Definition of curtain-up in English:

curtain-up

noun

  • The beginning of a stage performance.

    ‘curtain-up is at 8 p.m’
    • ‘At curtain-up, a chorus of Beefeaters and RAF chicks welcomes the royal family onto the stage, with each Windsor dressed in suitable garb.’
    • ‘The theme of good versus evil is crudely handled, with Dr Jekyll transforming into nasty old Hyde within seconds of curtain-up, leaving any ideas of establishing the personalities or building up tension out in the cold.’
    • ‘A few of them are lingering for so long in front of the one entitled Beggars Banquet, they are in danger of missing curtain-up.’
    • ‘I can personally attest to the similarities between the atmospheres backstage before curtain-up and that of a restaurant in the buildup to a dinner service.’
    • ‘The players experience diverse temptations as they rehearse, and with curtain-up approaching, their self knowledge begins to control events in a way that is both funny and sad.’
    • ‘The panto will be staged at Castlecomer Community Centre, with curtain-up nightly at 8 p.m. There will be matinee performances on both Sunday afternoons, for the children.’
    • ‘For the man who was still writing the Dissocia script just days before curtain-up, the process of dealing with a 30-strong chorus is proving a challenge of its own.’
    • ‘The final words before curtain-up were left to Matthew who told the gathered throng: ‘It is a great honour to be at this wonderful old theatre and for my group of dancers to be the first to perform here.’’
    • ‘Hundreds of people had to be ushered out of the Palace Theatre just before curtain-up.’
    • ‘The atmosphere was later compared to the night in London theatres when it was announced before curtain-up that the president had died’.’
    • ‘It was no joke when Cullingworth theatre group CADS lost half of its comic duo only a fortnight before curtain-up for the annual pantomime.’
    • ‘Eric and Gemma visited the theatrical and media make-up department at Oldham College to get in the mood ahead of curtain-up and students gave them a fun makeover.’
    • ‘I was concerned that we would find it a rush to get to the theatre for the 7.45 pm curtain-up, but the staff are well-aware of such things, and the service is perfectly-timed but never rushed.’
    • ‘That strange low buzz, just perceptible beneath the excited hum of a world waiting for curtain-up on the 20,000th showing of The Mousetrap: the longest-running murder mystery saga of all time.’
    • ‘Preparation for the show starts 36 hours before curtain-up, and we will have up to twelve people working around the clock up to the very last minute.’
    • ‘He eventually got to Dublin at 7.15 pm, just a quarter of an hour before curtain-up.’
    • ‘The play will be staged in Rathanna Hall on Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights, March 28-30, with curtain-up nightly at 8.30 pm.’
    • ‘I realised it was ages until curtain-up so I thought I would nip outside for a fag.’
    • ‘Of course Billy was spot-on from curtain-up, grabbing the audience in the palm of his hands while simultaneously squirting them with make-believe doggy wee.’
    • ‘‘We are very proud of the fact that this is our 23rd production,’ she told the Waterford News & Star prior to curtain-up to a full house on Saturday night.’

Pronunciation

curtain-up