Definition of Crown land in English:

Crown land

noun

mass nounalso Crown lands
  • 1Land belonging to the British Crown.

    ‘revenue from Crown lands’
    • ‘The CRoW Act states that dogs must be kept on short leads during the ground nesting season, but this only applies to public land, whereas most of the Forest is Crown land.’
    • ‘Officers contemplated serving an enforcement notice, but were thwarted when they searched the Land Register and found that the field was Crown land, bought by the Department for Transport for the M11 project.’
    • ‘The reading rooms were built by public subscription and the church hall by church subscription on Crown land donated by Queen Victoria.’
    • ‘On the issue of responsibility, there is a welcome commitment for Government departments to become more responsible for how their activities affect the historic environment, including their management of Crown land.’
    • ‘We can ride anywhere on open Crown land and on tracks through the woodland.’
    • ‘By the time of the inquiry, it was common ground that the site had not been Crown land when the development had been carried out (or at any material time before or since, for that matter).’
    • ‘The site was Crown land and held in the name of the Receiver for the Metropolitan Police Division.’
    1. 1.1 Land belonging to the state in some parts of the Commonwealth.
      • ‘Two of the proposed acquisitions followed applications under the Crown Lands Act to purchase Crown land in respect of which the particular applicant had previously held either grazing licences or leases for grazing purposes.’
      • ‘East Point is Crown land over which his government has full ownership and control.’
      • ‘The working forest initiative determined that B.C. needs to protect and identify the working Crown land base in British Columbia, which is about 45 million hectares, he said.’
      • ‘Concerning wind power generation in Ontario, the Ministry of Natural Resources deals strictly with commercial wind power being developed on Crown land.’
      • ‘I have not checked the Western Australian Mining Act 1933 for this, but does it distinguish, as some Mining Acts do, between mining on private land and mining on Crown land?’
      • ‘A recalcitrant province insists it won't play the odds when deciding how to dispose of Crown land in British Columbia.’
      • ‘With little effective recourse, the Government reluctantly accepted the presence of the squatters and handed over Crown land for nominal lease and licence fees.’
      • ‘‘When you begin to reclassify so-called Crown land and designate that land as Working Forest land in effect you're taking that land off the table,’ Phillip said.’
      • ‘This body of unowned material is, like Crown land, water, and air, an essential part of Canada's riches - spiritual and material.’
      • ‘The minister of mines at the time requested and received a legal opinion as to whether the government could seek compensation for damages to Crown land through the sulphur fumes arbitrator process, just as individual citizens did.’
      • ‘Some claimants were informally aware of the location of their awards and believed they had a right to occupy the land, only to find that it was classified as Crown land.’
      • ‘A court recently upheld the treaty right of Natives to harvest trees on Crown land.’
      • ‘Hunting, fishing and recreational opportunities on Crown land should be ensured for all British Columbians.’
      • ‘One reason for the Germans' eagerness was the fact that only British subjects could buy Crown land.’
      • ‘It's now Crown land on long-term lease, renewed every 10 years on the condition that cabin owners protect the old-growth trees that tower on the steep slopes behind them.’
      • ‘The market is on Crown land and the original huts were financed with the help of NZAid.’
      • ‘The program thus ‘extends forest management to every hectare of Crown land in the province, the only province in Canada where this is true’.’
      • ‘For over 150 years, land values in New Zealand have been collected for public purposes in three main ways: by the sale and lease of Crown land, from a national land tax, and from land-value rates for local government.’