easier to engage in cyberbullying than more direct acts because the bully never faces the victim.’
    • ‘Parents were today urged to supervise their children's internet access as research revealed large numbers of primary school pupils are becoming victims of cyberbullying.’
    • ‘As the levels of cyberbullying are increasing it is important to ensure that current anti-bullying strategies incorporate tactics to tackle this.’
    • ‘Her research has shown that parents are most worried by predators and children are most concerned by cyberbullying.’
    • ‘Missouri recently updated its laws against harassment to include cyberbullying.’
    • ‘How they are honoring the teen who took his own life after a tragic case of cyberbullying.’

Pronunciation:

cyberbullying

/ˈsʌɪbəˌbʊlɪɪŋ/