Main definitions of croup in English

: croup1croup2

croup1

noun

  • [mass noun] Inflammation of the larynx and trachea in children, associated with infection and causing breathing difficulties.

    • ‘At least 90% of children with cough have a respiratory tract infection such as a cold, croup, bronchitis, bronchiolitis, whooping cough, or pneumonia.’
    • ‘In children with croup, viral infection causes this area to become inflamed and edematous, which can lead to obstruction.’
    • ‘Certain infections in children, most notably croup and epiglottitis, can also cause airway obstruction.’
    • ‘Diagnosis was delayed with epiglottitis considered only after standard treatment for croup resulted in no clinical improvement.’
    • ‘Steam often helps children with mild cases of croup to breathe easier.’
    • ‘While the birth of a child is often a special time for families for women it is also a time characterised by colic, croup, cracked nipples, six feeds a day and sheer physical exhaustion.’
    • ‘They are responsible not just for coughing and sniffling, but also for sore throat, croup, pharyngitis, laryngitis and bronchitis.’
    • ‘For newborns, colds can quickly develop into croup, pneumonia or another serious illness.’
    • ‘Adenovirus often affects the lower respiratory tract as well, causing bronchiolitis, croup, or viral pneumonia, which is less common but can cause serious illness in infants.’
    • ‘Most children with croup get better without problems.’
    • ‘Pneumonia, diarrhoea and croup are the other major complications precipitated by measles, which contribute to increased mortality.’
    • ‘In children, fever associated with dyspnea usually implies an infectious cause, such as pneumonia, croup, or bronchiolitis.’
    • ‘Children who are born prematurely or who have a history of lung disease, such as asthma, may develop severe breathing difficulties if they get croup.’
    • ‘These types of virus do not always cause the breathing difficulties associated with croup.’
    • ‘The girl can't seem to stay awake and her breathing sounds raspy, like she might have croup or cholera - both childhood illnesses.’
    • ‘Bronchiolitis was the most common diagnosis, followed by pneumonia and croup.’
    • ‘The same virus that can cause croup also causes the flu and common cold.’
    • ‘Other diagnoses of similar symptoms might be croup, a foreign object in the throat, or other non-serious causes of swelling of the epiglottis.’
    • ‘Adults may simply have a cold with laryngitis, but children may develop croup.’
    • ‘In addition to the effects on the upper airway, the infections that cause croup can result in inflammation further down the airway, including the bronchi (breathing tubes) and the lungs.’

Origin

Mid 18th century: from dialect croup ‘to croak’, of imitative origin.

Pronunciation:

croup

/kruːp/

Main definitions of croup in English

: croup1croup2

croup2

noun

  • The rump or hindquarters, especially of a horse.

    • ‘Length in the neck, shoulder, forearm, croup, and from hip to hock helps a horse take longer strides for his size.’
    • ‘The powerful, level back slopes downward at the croup.’
    • ‘The foals bear his unmistakable stamp; an elegant neck and head, good bone, round croup with a full hip and low tail set and a straight forward, suspended movement.’
    • ‘The horse was still sporting several bald patches due to a skin rash that has clustered near his flank, croup, and hip, but the condition has had no impact on his training.’
    buttocks, behind, backside, rear, rear end, seat, haunches, cheeks
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French croupe, ultimately of Germanic origin and related to crop.

Pronunciation:

croup

/kruːp/