Definition of cut and thrust in English:

cut and thrust

phrase

  • 1A lively and competitive atmosphere or environment.

    ‘the cut and thrust of political debate’
    • ‘It's a different matter being able to cope with the cut and thrust of lively House of Commons debate and Prime Minister's Questions - situations in which he has shown little credibility.’
    • ‘Nowadays, describing oneself as being ‘hurt’ sends the wrong message - of a hands-off preciousness and of not being able to take the cut and thrust of public debate.’
    • ‘Europe's top 30 windsurfers will be among those competing in the final round of the sport's Triple Crown, but there's more to this event than the cut and thrust of competition.’
    • ‘With the above scoreline there for all to see it is hard to pick out those isolated incidents when the visitors displayed the skills required to survive and thrive in the cut and thrust of this competitive league.’
    • ‘Although he enjoyed the cut and thrust of political life he never carried a grudge and was the first to invite the opposition for a drink after a council meeting.’
    • ‘I love the fast moving aspect of the marketing business and the competitive cut and thrust of winning new accounts.’
    • ‘Tullamore are always a tough prospect in this section but home advantage should be availed of as a draw is two points dropped, but Portlaoise can only improve as they get used to the cut and thrust of competition.’
    • ‘Mr Thomas, I don't want to draw you into the cut and thrust of the political arena, but do you agree with Government's position that these bills will contribute to the fight against the spiralling crime rate?’
    • ‘Either McInnes is in for the long haul or he is hopelessly optimistic to believe he can indulge in the cut and thrust of French banter by the time the season ends.’
    • ‘I realised maybe I had lost some of my pizzazz for the cut and thrust of the chamber of the House of Commons.’
    1. 1.1 A situation or sphere of activity regarded as carried out under adversarial conditions.
      ‘the ruthless cut and thrust of the business world’
      • ‘The confidence and flamboyance of these solo works seems well fitted to the dynamic cut and thrust of theatre on the Fringe.’
      • ‘As for Giant's Causeway, can you think of a better European candidate for the cut and thrust of the Breeder's Cup?’
      • ‘And at least the brief excursion from the rigours of the Conference gives the stricken hoards a chance to regain some of their strength for the cut and thrust of the league.’
      • ‘It would, however, leave more options open for the students and allow them time after the cut and thrust of the exams to take more advantage of their points.’
      • ‘Indeed, the cut and thrust of armed combat arrives surprisingly late in the day, as Weir focuses on building up the tension while fleshing out key characters.’
      • ‘Ah yes, winning, something of which Woosnam has done his share in Ryder Cup play, although not, strangely for one so suited to the cut and thrust of head-to-head combat, in any of his eight singles matches.’
      • ‘He loves the cut and thrust, the passion and the no-holds-barred aspect to the contest but he knows that what happens on the pitch often boils over into the stands and onto the streets.’
      • ‘Congress isn't exposed to that cut and thrust of the market - it's getting its millions, it seems, whether or not it proves to be a performer.’
      • ‘These qualities are clearly vital when it comes to the cut and thrust of a life-threatening situation.’
      • ‘It is also true that in the past the Fine Gaelers were never entirely comfortable with the cut and thrust of business.’
      repartee, raillery, ripostes, sallies, swordplay, quips, wisecracks, crosstalk, wordplay
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Pronunciation

cut and thrust

/ˌkʌt ən ˈθrʌst/