Main definitions of curate in English

: curate1curate2

curate1

(also assistant curate)

noun

  • 1A member of the clergy engaged as assistant to a vicar, rector, or parish priest.

    • ‘His first appointment, after further studies in Rome, was as assistant curate in a rustic hamlet 15 miles east of Krakow.’
    • ‘There are lists of rectors, curates, and members who have been ordained in the ministry.’
    • ‘Before joining Holy Rood he was assistant curate at St George's Church in Tyldesley.’
    • ‘He has now been appointed a diocesan curate in Allen, County Kildare.’
    • ‘We take this opportunity to welcome our new curate.’
    • ‘After his studies he returned to Galway Diocese and was appointed a curate in Salthill.’
    • ‘Since 1994 he has served as curate in our parish living in Kiltegan village.’
    • ‘A former baseball player has been appointed an assistant curate.’
    • ‘In 1976 he became assistant curate at Cheam in Surrey and after five years became head of religious studies and chaplain at Radley College in Oxford.’
    • ‘An overawed young curate is having tea with his vicar.’
    • ‘But in a letter to the village magazine, the assistant curate said the work on the windows had used up the funds available for repairs to the church.’
    • ‘Two years ago, he was appointed parish curate completing a total of nine years in Tullow.’
    • ‘A very warm welcome is extended to the new curate for Rathdowney parish.’
    • ‘Two years later he went to England and became a curate.’
    • ‘The local curate expressed understanding at their sense of loss.’
    • ‘In a hard-hitting sermon, the young curate hit out at a lack of parental responsibility in regard to children.’
    • ‘Keeping on the religious track, I must admit I found this link on an Anglican curate's blog.’
    • ‘A campaign has begun in earnest to persuade The Vatican to declare a former curate of Clonmore Parish Holy.’
    • ‘Two years later a meretricious curate pulled them down from the shelf and bought them.’
    • ‘Afterwards he said he was looking forward to taking up his new responsibilities as assistant curate at St Mary's, Barnsley.’
    1. 1.1archaic A minister with pastoral responsibility.

Origin

Middle English: from medieval Latin curatus, from Latin cura ‘care’.

Pronunciation

curate

/ˈkjʊərət/

Main definitions of curate in English

: curate1curate2

curate2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Select, organize, and look after the items in (a collection or exhibition)

    ‘both exhibitions are curated by the Centre's director’
    • ‘Over the past decade, my father has been slowly curating a collection of AIDS posters from all over the world, for the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda.’
    • ‘She continues writing articles, and curating exhibitions in the tradition of experimental art.’
    • ‘Some of her visual material comes from the architects but much is her own, shot as she buzzes around the world curating exhibitions.’
    • ‘He has had ten years of museum experience curating exhibitions, commissioning new works, and developing artist residency programs.’
    • ‘Her true success, however, lies in curating an exhibition that brings to light the power of the sculptors of Venda once more in a show that demands more than one visit.’
    • ‘The exhibition has been curated to fit a number of different thematic topics, which, it is understood, must be seen chronologically.’
    • ‘In curating the exhibition, she took a very hands-off approach, beyond providing the artists the opportunity to resolve new ideas in a public setting.’
    • ‘Building or curating a fossil collection of research value is a task comparable to other commonly recognized tasks, such as setting up a major analytical instrument, and should be similarly evaluated for tenure and promotion purposes.’
    • ‘It is a brilliantly curated exhibition that you can view at home because it's in a book.’
    • ‘Project Rooms, a series of individually curated solo exhibitions, will also make its debut at Art Miami.’
    • ‘To explore this very situation, I am curating a small exhibition at Chambers Fine Art in New York.’
    • ‘While working on current exhibitions, she is also curating an exhibition on contemporary African art for 2003.’
    • ‘He has been curating this collection in the Denver Museum of Nature and Science for many years.’
    • ‘A number of displays were carefully curated, scholarly exhibitions.’
    • ‘She asks how the accomplished writer approached the less familiar task of curating an exhibition that explored the drama of drapery from the early Renaissance.’
    • ‘Plus, I am really excited to be guest curating a large exhibition from the museum's wonderful American Folk Art Collection.’
    • ‘He has curated exhibitions on 20 th-century British artists and the decorative arts.’
    • ‘Tate Britain has curated an excellent exhibition, but, despite the recent extension, the gallery needs more room.’
    • ‘He curated an exhibition a couple of years ago which included a letter on a potsherd in Coptic.’
    • ‘A Question of Place is a finely curated exhibition that provides a platform to a group of artists who have all shared a struggle to find their places in the world.’
    1. 1.1 Select the performers or performances that will feature in (an arts event or programme)
      ‘in past years the festival has been curated by the likes of David Bowie’
      • ‘She has curated many sound performances, exhibitions and events.’
      • ‘The concert is part of this Meltdown Festival curated by Morrissey.’
      • ‘The Observer is media partner of this year's Meltdown festival, which is curated by Patti Smith.’
      • ‘It's a great insane ending to a brilliantly curated day of music.’
      • ‘Six years ago, me and a mate went to the Meltdown festival that John Peel was curating at the South Bank centre.’
      • ‘In 1990 he curated the U.S. participation in two Italian video festivals, "Taormina Arte Video" and "Riccione TTV."’
    2. 1.2 Select, organize, and present (online content, merchandise, information, etc.), typically using professional or expert knowledge.
      ‘people not only want to connect when using a network but they also enjoy getting credit for sharing or curating information’
      ‘a curated alternative to the world's most popular video portal’
      • ‘The service has a huge database of locations curated by users, and you and other participants can trade virtual items that you've collect.’
      • ‘Blueprint is making one of the only serious efforts at collecting, carefully curating and providing information to scientists that would not otherwise be made available in a computer-readable format.’
      • ‘It appears that consumers like the integrated, curated systems and platforms that Apple has created.’
      • ‘It's a curated platform with 225,000 apps.’
      • ‘We're not interested in raw numbers, but ensuring that our valued customers enjoy and appreciate the curated news and the eloquent writers whom we employ, etc. etc.’
      • ‘Mr Hirschorn said that people not only want to connect when using a network but they also enjoy getting credit for sharing or curating information.’
      • ‘The immediate safe comfortable benefits of curated computing are obvious, but If we all shifted towards curated computing...we'd be losing a big part of what makes the internet great.’

Origin

Late 19th century: back-formation from curator.

Pronunciation

curate

/kjʊ(ə)ˈreɪt/