Definition of cross in English:

cross

noun

  • 1A mark, object, or figure formed by two short intersecting lines or pieces (+ or ×)

    ‘place a cross against the preferred choice’
    • ‘She cut an improvised cross from the head of a cork and dampened the ash by adding water.’
    • ‘With the pointed end of a potato peeler or a small, sharp knife, cut out the core of the tomatoes and lightly mark a cross on their undersides.’
    • ‘Initially voters were required to mark as many crosses as there were vacancies and the candidates with greatest support, usually from the same party, were elected.’
    • ‘The cross represents the masculine side of his face, the nought represents the feminine side.’
    • ‘Cut a small cross in the top of each pie, insert a sprig of thyme and lightly brush with milk.’
    • ‘The center of the cross indicates the position of the breakpoints with moderate precision.’
    • ‘The yellow outline and magenta cross mark the best guess of the RADAR team at the location of the Huygens DISR images.’
    • ‘How can they ever expect conditions to change when a short trip to a polling station to mark a cross on a voting paper might make all the difference, but is too much for them?’
    • ‘If George W Bush had enjoyed the right to vote in this country two weeks ago he would have thought twice about putting his cross against any candidate representing the Conservative Party.’
    • ‘Opponents have halted plans for voters in York's next local elections to place their crosses by post.’
    • ‘Torvald checks his letter box and finds some letters and two Business cards from Dr. Rank with black crosses on them.’
    • ‘All I did was put pencil crosses on pieces of paper and put them in a ballot box.’
    • ‘The small cross indicates the position of the Earth when at perihelion (closest approach to the Sun) in early January.’
    • ‘Trapping was carried out in the reedbed with 147 m of mist nets arranged in two lines forming a cross.’
    • ‘Watch any low budget pre-election television show, lay back and listen while the terminally dumb mumble their excuses for not being able to put a cross on a piece of paper and pop it into a battered tin box.’
    • ‘When giving a guest the map of Mantua, why not indicate with a cross where the restaurant you've booked for him is located?’
    • ‘Knead it well then shape it into a ball, cut a cross into the centre, place in a bowl and cover.’
    • ‘It was a map of Hillcrest, marked with numerous crosses.’
    • ‘The ancient Egyptians had the cross as a religious symbol of their Gods.’
    • ‘It is understood that a street map of Brussels with a number of places marked with crosses - including a street near the embassy - was found on him.’
    • ‘They will not meekly give up their power simply because of a few million crosses on pieces of paper.’
    1. 1.1 A cross (×) used to show that something is incorrect or unsatisfactory.
      ‘the class sat quiet, waiting anxiously for the verdict—a tick or a large cross’
      • ‘Use a green tick if the best option was chosen, a yellow tick for a partially correct answer, and a red cross for a totally wrong answer.’
      • ‘And there's ticks and crosses to indicate everyone's preferences.’
      • ‘Put a cross against the wrong answer.’
    2. 1.2 A cross-shaped decoration awarded for personal valour or indicating rank in some orders of knighthood.
      ‘the Military Cross’
      • ‘Since that time there have been a total of 1,354 crosses awarded.’
      • ‘Seven among them were awarded St. George's crosses, the highest and most coveted military order in czarist Russia.’
      • ‘Dempsey served on the Western Front and was awarded the Military Cross for bravery.’
      • ‘Myles proved to be a valiant soldier and was awarded two Papal emblems, a medal and a cross at the end of the war.’
      • ‘He failed to rise in rank beyond corporal, but was awarded the Iron Cross for military bravery.’
      • ‘During his career, he was awarded the Iron Cross by the German army for bravery.’
    3. 1.3 The constellation Crux.
      Also called Southern Cross
  • 2An upright post with a transverse bar, as used in antiquity for crucifixion.

    • ‘This runs counter to the Synoptic story which has the soldiers compelling Simon of Cyrene to carry the cross to Golgotha.’
    • ‘May that which is unholy within me be nailed to the sacrificial cross of crucifixion and may that which pleases you be raised in the holy and blessed hope of the ressurection.’
    • ‘He has also carried a cross that was 4m long and 2m wide for thousands of kilometres around Australia.’
    • ‘Before the cross became a Christian symbol, it already symbolized torture in the Roman Empire.’
    • ‘His duties even called on him to be the first person to try out the cross for the Crucifixion scene.’
    • ‘He is shown as a man who was reluctant to carry the cross, forced by the Romans to do so.’
    • ‘They replaced a decaying wooden Celtic cross that was in a dangerous and hazardous state.’
    • ‘On that occasion an oak cross, on which a neighbour of Raonaid had inscribed her favourite poem, was marked with a knife.’
    • ‘It was a deep black and similar to a Christian cross, except that the top half of the cross had been intersected thrice more, each line smaller than the last.’
    crucifix, rood
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 The cross on which Christ was crucified.
      ‘the sacrifice of Jesus on the cross’
      • ‘An eternal transaction was taking place as Jesus was dying on the Cross.’
      • ‘The foundation of the Church is always the sacrifice of Christ on the Cross.’
      • ‘Everything you have ever done wrong was placed on Jesus as He hung upon the Cross.’
      • ‘The Cross of Christ is the centre of God's entire plan of redemption.’
      • ‘It is because the dogwood was used for the Cross, it is said, that it has not grown straight, or to a large size ever since.’
      • ‘He used his own pain, following the example of Christ on the cross, to share with compassion the pain of others.’
      • ‘Christ encountered her at the very entrance of the church, all bloody and nailed to the Cross.’
      • ‘The cross of Jesus Christ reveals that the very heart of God is mercy and forgiveness.’
      • ‘That's why, with time, they started to represent the Christ with a beard and later, they represented him on the cross.’
      • ‘He could have saved himself, but he did not for it was through his death on the Cross that God was going to save the world.’
      • ‘The lintel shows Jesus carrying the cross on the way to Calvary.’
      • ‘Your old sinful life was put to death on the Cross with Jesus, and buried with him in the grave.’
      • ‘The cross of Christ, theologically speaking, was not an end in itself.’
      • ‘This was an expression of all the sins of the world put into one cup and poured out on Christ while He was on the Cross.’
      • ‘As opposed to the resurrection, the cross symbolises crucifixion.’
      • ‘As Jesus hung upon the Cross, He hung there as the representative Man - the last of the Adamic race.’
      • ‘Just when we figure out the cross and empty tomb, something happens to remind us that Jesus' death and resurrection are a mystery.’
      • ‘I believe that Jesus Christ died on the cross to cleanse me from sin.’
      • ‘At least twenty people have offered to sell me a piece of the true cross.’
      • ‘These include a fragmented image of the crucifixion with parts of Christ's body in pieces around the cross.’
    2. 2.2 A cross as an emblem of Christianity.
      ‘she wore a cross around her neck’
      • ‘To the early Christians and Byzantines, it was called the gammadion cross, and it figured prominently in their artwork.’
      • ‘Lulu wears a tiny gold cross around her neck.’
      • ‘Above them a cluster of crosses mark graves and beyond them a few people cross onto a ship.’
      • ‘It is proposed to build, plaster and cap a perimeter wall and erect a Cross on completion of the work.’
      • ‘Like many of the troops I met during the war, she wore a cross around her neck.’
      • ‘A lot of Christians wear crosses around their necks.’
      • ‘She was no longer biting her fingernail, but fidgeting with the gold cross on a chain around her neck.’
      • ‘Dozens of people turned up on Otley Chevin at the weekend to help pull the Easter Cross into place.’
      • ‘Though our foreheads are marked with a black, ashen cross, Matthew warns us to practice our piety in secret.’
      • ‘A bible hung from his belt, and he wore a cross around his neck.’
      • ‘A special prayer around the Cross for young people takes place for the Lenten Season.’
      • ‘He buried them out back, behind the small cabin, forming two wooden crosses out of pieces of wood, spliced together with strips of rawhide.’
      • ‘The life-size crosses and figures of saints were one of the great forms of benefaction in the eleventh century and are described in churches across England.’
      • ‘In England, hot cross buns are traditionally eaten on Good Friday; they are marked on top with a cross, either cut in the dough or composed of strips of pastry.’
      • ‘Noting my covetousness, a native woman lifted her cross off her neck and placed it around mine.’
      • ‘The cross as a symbol of Christianity is everywhere.’
      • ‘One way she does this is by stripping down, multiplying, and opening up the central symbol of Christianity, the cross.’
      • ‘He said this cross was built in the 1950s to mark a holy year.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, through an open doorway, the reader can see hundreds of crosses lining the general's backyard in neat rows.’
      • ‘This day provides an opportunity to acknowledge grief and sorrow, and to teach why Christians use a cross as a symbol.’
    3. 2.3
      short for sign of the cross (see sign)
      • ‘Then he stands straight and with his left hand holding out his staff towards us, makes a cross in the air, speaking the ritual he has been taught for occasions such as this’
      • ‘His hand touched his forehead, then tapped the front of his black suit three more times to form a cross.’
      • ‘He muttered what sounded like a prayer and made a cross on himself.’
      • ‘She bowed her head and made a cross over her chest in reverence of the departed woman.’
    4. 2.4 A staff surmounted by a cross carried in religious processions and on ceremonial occasions before an archbishop.
      • ‘They then carried a cross through the streets to the Methodist Church for a united act of worship led by the Rev Mary Teed.’
      • ‘The two illustrated here are probably St Barbara with the tower and martyr's palm, and an unidentified bishop-saint carrying the Greek Orthodox cross.’
      • ‘Then the Vicar-General and some of the Franciscan fathers came ashore carrying two crosses in procession and singing the Te Deum.’
      • ‘He was extremely poor, illiterate and kept himself to himself, but liked attending church processions and carrying the cross or the pictures of Saints.’
      • ‘On the following day the cross will be carried by the youth of the area to the Cathedral.’
      • ‘Leading the procession and holding the cross aloft were Mrs. Anne Enright from the western side and Patrick Egan from Tarmons side.’
      • ‘Only one of the items shown, the painted processional cross mentioned earlier, was loaned by another museum.’
      • ‘With his left hand he supports over his left shoulder a staff topped by a cross, and holds an open scroll with an inscription written in black in Greek capitals.’
    5. 2.5 Something unavoidable that has to be endured.
      ‘she's just a cross we have to bear’
      • ‘This feeling coupled with the feeling of guilt that they are in some way or fashion responsible for their charge's condition is indeed a difficult cross to bear.’
      • ‘If that was what it took, I had to accept it and carry the cross.’
      • ‘It was during their short time in Shrule prior to moving to Cong that they suffered a great cross with the sudden death of their only child, Ann Marie, at the age of two years.’
      • ‘You had many a cross to carry but you carried on and helped me to carry my cross so many times.’
      • ‘We therefore call upon all troublesome nurses to quit being callow in our hospitals, carry the cross and emulate Nightingale, the mother of nursing.’
      • ‘He also died suddenly at a young age in 1987, and this was a big cross for Aggie to carry at the time.’
      • ‘But no sane person can tell me that a mother deserves to be made carry the cross that Mrs. McGinley now carries.’
      • ‘Who are those who are willing to carry their cross and die daily?’
      • ‘She said he had carried his cross in silence and with dignity and they had helped each other along the way.’
      • ‘Many crosses he was to carry before his passing to his eternal reward at the age of 90 years.’
      • ‘Like all of us he too carried crosses - he found it very hard to accept the long illness of his father Murty whom he found difficult to even visit at times.’
      • ‘She trusted him, of course, but it was her secret, her burden, her cross to bear.’
      • ‘David's mother carried thoughts of Michael around like a cross.’
      • ‘The lone researcher bears a large emotional burden, and there is simply no denying that this is a cross many PhD students will have to carry.’
      • ‘All the suffering they endured they accepted as their way of carrying the cross.’
      • ‘Sincere faith and fortitude in the will of God gave him the strength to carry his cross.’
      • ‘He may well be left to carry the cross he so recklessly laid on the shoulders of others.’
      • ‘No human should have to endure the cross of suffering.’
      • ‘She always had a bright outlook on life even up to the end and carried bravely any crosses sent her way, including the death of her daughter, Ann in 1998.’
      • ‘I pray they can carry their particular cross as we all carry ours.’
      burden, trouble, worry, trial, tribulation, affliction, curse, bane, hardship
      View synonyms
  • 3An animal or plant resulting from cross-breeding; a hybrid.

    ‘a Galloway and shorthorn cross’
    • ‘The first step is to make a cross between two parent plants.’
    • ‘The farm's herd is a cross between the indigenous Wagyu and another quality export from Scotland, the Aberdeen Angus.’
    • ‘These bitsy buds are a cross between broccoli and gai lan.’
    • ‘Grandifloras are a cross between hybrid teas and floribundas.’
    • ‘That clone was created from a cross between two strains from North and South Germany that were distinct from the clones we analyzed here.’
    • ‘He said animals had to be 16 hands 3ins minimum and a cross between a heavy working breed and a thoroughbred.’
    • ‘A genetic map constructed using a cross between the two M. grisea strains used in this study revealed a high degree of synteny between the two genomes.’
    • ‘Draft animals, especially the ubiquitous dzo, a cross between a yak and a cow, play a central part in the farming economy.’
    • ‘We assume that the parents that initiate the cross are pure inbred lines.’
    • ‘Hybrids such as the mule, a cross between a donkey and a horse, are sterile.’
    • ‘Most hybrid striped bass that consumers purchase are a cross between female white bass and male striped bass.’
    • ‘Hybrids are more difficult to spot because they are a cross between the native and Spanish varieties, and the colours vary in shades’
    hybrid, hybridization, cross-breed, mixed breed, half-breed, half blood, mixture, amalgam, blend, combination, composite, conglomerate
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1a cross between A mixture or compromise of two things.
      ‘the system is a cross between a monorail and a conventional railway’
      • ‘He was an imposing figure, a cross between Humpty Dumpty and a brigadier, who had rowed hard in his youth.’
      • ‘It's a brilliant cross between stealth, puzzle and platform genres that you really have to play to believe.’
      • ‘This is the ideal present for someone with a slightly sadistic nature as a cross between a plant and a pet.’
      • ‘It's been described as a cross between orienteering and sailing, of course with the extra dimension of being able to go up and down, something you don't wish to do in a sailing boat.’
      • ‘The movie becomes a cross between a serious life drama and a quirky romantic comedy.’
      • ‘With their five-wheel frame and their medium-height buckle cuff, they are a cross between a racing skate and recreational one.’
      • ‘It is a cross between a corporation and a partnership.’
      • ‘In many respects, this form of analysis represents a cross between a psychological profile and stereotyping.’
      • ‘His hair was scraggly and slightly curly, its color a cross between brown and black.’
      • ‘That place was like a cross between hell and jail.’
      • ‘Weblogs, or blogs for short, are a cross between a diary, a web site, and an online community.’
      • ‘Covered only from waist down by white sheets, they evoked a cross between Greek statues and hospital patients.’
      • ‘Clearly, the closer a family car resembles a cross between a combine harvester and a rocket launcher, the happier today's families are.’
      • ‘He describes his life as a cross between being a GP, vicar and social worker - ‘which is fine, but not very challenging’.’
      • ‘The jail was a cross between a political headquarters and an industrial plant.’
      • ‘It's a cross between rap and line dancing if you can categorise it at all.’
      • ‘His face was growing old quickly, his hair a cross between gray and brown.’
      • ‘Orchestral life, at its best, is a cross between summer camp and labour camp.’
      • ‘He led her out of the bedroom and into something that looked like a cross between a library, a laboratory, and a study.’
      mixture, blend, mingling, combination, compound, fusion, composition, concoction, brew, alloy, merger, union, amalgamation, amalgam, coalition, hybrid
      View synonyms
  • 4Soccer
    A pass of the ball across the field towards the centre close to one's opponents' goal.

    ‘Beckham's low cross was turned into the net by Cole’
    • ‘He looks in an off-side position but the linesman disagrees, and so he can ping another cross in.’
    • ‘Only a few minutes had gone when the Welshman flung in an inviting right-foot cross to the back post.’
    • ‘The former Rochdale man delivered a pin-point low cross for top-scorer Foster to turn home from close range.’
    • ‘He creates so many goals for others with his precision crosses and his sweeping through balls.’
    • ‘His limp cross was kicked towards the Leeds goal by Ian Harte and only a smart save by Nigel Martyn kept things equal.’
    1. 4.1Boxing A blow given with a crosswise movement of the fist.
      ‘a right cross’
      • ‘He had an excellent one-two combination and a surprisingly stiff right cross, which enabled him to score a number of early knockouts.’
      • ‘Faster than I could recover, he whipped his massive fist into a right cross that took me in the jaw.’
      • ‘Jason kneed him in the stomach before following the blow with a right cross to his mouth.’
      • ‘The messages from Moore's brain to the rest of his body were immediately scrambled by the perfectly timed right cross, and Moore fell down to the canvas in a heap.’
      • ‘He was very mobile for a man his size and he had a pretty fair right cross.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Go or extend across or to the other side of (an area, stretch of water, etc.)

    ‘she has crossed the Atlantic twice’
    ‘two paths crossed the field’
    figurative ‘a shadow of apprehension crossed her face’
    no object ‘we crossed over the bridge’
    • ‘When they had crossed to the far side of the square, they came to a straw colored building with a thatched roof.’
    • ‘He stretched enormously, crossed to the washstand, and poured hot water into the basin, then frowned.’
    • ‘She quickly crossed to the other side of the street and walked towards her house.’
    • ‘A single road crosses the area.’
    • ‘Rivers and streams along the routes of the Roman roads were crossed by bridges.’
    • ‘The vehicle sped away, going through red traffic lights at 50 mph in a 30 mph area before crossing the Pheasant roundabout on the wrong side.’
    • ‘Sarah ended her vigil at Sofia's side and crossed the room to her fiancé.’
    • ‘The glint of a smile briefly crosses his face when asked if he's ready for the playoffs.’
    • ‘Then turning again toward Christina, a frown crossed the woman's stern features.’
    • ‘It was also hazardous for pedestrians to cross Cemetery Road, and she suggested traffic lights and a pelican crossing were needed.’
    • ‘As all three crossed to the other side of the road, Daniel saw a speeding car, then heard the sound of a car hit Michael.’
    • ‘Residents were also concerned that it would mean children having to cross New Road Side - even though the council has said a pedestrian crossing would be installed.’
    • ‘His car crossed to the wrong side of the road and collided with a tree.’
    • ‘She crossed to the left side of the road before going on to Coltman Street.’
    • ‘But to get there you have to cross a treacherous stretch of water called Jack Sound.’
    • ‘I crossed to the other side of the road, and went along that one for a while.’
    • ‘A weak, forced smile crossed the bruised and grimy face, " Hey.’
    • ‘We crossed to the other side of the balcony, where there was a second door.’
    • ‘In their separate rooms, the exact same smirk crossed both of their faces.’
    • ‘Determined, she waited for a clear road before crossing the busiest stretch in the city to the other side.’
    travel across, go across, cut across, make one's way across, traverse, range over, tramp over, wander over
    span, bridge, arch, ford
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Go across or climb over (an obstacle or boundary)
      ‘he attempted to cross the border into Jordan’
      no object ‘we crossed over a stile’
      • ‘They said a policeman kicked a civilian when he attempted to cross the barriers set up at the corner of Queen and Henry Streets.’
      • ‘Asking spectators to cross national boundaries, and especially seas, is putting far to heavy a financial burden on them.’
      • ‘The drivers' biggest challenges will be the Western Sahara with no metalled roads and crossing a minefield in Mauritania.’
      • ‘I hope this will be an opportunity to cross international boundaries and express practical help and love for those who are bereft and homeless.’
      • ‘The trolley is fitted with a sensor which is triggered if it crosses the supermarket's boundaries, causing a shield to drop down over the wheels and stop the runaway cart.’
      • ‘Tens of thousands of mobile phone customers are believed to be caught in the trap of incurring international charges every time they cross the Border for work and leisure.’
      • ‘The quest to bring John Lillie to justice took around 10 years and crossed international boundaries.’
      • ‘The row erupted among a group of about 10 men - at least two of whom had crossed the nearby Border from the south.’
      • ‘Police officers were stationed along the route every hundred yards preventing anyone from crossing the boundary.’
      • ‘They then crossed the border and got into a vehicle, which drove them to France.’
      • ‘Hundreds die during attempts to cross the borders illegally.’
      • ‘First of all, any architectural or engineering work has a technical or practical purpose, for example to span a river, to cross an obstacle.’
      • ‘Police are reminding all motorists they should not attempt to cross the barriers if they are in any doubt about the safety of the conditions.’
      • ‘But persuading our English neighbours to cross the Border is a bigger problem than anyone thought.’
      • ‘At the time the Russians said he had been shot by a border guard while crossing the frontier with Finland.’
      • ‘She managed to cross all obstacles on the medium course, and liked it so much that she decided to try the big one too.’
      • ‘The alleged bomber claims to have illegally crossed the Mexican border into the US.’
      • ‘How fluently can creative artists cross global boundaries?’
      • ‘When I was at school and less than well behaved, a yell in the ear and slap of the ruler on my wrist told me I'd crossed the boundaries of acceptability.’
      • ‘I didn't get a sense of having crossed some life-changing boundary.’
      travel across, go across, cut across, make one's way across, traverse, range over, tramp over, wander over
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2cross overno object (especially of an artist or an artistic style or work) begin to appeal to a different audience, especially a wider one.
      ‘a talented animator who crossed over to live action’
      • ‘This time the four-time Grammy award-winner crosses over into the genre of jazz with his first album of standard tunes.’
      • ‘His album is out there at the moment getting people used to the raw style, which is always lost as an artist crosses over into the mainstream market.’
      • ‘‘Christian rock’ is its own musical genre in America, but it rarely crosses over into the mainstream.’
      • ‘When he crosses over to painting from his preferred medium of printmaking, his sensibility is divergent and different.’
      • ‘That could also mean that high art is agnostic or that it crosses over to all faiths.’
      • ‘When these niche products are successful with a broad audience, of course, the marginal crosses over into the mainstream.’
      • ‘The publishers believe this is a book that crosses over from business into pop culture.’
      • ‘Art is symbolic, and crosses over into many different genres.’
      • ‘It is a really great toy and it crosses over lines - people who are religious like it because it is a historical Jesus and is not a parody in any way.’
      • ‘Her music may be deep-rooted in the teen market but her image crosses over into the adult market where she is often shown on adult magazine covers posing seductively while still maintaining an ‘innocence’.’
      • ‘They were obviously trying to play down the gay content and cross over to straight audiences.’
      • ‘People find it very difficult to deal with subject matter that crosses over from one pigeonhole into another.’
      • ‘They may have been featured on the South Bank Show, but the duo have been trying to cross over to a mass audience for a while now without much success.’
      • ‘I think our music crosses over because we're tapping into a romantic yearning that so many people have.’
      • ‘He writes true-to-life books, which cross over well from a teenage to adult audience.’
      • ‘It may be the film that finally crosses over to the mainstream.’
  • 2no object Pass in an opposite or different direction; intersect.

    ‘the two lines cross at 90°’
    • ‘There were two tubes crossing in different directions.’
    • ‘Our paths never crossed again after playgroup anyway.’
    • ‘Noticing this, he squeezed in as close as possible to the vehicle he was passing and we crossed with no more than a couple of feet to spare.’
    intersect, meet, join, connect, criss-cross, interweave, intertwine
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1with object Cause to intersect or lie crosswise.
      ‘cross the cables in opposing directions’
      ‘Michele sat back and crossed her arms’
      • ‘He casually settled into a worn orange couch, and crossed his long, lithe legs.’
      • ‘He waved his hands back and forth for a few minutes before jumping onto the bed and sitting on his with his legs crossed underneath him.’
      • ‘Both of her arms crossed each other across her chest, the daggers she held lay lazily over her shoulders on each side.’
      • ‘‘The same thing I told the last three guys that came in here,’ she said, crossing her arms tighter across her chest.’
      • ‘He leans back, placing his hands on the back of his head and crossing one of his legs over the other.’
      • ‘He sat down, crossed and uncrossed his legs, and tried to pick up the flagging vibe.’
      • ‘I crossed my room and flicked on my stereo, turning it up as loud as it could then I sat on my bed with my legs crossed underneath me.’
      • ‘Gem crossed her two, graceful arms over her raised chest.’
      • ‘He crossed his well toned arms as looked her up and down, and made no move to hide his snicker.’
      • ‘He sat back, crossed his own supple young arms and watched, awe struck by the creative process of life.’
      • ‘He fidgets in his chair like a man unaccustomed to sitting still, crossing and uncrossing his legs, slipping his socked feet underneath him.’
      • ‘Finally Emily sat back down on the couch next to Reese, crossing her bony, slender legs as she spoke.’
      • ‘Sitting down, and crossing her legs she closed her eyes and concentrated.’
      • ‘I crossed my legs Indian-style and took a drag of my cigarette before asking him what it was about.’
      • ‘Setting the tray down in the middle of the rug, David sat, crossing his legs.’
      • ‘‘You're forgetting one very important thing,’ implied Tyler, crossing his lean, tanned arms.’
      • ‘Her long floral dress bunched up as she crossed her long tan legs.’
      • ‘She pulled a nearby seat in front of her and stuck her legs on it, crossed one upon the other, and sipped the drink.’
      • ‘In addition, he showed how to decode body language: crossing one's legs when sitting was a sign of uneasiness, while standing with one's legs wide apart was the hallmark of a braggart.’
      • ‘She crossed her long thin legs and rested her chin on her hands.’
    2. 2.2 (of a letter) be dispatched before receipt of another from the person being written to.
      ‘our letters crossed’
      • ‘It would appear that our letters crossed and I therefore repeated this request on 15th May.’
      • ‘Maybe the letters crossed over in the post.’
      • ‘A letter from Alstom also of 18 June probably crossed with that letter.’
  • 3Draw a line or lines across; mark with a cross.

    ‘voters should ask one question before they cross today's ballot paper’
    • ‘She told me to heighten the letter i and to cross my t's so that the horizontal bar is equally long on both sides of the vertical line.’
    1. 3.1British Mark or annotate (a cheque), typically by drawing a pair of parallel lines across it, to indicate that it must be paid into a named bank account.
      ‘a crossed cheque’
      • ‘The holder is entitled to cross a cheque even if an original crossing, usually printed on the cheque, has been opened by the drawer.’
      • ‘Subcontractors are also advised to pay workers by auto pay or crossed cheques.’
      • ‘Extreme caution is needed where cheques are crossed and marked account payee only.’
      • ‘This means that it is at the risk of the bank to accept a crossed cheque into someone else's account when it is written in favour of somebody else, which means that banks don't generally accept them.’
      • ‘Anyone wishing to contribute as requested to should have cheques crossed and made payable to the Athletic Club.’
    2. 3.2cross someone/something off Delete a name or item on a list as being no longer required or involved.
      ‘Liz crossed off the days on the calendar’
      • ‘Don't cross me off the social list just yet, though.’
      • ‘And if they dismiss you as some kind of lunatic, cross them off your holiday list and go spend the money you would have spent on their gift on yourself.’
      • ‘Personally, I'd be glad to cross that worry off the list.’
      • ‘He looked down at the words he had written in the notebook and crossed a name off a list that was just starting to grow.’
      • ‘Incidentally I wasn't serious when I suggested we and our friends might cross North Dakota off our list of prospective holiday destinations this summer.’
      • ‘Oh, and we can cross Erica off the list of suspects now.’
      • ‘The New Orleans Saints are the obvious pick but all of us are rooting for them so let's cross them off the list.’
      • ‘He couldn't hear or see anyone, so he took the liberty of crossing a name off the paper.’
      • ‘Quebec election bureaucrats have started crossing names off nomination papers with great and possibly unfair abandon.’
      • ‘Since then each day seems to have rolled into another before I've had chance to catch my breath and cross things off the To Do List.’
      • ‘The students roar with approval, and, even though the principal expels her and crosses her name off the ballot, her fellow students reject the two ‘major’ candidates and vote for her anyway.’
      • ‘The auction will make the perfect opportunity to gather some Christmas presents and cross some names off that list.’
      • ‘I was asked to go and cross my name off the list, because Gordon Copeland knew I was here.’
      • ‘He also crossed his name off of the list of the dead.’
      • ‘If you're still sending a card to someone you haven't seen since Guide camp, it's probably time to cross them off your list.’
      • ‘He told me, and I nodded, understanding, while mentally crossing Oliver off the list.’
      • ‘Depending on your allergy, you can automatically cross some restaurants off your list.’
      • ‘A guy had a whole table of laboratory glassware and I was able to cross an item off my list of lifetime goals: I now own a bell jar.’
      • ‘If you really want to help, volunteer to make dinner or do laundry so Mom can cross a few things off her list.’
      • ‘Jack Shanahan watched as the guard crossed his name off the list at the doorstep of Belle Henderson's three story home.’
    3. 3.3cross something out/through Delete an incorrect or inapplicable word or phrase by drawing a line through it.
      ‘cross out any portions which do not apply’
      • ‘People will cross out words and write above them.’
      • ‘You can read it anywhere, you can highlight words or cross them out and scribble your own comments alongside.’
      • ‘What they told me to do is take a pen, cross out the address, write ‘Does not reside’, and then put it back in the box.’
      • ‘If a section does not apply to you, cross it through with a line and the words ‘not applicable’.’
      • ‘A nameless person after my own heart had crossed out the extraneous apostrophe and written a comment berating the person for not knowing how to use the English language.’
      • ‘All the rest was crossed out because it was meaningless, self-serving guff - like this column.’
      • ‘Edith relaxed, sinking back into her chair, crossing out something she had written on her notepad and exhaling.’
      • ‘I wrote down something that I was just about to do (go pick up my ticket to Flipside), and then crossed it out.’
      • ‘So if the previous occupant had had his mail redirected and received this letter, what's to stop him from crossing out my name?’
      • ‘He gave a nod and picked up his pen, starting halfway down the page without crossing out what he'd written before.’
      • ‘I pause every so often to cross something out, or try to pick the best word to use.’
      • ‘But I never crossed his number out of my phone book.’
      • ‘Sheets that showed a translator writing lines, crossing them out, going back to what he crossed out… What a library would give for them today!’
      • ‘But then, he called Labaton back to clarify, saying that the problematic phrase was in an earlier draft, he had noticed it and crossed it out.’
      • ‘Jacob pondered on this for a moment, and then he responded: it's okay, if you don't know a word, just cross it out.’
      • ‘He said he had made a mistake and crossed that figure out and had written the correct amount of $590.17.’
      • ‘The last words were crossed out and new wording was substituted in manuscript.’
      • ‘On one line, all but three words were crossed out, replaced with a phrase.’
      • ‘Shann had written her name, then crossed it out, then written it again in tiny letters above it, then crossed that out.’
      • ‘There's a piece of contributory evidence here: Manningham started to write ‘Mid’, then crossed it out and wrote ‘Twelve Night’.’
      delete, strike out, strike through, ink out, score out, scratch out, block out, blank out, edit out, blue-pencil, cancel, eliminate, obliterate
      View synonyms
  • 4cross oneself(of a person) make the sign of the cross in front of one's chest as a sign of Christian reverence or to invoke divine protection.

    ‘Beatie crossed herself quickly at the mention of the dead’
    • ‘The queen closed her eyes with a prayer of thanksgiving, quickly crossing herself as she rose to her feet.’
    • ‘Strangers and friends cross themselves as the funeral begins.’
    • ‘Their names and histories were changed, often several times, and woe to the children who failed to remember which name was current, or to cross themselves, or to say recently learned Christian prayers.’
    • ‘But how many viewers noticed the winning jockey Graham Lee crossing himself?’
    • ‘I walked towards the hooded figure who had been crossing himself and stood in front of him, palms facing out to indicate that I offered no threat.’
    • ‘It allowed online visitors to kneel to pray, cross themselves and perform an arm-raising ‘hallelujah!’’
    • ‘As the preacher crossed himself, the church bell began to toll.’
    • ‘He used his dampened fingers to cross himself (forehead, chest, each shoulder) and then motioned for Loryn to do the same.’
    • ‘He kneels down, crosses himself, without being aware of it, and clasps his hands, prayer-like.’
    • ‘She addresses her prayers to Catholic saints, crosses herself, and has a collection of Catholic iconography.’
    • ‘Ted said thanks for the evening and Mary crossed herself and invoked some sort of biblical curse.’
    • ‘The priest, who was hovering nearby, crossed himself.’
    • ‘At 11 am, there are already about a hundred people inside, and still they are coming, crossing themselves as they enter, kissing a picture of Christ next to which is a bunch of bluebells.’
    • ‘She crushed the list against her chest and crossed herself.’
    • ‘I crossed myself, I greeted the priest, I kissed his hand, and my father understood.’
    • ‘Then the bishop came forth, crossed himself briefly, and bowed his head.’
    • ‘Many people integrate religious practice into their daily lives, crossing themselves while passing a church or entering to light a candle, pray, or meditate.’
    • ‘Quickly, he crossed himself, and knocked on the wooden bed frame as he sat back down on it.’
    • ‘The old Irish priest crossed himself and slunk back away from the computer.’
    • ‘She would pray when she returned home from his studio, and she would cross herself in front of La Madre de Dios in the evenings as she made her way back to him.’
  • 5Soccer
    Pass (the ball) across the field towards the centre when attacking.

    ‘he could not get to the line to cross the ball’
    no object ‘Powell crossed from the left’
    • ‘His ability to cross the ball and pass it over very long distances absolutely astonishes people.’
    • ‘Frank Foley went on a run from centre back, crossed the ball into the square for Thomas Doyle to equalise.’
    • ‘Germany attack down the left, the ball is crossed and Lukas Podolski tries a volley from inside the D of the Italy penalty area.’
    • ‘From the ensuing free-kick wide on the right, the ball is crossed in to the Italy penalty area.’
    • ‘Luis Garcia escapes down the right wing and crosses the ball into the Chelsea penalty area.’
  • 6Cause (an animal of one species, breed, or variety) to breed with one of another species, breed, or variety.

    ‘many animals of the breed were crossed with the closely related Guernsey’
    • ‘Males from Oregon-R and 2b were crossed with virgin females from each deficiency strain.’
    • ‘This was observed when two wallaby species, Macropus eugenii and Wallabia bicolor, were crossed.’
    • ‘The latest craze among dog fanciers: Poodles crossed with other breeds.’
    • ‘What do you get if you cross a carrier pigeon with a woodpecker?’
    • ‘It's actually a hybrid between two species, so it's rather like crossing a donkey with a horse: what you get is strong but it's completely sterile.’
    • ‘If we get to the point where we can make the offspring viable and fertile, then what I think we should do is attempt to cross lions with successively smaller felines until we create a male housecat with a mane.’
    • ‘First, the two breeds described previously were crossed, followed by 10 generations of random mating.’
    • ‘The Long-hair was crossed with the spaniel and an old German gun dog, the Stoberhund.’
    • ‘The novel is like science fiction crossed with an SAS adventure.’
    • ‘Merino ewes, grown for their wool, are crossed with a meat breed, such as a border Leicester ram, to produce so-called first-cross meat sheep.’
    • ‘During the 15th and 16 centuries, it was crossed with the sheep dog to provide strength, and later various hounds to obtain more speed.’
    • ‘The barb was taken to Spain by the Moors in the eighth century, and was crossed with local mares to produce the Andalusian.’
    • ‘Similar results have been obtained by crossing Pachon and Subterraneo cavefish.’
    • ‘The story of his life, at least as he tells it, reads as if Kafka had been crossed with Dostoevsky with a dollop of magical realism thrown in for good measure.’
    • ‘These felines are hybrids first bred from crossing a wild small leopard cat of Asia with a domestic cat.’
    • ‘The horses are usually Irish draught crossed with thoroughbred, a combination with a reliable temperament, and arrive at Hutton aged four.’
    • ‘She is now working with her third puppy Maple, a curly coated Retriever crossed with a Labrador.’
    • ‘Arabian stallions were crossed with a few English mares at the end of the 17th and start of the 18th centuries to produce the thoroughbred.’
    • ‘He's a Clydesdale cross, crossed with a standard breed.’
    • ‘The South American bee was crossed with the African bee, the idea being to create a more ‘resistant’ bee, a hardy all-weather insect.’
    1. 6.1 Cross-fertilize (a plant)
      ‘a hybrid tea was crossed with a polyantha rose’
      • ‘These native American species have since been crossed with V vinifera to form new varieties, and among themselves to produce the rootstocks used in modern viticulture.’
      • ‘This male was crossed with the female cultivar Hayward to produce the F 1 population.’
      • ‘They have been crossed with other Asian species to produce the plants now cultivated.’
      • ‘The frequency of embryo formation was similar to that obtained by crossing wheat with maize pollen.’
      • ‘Sixty-one triploid F 1 plants were crossed with diploid pollen donors for testcrosses.’
      • ‘Often the transgenic crop will be crossed with existing parents to produce an improved variety.’
      • ‘A total of 23 flowers were crossed, and 33 flowers were submitted to mixed pollinations.’
      • ‘A rice japonica variety, Nipponbare, was crossed with an indica variety, Kasalath.’
      • ‘Zao 18 was crossed with the SMV-susceptible cultivar Lee 68 to study the inheritance of resistance.’
      • ‘In the past, perennial species have been crossed with sunflower and most of the improvements in sunflower have been the result of crossing with Jerusalem artichoke.’
      • ‘These are the roses that were crossed with the tea rose of China to form the hybrid tea.’
      • ‘Many of today's hybrids have been crossed with Lilium regale.’
      hybridize, cross-breed, interbreed, cross-fertilize, cross-pollinate, intercross, mix, intermix, blend
      View synonyms
  • 7Oppose or stand in the way of (someone)

    ‘no one dared cross him’
    • ‘If someone crosses me I do like revenge, so watch out.’
    • ‘After suing anyone who dared to cross him, Douglas was finally imprisoned himself for libeling Winston Churchill.’
    • ‘Now that he had free range over his powers to do whatever he wanted with them, the men dared not cross him.’
    • ‘And he can make so much trouble if he doesn't get the elections he wants that it is not worthwhile crossing him.’
    • ‘So then, you've got PMS, and you're on the warpath, and you know that anyone who dares to cross you in any way, gets it!’
    • ‘You will experience a sense of liberation for the rest of your working life and be able to spit in the eye of just about anyone who crosses you - a great and abiding pleasure.’
    • ‘Too late they discover that Hale is an underworld crime lord, and that crossing him results in an inevitable slow and painful death.’
    • ‘She likes her own way and is unforgiving if slighted; one journalist who crossed her subsequently found many other powerful doors were slammed in his face.’
    • ‘Those who crossed him 12 months ago are not easily forgotten.’
    • ‘In his last years he was able to pick off those who had crossed him, reward those who had stood by him, and enjoy a quiet life at last.’
    • ‘He wants her to explain why everyone who crosses her gets injured.’
    • ‘No one dared to cross her - if Madeline didn't like you, it got pretty ugly.’
    • ‘The smile that said I dare you to cross me and see what happens.’
    • ‘There would be little quarter given to anyone who crossed him.’
    • ‘He has a daughter, I pity her husband if he crosses her.’
    • ‘Most importantly remind them of who's in control now and that they don't want to cross me.’
    • ‘Lately, he's taken to assailing university officials who dare to cross him on this explosive issue.’
    • ‘Brigid herself was the only one who dared to cross this woman.’
    • ‘Next time everyone will be against you, because you will have led them to expect that there will be no penalties for crossing you.’
    • ‘You might want to do it if your aim was not only to discredit the story but to discredit the source and discourage others from crossing you.’
    oppose, resist, defy, thwart, frustrate, foil, obstruct, impede, hinder, hamper, block, check, deny, contradict, argue with, quarrel with
    View synonyms

adjective

  • Annoyed.

    ‘he seemed to be very cross about something’
    • ‘Their father sounded really cross this time.’
    • ‘It does make her cross now when young women moan about their husbands being away for three months.’
    • ‘He added he was very cross and would stay mayor until the next council meeting on June 2 even if his brother returned wanting to take over office.’
    • ‘Now I think I was more cross with my mum than I was with my dad for not being there - I was definitely Daddy's little girl.’
    • ‘Yes, you might be able to tell, I am feeling quite cross with the world at large.’
    • ‘First, there is a new writ - and this time not from a cross landlord but from a large, impatient bank.’
    • ‘I am also cross that there may have been an assumption that private day nurseries are all just a licence to make money.’
    • ‘I went to them to see if they were interested but I just got a Dear John-type letter back which made me quite cross.’
    • ‘When he said, brusquely, that he was exceedingly cross, he was given nice things to smell and eat, with kindest expressions of condolence.’
    • ‘However, he can become cross or frustrated on occasion and he will sometimes resort to hitting himself or talking to himself.’
    • ‘It's not like he gets extra attention for doing it - after all, I'm not then able to play with him while I go into repair mode yet again, and I end up feeling very cross and resentful.’
    • ‘I have had the honour of knowing Roger for many years, and I can assure you that you have made a large number of people very cross through your careless choice of insulting words.’
    • ‘We promised to meet for coffee, and then suddenly, my station arrived and the train vomited me up onto the platform in a crowd of cross commuters.’
    • ‘Folks will be even crosser when they can't take a shower because your shortsighted bulldozing of environmental protections has dirtied most of the water and dried up the rest.’
    • ‘I remember being terribly cross with him, but he got away with a great deal because of his personal charm.’
    • ‘I go to the door in my pants and slippers, very cross indeed.’
    • ‘The driver couldn't get them open again so he was quite cross.’
    • ‘She said it with such conviction that her words, her cross tone, her stern expression - they are all burned in my memory.’
    • ‘‘She chatters away and gets very cross when she doesn't get her own way,’ laughs Katherine.’
    • ‘No one will get cross with you because you're too tired - they don't want you to faint halfway through a concert or anything.’
    angry, annoyed, irate, irritated, in a bad mood, peeved, vexed, upset, irked, piqued, out of humour, put out, displeased, galled, resentful
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • as cross as two sticks

    • Very annoyed or irritated.

      ‘she was as jumpy as a cat and as cross as two sticks’
      • ‘It is then that that he gets very frowny and shouty and looks as cross as two sticks, like Geoff, though not as sexy.’
      • ‘Here I am, tired, hot and as cross as two sticks (British expression - get it - like two sticks are crossed, you know to make an X - har har - never mind…)’
      • ‘And he came home next day dragging one foot after another, with a wizened face and as cross as two sticks.’
      • ‘‘It could do that and still freeze you to death,’ I says, as cross as two sticks.’
      • ‘I really get as cross as two sticks when I get to a city and find out they have forgotten that it should be possible for bikes to pass without great difficulties.’
      • ‘Jo is as cross as two sticks today.’
      • ‘Because of this I have been as cross as two sticks for the last couple of hours and my pain and anger has led me to eat cake when I am supposed to be detoxing.’
      angry, annoyed, irate, irritated, in a bad mood, peeved, vexed, upset, irked, piqued, out of humour, put out, displeased, galled, resentful
      View synonyms
  • at cross purposes

    • Misunderstanding or having different aims from one another.

      ‘we had been talking at cross purposes’
      • ‘I suspect the opposing sides may be at cross purposes at times, and that a solid working definition could clarify the debate.’
      • ‘And those two goals are at cross purposes with each other.’
      • ‘He was genuinely concerned that the Spurs affair might re-open the wounds that were patched up last season when he and the player were at cross purposes for a time.’
      • ‘All of these ‘villains’ act independently at times, and often at cross purposes.’
      • ‘Well, it looks like the sheriff and the DA are at cross purposes with one another.’
      • ‘At the same time, it needs to ensure that other policies - such as transport policy - are pulling in the same direction rather than working at cross purposes.’
      • ‘The script is a series of vignettes, short dialogues in which people often talk at cross purposes to each other, sometimes to comic effect, sometimes not.’
      • ‘I think we're talking at cross purposes here pal, that's the one I bought a few weeks ago, hence the fifteen quid well spent.’
      • ‘In the past such people were disorganized and often at cross purposes, in both political parties and no political party.’
      • ‘Well, i don't think this's going anywhere, but it's a shame, as I still get the impression we're talking at cross purposes.’
      conflicting, in conflict, contrasting, incompatible, irreconcilable, antithetical, contradictory, clashing, contrary, different, differing, divergent, dissimilar, disagreeing, in disagreement, at odds, at cross purposes, at loggerheads, opposed, opposing, opposite, in opposition, poles apart, polar, at outs
      View synonyms
  • cross one's fingers

    • Put one finger across another as a sign of hoping for good luck.

      ‘we will be keeping our fingers crossed that a quick thaw is on its way’
      • ‘Jamilla kept her fingers crossed and it wasn't long before her innermost prayers were answered: she got an opening to play overseas.’
      • ‘I'm crossing my fingers for the best, and holding my breath until March 26.’
      • ‘She clambered into the boat and, crossing her fingers that this crazy experiment would work, began to row.’
      • ‘However all concerned are keeping their fingers crossed in the hope that the work will be completed.’
      • ‘Or they may decide to keep their fingers crossed until their renewal date and hope that no major disaster strikes.’
      • ‘This year, we'll just have to keep our fingers crossed and hope all will be well.’
      • ‘So let's keep our fingers crossed and hope that it's a little bit light enough in the morning to burn those clouds off.’
      • ‘We kept our fingers crossed that the rain would continue, and when it did we planted broad beans, broccoli, and radishes which are now thriving.’
      • ‘We are keeping our fingers crossed and hoping that the blood tests will prove negative.’
      • ‘If nothing unlucky happens to you today, cross your fingers and touch wood because it's only six months until the next Friday the 13th.’
      hope for the best
      View synonyms
  • cross the floor

    • Join the opposing side in Parliament.

      • ‘Since then four more Labour councillors have crossed the floor of council chambers around the country to join Respect.’
      • ‘The cardinal crime in the Labor calendar has traditionally been ‘to rat’; that is, to cross the floor and join the opposition.’
      • ‘Indeed, within a few weeks Churchill crossed the floor of the House from the Conservative benches to join the Liberals.’
      • ‘He was once a Labour councillor in the city, but crossed the floor to join the Tories.’
      • ‘Thus, it was not a new development, when, after the 2001 elections, a handful of members of Parliament crossed the floor from opposition parties to the ruling MMD party.’
      • ‘Having crossed the floor to become a Liberal in 1904 (as a free trader opposed to tariff reform), Churchill became president of the Board of Trade four years later.’
      • ‘Basically, the Tory MP approached the Liberals because he and his wife, Nina (also an MP) wanted to cross the floor and join the government.’
      • ‘In 1900 he entered the House of Commons as a Conservative but crossed the floor within four years to join the Liberals on the issue of free trade.’
      • ‘He was succeeded by Shaun Woodward, a director of party public relations, who later crossed the floor of the House of Commons to join the Labour Party.’
      • ‘If just eight Government members were willing to cross the floor, the will of this parliament, the will of our democracy would prevail.’
  • cross my heart (and hope to die)

    • Used to emphasize the truthfulness and sincerity of what one is saying.

      ‘I'm deadly serious—cross my heart and hope to die’
      • ‘‘I understand entirely, cross my heart hope to die,’ he said seriously.’
      • ‘Well this time I mean it, honest, cross my heart hope to die.’
      • ‘I promise that I won't laugh - cross my heart, hope to die.’
      • ‘Just tell me the truth and I cross my heart, I won't tell anyone else in the world.’
      • ‘‘I can tell you with the utmost truth, cross my heart and hope to die and all the rest of it, one Sunday night we heard Tokyo Rose and her propaganda broadcast,’ says Don, now aged 75.’
      • ‘I had to cross my heart and swear to die and even then promise to do to her no harm before I could convince him.’
      • ‘I promise myself, cross my heart hope to die, that I will never again get into a car when Grant is behind the wheel.’
      • ‘Our cows, cross my heart, have the choice of their own vets while local horses have no need to wait for elective surgery.’
      • ‘Honey I swear… I will not take any assignments… I know our last vacations were cut short… But this will be different… I promise cross my heart…’
      • ‘Next time, cross my heart, I promise to share the recipe for my Super-Duper Mint Fudge Walnut Divinity!’
  • cross one's legs

    • Place one leg over the other while seated.

      ‘I crossed my legs and leaned back in my chair’
      • ‘I crossed my legs through my whole wait.’
      • ‘She fled back to the stoop, seating herself there, crossing her legs.’
      • ‘I have often said, when she comes on television, I involuntarily cross my legs.’
      • ‘She was from Texas, she said, crossing her legs.’
      • ‘She leans back in her chair, lazily crossing her legs.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, those who can't cross their legs shouldn't get too worried.’
      • ‘Setting the tray down in the middle of the rug, David sat, crossing his legs Indian-style.’
      • ‘Crossing her legs at her ankles, she lifted her gaze to her older sister expectantly.’
      • ‘She sat down on my unmade bed and crossed her legs.’
      • ‘She sat down in a chair opposite his own and crossed her legs.’
  • cross one's mind

    • (of a thought) occur to one, especially transiently.

      ‘it had not crossed Flora's mind that they might need payment’
      • ‘He is unflinching mentally: ‘I don't think about what's happened to me in the past and it never crosses my mind when I'm playing I might get hurt.‘’
      • ‘Let's face it, if these things were easy to do, we would do them when the idea first crossed our mind.’
      • ‘When I ordered the poster the potential for this problem crossed my mind but I dismissed it out of hand.’
      • ‘That was the last thought that crossed his mind before his mind shut down and he drifted into blissful sleep.’
      • ‘It's impossible to say how I was feeling at the time. I thought her life was in danger, and the thought that she was going to die crossed my mind.’
      • ‘But despite all of this, and despite the 16-page pullout supplement, Canada never even crosses my mind as a holiday destination.’
      • ‘The experience was friendly, informative, relaxed and effective in so far as I have not smoked since then and the thought of having one rarely crosses my mind.’
      • ‘Has it ever crossed your mind that indoor air quality could have an impact on your health?’
      • ‘Getting her own flat only fleetingly crosses her mind.’
      • ‘It crosses my mind how fast we've adapted to our surroundings.’
      occur to one, come to one, come to mind, spring to mind, enter one's head, enter one's mind, strike one, hit one, dawn on one, come into one's consciousness, suggest itself
      View synonyms
  • cross someone's palm with silver

    • humorous Pay someone for a favour or service, especially before having one's fortune told.

      ‘we strongly suspect her palm had been crossed with silver in return for her silence’
      • ‘I am the gipsy Zara, and if you cross my palm with silver, I will venture to advise you on your adventures.’
      • ‘Please now cross my palm with silver, or I'll set that woman on you.’
      • ‘Allegedly, a great deal more money has since crossed the palms of those in local government, and all of the charges against the owner seem to have been forgotten.’
      • ‘Some people don't even say thank you, but they do cross my palm with silver, so I can't complain.’
      • ‘‘I will take it,’ she said, fishing in her purse and crossing his palm with silver: ‘Here is the cost of your time.’’
      • ‘There are things he could do to make his company more efficient, but he won't do them until someone crosses his palm with silver.’
      • ‘Meanwhile the rest of the world will move ahead, while our country is stuck in the mud because no one can write 1 + 1 = 2 without crossing somebody's palm with silver.’
      • ‘I fall for it every time; who wouldn't - the chance for follicular perfection by just crossing someone's palm with silver.’
      • ‘You may get a barman with a seething hatred for you in his steely glare, tempered only lightly if you choose to cross his palm with extra silver.’
      • ‘Yet, in allowing him to cross his palm with silver - £160,000 pieces to be exact - McDonald became the architect of his own downfall.’
  • cross someone's path

    • Be met or encountered.

      ‘she got to know people who wouldn't ordinarily cross her path’
      ‘their paths crossed years later at Manchester University’
      • ‘It doesn't matter if you're shy or that you are a homebody, God will see to it that Mr. Right crosses your path in due time, says Rev.’
      • ‘Jessica is never afraid to say ‘Hi’ to whomever crosses her path as she makes her way through her first year of middle school.’
      • ‘She told him: ‘I take the view that you are more than capable, and extremely likely, to resort to violence against anyone who crosses your path.’’
      • ‘Glass is interrupted by the antics of extended family and friends who keep crossing his path in need of help.’
      • ‘During our normal daily lives in our own countries, the variety of interesting characters we meet in Pattaya probably would not cross our path.’
      • ‘I don't think I recall any Malaysian fiction ever crossing my path, so this is a first.’
      • ‘Delightful memories that at least we can carry with us as some kind of consolation for knowing that we won't be crossing his path again on this side of Paradise.’
      • ‘From now on, I do so solemnly swear that whoever crosses my path will meet a very painful end.’
      • ‘I'm of a fearsome mind to throw my arms around every living librarian who crosses my path, on behalf of the souls they never knew they saved.’
      • ‘I'm still poking around, seeing how things work, how people interact with each other, and thinking critically about art, design, science, religion, and pretty much anything else that crosses my path.’
  • cross swords

    • Have an argument or dispute.

      ‘the two leaders crossed swords’
      • ‘Leading names in politics and business will cross swords at the Manchester Evening News's great debate on a mini-parliament for the north west.’
      • ‘I don't think I'd fancy crossing swords with him in open debate.’
      • ‘Here he pauses, drops his diplomatic shield and oozes contempt for those he crossed swords with during his lengthy TV career.’
      • ‘The two main parties crossed swords over the Midland Regional Authority's Draft Regional Planning Guidelines at Monday's County Council meeting.’
      • ‘The two counties are meeting for the second time in four weeks, and this will be the tenth meeting of the sides since they first crossed swords almost 50 years ago.’
      • ‘And I'm sure our leaders have exaggerated the extent to which they enjoyed crossing swords with him.’
      • ‘The lawyer, who has crossed swords and won a court battle initially halting Powell's attempts to relax media ownership limits, also chided the chairman for not seeking input on other issues.’
      • ‘Though a champion of education, the moderate Republican repeatedly crossed swords with the teachers' union while mayor.’
      • ‘She regularly joins in discussions on Britain's economic future, and recently crossed swords with Germaine Greer in a debate on the future of her adoptive city.’
      • ‘An intense and sometimes fiery debate resulted in councillors crossing swords on a number of occasions.’
      quarrel, disagree, have a dispute, wrangle, bicker, be at odds, be at loggerheads, lock horns, lock antlers
      View synonyms
  • crossed line

    • A telephone connection that has been wrongly made with the result that another call or calls can be heard.

      ‘the system will be totally secure from crossed lines and tapping’
      • ‘If there was a fight on the street, or an argument in the next room, or a crossed line, or someone punishing a child, he was transfixed, and he listened.’
      • ‘An ‘intermittent crossed line fault on the company's UK network’ is being blamed for some callers being able to listen in to other people's calls.’
      • ‘It was bad enough that his phone kept getting crossed lines, without the added hassle of all the low-lifes he was being forced to talk to.’
      • ‘Yesterday, over a crossed line, she heard a murder being planned.’
      • ‘Sorry, there must be a crossed line, I can't hear what you're saying!’
      • ‘It's a crossed line, the other party won't get off the phone and it takes the intervention of the operator to get through to your lover.’
      • ‘I'm just about to put the phone down, when I hear muffled voices in the background like a crossed line.’
      • ‘For the past 48 hours I keep keep getting completely crossed lines and ending up with the person I'm calling talking to someone else and me connected to someone else too.’
  • get one's wires (or lines) crossed

    • 1Become wrongly connected by telephone.

      • ‘Mobile phone punters in London have been having the weirdest conversations after the phone company admitted that it has been getting its wires crossed.’
      1. 1.1Have a misunderstanding.
        ‘somewhere along the line someone had got their wires crossed, that much was clear’
        • ‘Okay, so having fun with role reversal is one thing, but Geoff and I have seriously got our lines crossed these past couple days.’
        • ‘Also, let me point out that you've got your wires crossed.’
        • ‘I would strongly advise her to go back and read her history books once again as she has got her wires crossed from a historical point of view.’
        • ‘I think W K Quick may have got his wires crossed regarding certain drivers being exempt from paying vehicle excise duty.’
        • ‘Unfortunately nurse got her wires crossed again, she gave the lady 12 tablets at two.’
        • ‘I think your reporter and myself got our wires crossed when I was talking to him about housing issues in general.’
        • ‘This was an organised trip with written permission, and someone has got their wires crossed, and the whole thing has snowballed.’
        • ‘And it is obvious that even the Reuter correspondent has got his wires crossed on the above subject.’
        • ‘I think it's you who've got your wires crossed.’
        • ‘The perception that commanding officers got their wires crossed has been reinforced by reports and books on the conflict.’
  • have a/one's cross to bear

    • Have a difficult problem or responsibility one has to deal with.

      ‘as a smoker, I can tell you it's a horrible habit, but that's my cross to bear’
      • ‘We all know that Dudley has his own cross to bear.’
      • ‘Oh, well, we all have our crosses to bear.’
      • ‘I have my cross to bear and she has hers.’
      • ‘Svennis has his cross to bear, and he's unlikely to be entirely loved even if he wins in Germany.’
      • ‘When it comes to natural disasters, every region has its crosses to bear.’
      • ‘We all have our cross to bear in life.’
      • ‘So you have your cross to bear.’
      • ‘We all have our cross to bear, I suppose.’
      • ‘Sometimes I think I became a lesbian so I'd have a cross to bear.’
      • ‘Every team has a cross to bear, and if that's the Yankees cross, so be it.’

Origin

Late Old English (in the sense ‘monument in the form of a cross’): from Old Norse kross, from Old Irish cros, from Latin crux.

Pronunciation

cross

/krɒs/