Definition of crop in English:



  • 1A cultivated plant that is grown on a large scale commercially, especially a cereal, fruit, or vegetable.

    ‘the main crops were oats and barley’
    • ‘These four crops accounted for 52 percent of U.S. acres planted to crops excluding fruits and vegetables in 2001.’
    • ‘As rent and repayment for seeds or other supplies, the farmer pays the landowner with a portion of the crops grown on the land.’
    • ‘It is these seeds that will ultimately be crushed to produce the vegetable oil that the crop is grown for.’
    • ‘Amongst the fruit crops grown in the country, banana ranks first in production and third in area under cultivation.’
    • ‘Rice, wheat, maize, and millet are the main crops grown in the country.’
    • ‘Ploughing was his forte and he loved to sow and plant the crops, watch them grow and mature, and harvest them at the back-end.’
    • ‘Farmers can use some parts of their land to grow crops and use other parts as recreation sites.’
    • ‘Lastly rural folks need practical training in agriculture to enable them to plant vegetables and crops.’
    • ‘In late November, the same producer might then plant a flax crop to grow through March.’
    • ‘The crop is grown commercially only in those regions where the plants are forced into a rest period by cold or drought.’
    • ‘In addition to rice, they also grow some other edible crops and plant vegetables and fruit around the edge of their plots.’
    • ‘Allowing GM crops to be grown commercially in Scotland could lead to another outbreak of direct action by environmentalists.’
    • ‘The whole community participates in clearing land to grow crops.’
    • ‘The women baked bread and danced and listened to music, and the guys worked out on the fields, growing vegetables and other crops.’
    • ‘The animals were fed only on pasture, which was often the residue of various vegetable crops grown in the province of Naples.’
    • ‘He now has no land to grow crops or raise cattle.’
    • ‘Right now, about three million hectares of Canadian farmland are growing crops of plants that have been genetically modified by biotechnology.’
    • ‘Fruits and vegetables are expensive crops to grow.’
    • ‘A wide range of vegetable crops are grown, all of which are produced without any of the modern-day chemicals which dominate the lives of today's farmer.’
    • ‘Plant breeders changed the crop into one grown primarily for the oil and protein in its seed.’
    1. 1.1An amount of produce harvested at one time.
      ‘a heavy crop of fruit’
      • ‘The rainy season was so heavy following the drought that it destroyed the second crop and the harvest was so poor that one man in the village hung himself.’
      • ‘An answer may take 3-7 months, long after the crops have been harvested and contamination has happened.’
      • ‘Potato farmer Simon Bradley took matters into his own hands when he harvested his biggest crop, but was unable to sell it all through his York outlets.’
      • ‘Farmers who came back to harvest the crops on their small-holdings often put their lives at risk to do so.’
      • ‘They have to harvest the crop with almost military precision and at a pace almost as hectic as war.’
      • ‘Three weeks from now I will be harvesting my crops.’
      • ‘The growers are still harvesting their crop, months later than usual.’
      • ‘It gives the northern farmer more night light to harvest crops.’
      • ‘All of us lived together, ploughed together, and harvested the crops together.’
      • ‘In some areas farmers have not harvested their crops, as there is no market for them.’
      • ‘When the crop was harvested, pesticide residues were found to exceed the legal limit.’
      • ‘He was harvesting the crops, and had gathered in his arms a large bundle of corn.’
      • ‘Their action comes in the middle of the cherry picking season and has forced growers into the orchards to harvest their own crop.’
      • ‘The season of 1874-75 was excellent, with two crops harvested and stored.’
      • ‘Both men and women work in the fields and harvest the crops.’
      • ‘Gusty winds continued to dry soils and accelerate the wheat crop toward an early harvest.’
      • ‘They do use modern farming technology, however, harvesting their crops with huge combines.’
      • ‘Farmers ask for government help because they cannot harvest their crops after a drought.’
      • ‘When all the crops had been harvested and stored away, and before the men left for the fall hunt, the Harvest Festival was held.’
      • ‘While the GM seeds cost more than regular ones, she saves money by not having to use so much pesticide and has harvested bigger crops.’
      harvest, year's growth, yield, produce, vintage, gathering, reaping, gleaning, garnering
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    2. 1.2An abundance of something, especially a person's hair.
      ‘he had a thick crop of wiry hair’
      • ‘She had a crop of shining blonde curls, a round face and large grey eyes.’
      • ‘He had a wild crop of white hair and scary gray eyes that sended chills up Mel's spine.’
      • ‘Even his neat crop of raven hair was beginning to grey at the edges.’
      • ‘This beautiful blue-eyed wonder also has a crop of thick luxurious brown hair.’
      • ‘Something about him she didn't like, his jaunty airs, the straw cowboy hat placed raggedly atop his musty brown crop of hair.’
      • ‘Now, his dark eyes scanning his surroundings, he spots a woman with an unmistakable crop of curling red hair.’
      • ‘The electric blue eyes beam between a dark crop of lush hair and a rich beard.’
      • ‘The whiteness of his robust crop of hair could, with a slight stretch, be thought premature.’
      • ‘And just to rub salt into the wound, I had a luxuriant crop of hair on the top of my head in those wasted years (there is a photo to prove it).’
      • ‘His face beamed beneath a crop of unbrushed hair.’
      • ‘He's tall, with a healthy crop of white hair.’
      • ‘He had a weird crop of facial hair, was ugly as all hell, and he talked in a way that bothered me.’
      • ‘Leaning heavily against the side of the desk, he runs a hand through his curly crop of brown hair.’
      • ‘He went under the razor and sacrificed his crop of red hair to raise money for his son's special school.’
      • ‘Damon sat across from them in a brown leather chair, his green eyes nearly hidden by his thick crop of brown-black hair.’
      • ‘It suited her boyish crop of brunette hair and wild, pale blue eyes.’
      • ‘The crop of ginger hair may be missing, but otherwise the similarities in size and style are striking.’
      • ‘A heavier-than-average baby at nine pounds something with a messy crop of soot-black hair, squinty eyes and dimples in all the right places.’
      • ‘He stood straight, his head at a perfect angle revealing a pointed chin sporting a delicate crop of black hair finely trimmed at the end.’
      • ‘Mr. Wright had a thick crop of medium brown hair that crowned a boyish, blue eyed face.’
      mass, mane, mop, thatch, head, bush, cloud, frizz, fuzz, foam, curls, tangle, chaos, cascade, quiff, halo
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    3. 1.3The total number of young farm animals born in a particular year on one farm.
      ‘failure to observe sound practice leads to a lamb crop at weaning of around 50–60 per cent’
      • ‘Jennifer might talk about her award-winning goats or the new crop of kids born days before.’
  • 2A group or amount of related people or things appearing or occurring at one time.

    ‘the current crop of politicians’
    • ‘It's no small task, but the current crop of candidates appears to be up to the task.’
    • ‘Scotland currently have an abundant crop of up-and-coming back-rowers.’
    • ‘Well, what do you think about the current crop of sitcoms?’
    • ‘This easily is one of the best looking games that will appear on the current crop of console hardware.’
    • ‘There is plenty to keep the avid garden visitor busy tomorrow with a plentiful crop of gardens open in the area.’
    • ‘His recent European tour produced a bumper crop of such stories.’
    • ‘Only 21, he is already the holder of four singles titles, and is widely recognised as the most naturally gifted of the current crop of youngsters in the professional game.’
    • ‘The new crop of boats appears to be designed and built by committee, the accountants and people with no practical experience.’
    • ‘The current crop of UK writers are turning out some amazing material.’
    • ‘Every season, first books appear by a crop of new writers worthy of ink and paper.’
    • ‘Seasoned councillors welcomed a crop of hopeful new politicians into their ranks.’
    • ‘The challenge now, is to give the current crop of recruits more time to build a cohesive affront.’
    • ‘The album is rather different from the current crop of pop music.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, come April, we'll have a new crop of stars to profile and watch.’
    • ‘The president's advisors will be worried by the latest crop of polls which appear to indicate a groundswell of dissatisfaction with their man.’
    • ‘As the crop of digitally animated films becomes more abundant, audiences are likely to demand increasingly more from such movies.’
    • ‘It sends a disturbing message that the new crop of aspiring music journalists do not know about music genres and musical history that emerged before 1990.’
    • ‘Along came a new crop of country singers.’
    • ‘The current crop of middle to late 20th Century ‘Period Dramas’, all re-evaluate the past through a filter of modern-day attitudes.’
    • ‘But the current crop of tests appears to be aimed only at evaluating minimum competence.’
    batch, lot, assortment, selection, collection, supply, intake
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  • 3A hairstyle in which the hair is cut very short.

    ‘she has her hair cut in a short crop’
    • ‘Her back was turned to me, so I could only see her short crop of black hair and the red mantle she wore.’
    • ‘There are plenty of short haircuts on display but they are more about disguising thinning crops than making a political statement.’
    • ‘She mimics the popular asymmetrical relaxed crop with fine layered braids.’
    • ‘He arched his back, then ran his short, stubby fingers through the brush of short, white crop of hair on his head.’
    • ‘Buns, twists, chignons and hair knots generally work for most hair types, textures and lengths except super short chops and crops.’
    • ‘An easy shape and vibrant color give this saucy crop its appeal.’
    • ‘His hair has just been recently chopped from his younger out-of-date curtains style into a short ruffled and very sexy crop.’
    • ‘While I was eating, my mom fussed with my short crop of red hair.’
    • ‘Unconsciously she stretched a hand upwards to touch the short, pale blonde crop.’
    • ‘Emily Rose, who had a short crop of blond hair, had hers spiked up more than usual, giving her a uniquely almost warrior-esque look.’
    • ‘Our favorite crops are always about a great shape, color and, of course, terrific styling aids.’
    • ‘With their similar crops of thick black hair, large soulful eyes, and charming grins, they're difficult to tell apart.’
    • ‘I flicked at my hair, a savage spiky crop with a bleached fringe, lightly gelled, glanced at my watch, frowned and headed for the door.’
    • ‘A short crop of blond hair accented the flawless skin, the blue eyes.’
    • ‘She had her hair cut into a short crop and always wore pants or shorts.’
    • ‘His hair is longer than the close crop he wears during the season.’
    • ‘His close crop is obviously low maintenance.’
    • ‘We all had the same hairdo too, called a crop, and I'm pretty sure it came complete with a comb for your back pocket.’
    • ‘In particular, I tell her, the short, blonde crop she sported was not well received.’
  • 4

    • ‘Flipping back one of the exercise mats, he revealed a selection of whips, canes and crops.’
    whip, lash, scourge, cat, thong, switch, birch, cane, stick
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  • 5A pouch in a bird's gullet where food is stored or prepared for digestion.

    ‘the parent waxbill partially digests food in its crop’
    • ‘Chickadees don't have a crop in their throats to store food that is slowly digested while sleeping.’
    • ‘Grain is stored in their crops and ground by the grit in their gizzard.’
    craw, maw, gullet, throat
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    1. 5.1An organ resembling a pouch in an insect or earthworm.
      • ‘A comparison of specific organs revealed a huge difference in ethyl oleate found in the crop, an organ used for nectar storage.’
      • ‘Serotonin is a biogenic amine that modulates smooth muscle contractions of the crop and gizzard of the earthworm, Lumbricus terrestris.’
  • 6The entire tanned hide of an animal.

    hide, pelt, fleece
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  • 1[with object] Cut (something, especially a person's hair) very short.

    ‘cropped blonde hair’
    • ‘She was a recent divorcee with short, cropped brown hair and doe eyes.’
    • ‘He combed his fingers through his short cropped hair and opened the door.’
    • ‘He had short cropped blonde hair and friendly ice blue eyes.’
    • ‘The woman wore a white tank top and shorts, and had cropped red hair.’
    • ‘She pushed back her hood and short cropped brown hair was revealed.’
    • ‘Young men have very short, closely cropped hair and also dress stylishly.’
    • ‘She shook her head, short cropped red hair dancing delicately in the movement.’
    • ‘His hair was cropped short and his skin was dark.’
    • ‘White hair was cropped short and he had nice cheekbones.’
    • ‘His once red hair was cropped short and his green eyes sparked with intensity.’
    • ‘Her blonde hair was cropped even shorter and her aquamarine eyes were not red rimmed like Julia's.’
    • ‘She had incredibly short, cropped dark hair and little curls that framed her thin face.’
    • ‘He looked to be in his thirties, with short cropped dark hair and bright hazel eyes.’
    • ‘Blonde hair was cropped close to his head, and looked rather disheveled.’
    • ‘This woman's hair was cropped short in haphazard spikes on the top, a braid hanging over her shoulder.’
    • ‘The man is described as around 5ft 10 in, in his early 20s, with very short, possibly cropped mousy hair.’
    • ‘She is reminded bitterly of how she cropped her long hair short.’
    • ‘There stood a tall man of about 25 with blonde cropped hair, and electric blue eyes under silver framed glasses.’
    • ‘Her blond hair was cropped short and framed her face.’
    • ‘His hair was cropped short and made his head look square.’
    cut short, cut, clip, trim, snip, shear, shave
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    1. 1.1(of an animal) bite off and eat the tops of (plants)
      ‘the horse was gratefully cropping the grass’
      • ‘On the hillside below them half a dozen sheep cropped the sunlit grass and kept a wary eye.’
      • ‘The abandonment of sheep farming has led to degradation in the character of the landscape as grass that was previously cropped is allowed to grow rank and wild.’
      • ‘He lifted his head and shook his mane in recognition and went back to contentedly cropping the grass.’
      • ‘He shook his white mane out and set about cropping some grass from the edge of the road.’
      • ‘Apart from the structure of the pelvis they characteristically had an additional bone at the front of the upper jaw, the predentary, which bore no teeth but acted like a beak for cropping vegetation.’
      • ‘Sheep and cattle do not crop a pasture in neat rows.’
      • ‘The pony merely rolled an eye to look up at him and continued cropping the grass lazily.’
      • ‘A sound of underwater cows cropping lily-pads came from the western margin of the pond, where the rapids were.’
      • ‘He had finished drinking, and was now cropping the grass a small distance away.’
      • ‘Deer cropped the springy turf beside us, so close we could hear every snuffle and chomp.’
      • ‘But when I tasted them, they were extremely salty, and the leaves had obviously been cropped by a rodent.’
      • ‘Some distance behind him a black horse cropped the grass.’
      • ‘It was just a prefabricated hut, with a couple of sheep cropping the grass outside.’
      • ‘They are characterized by a short snout and the loss of almost all their teeth, which were replaced by a turtle-like beak used for cropping vegetation.’
      • ‘Several Hampshire rams had been seen sleeping and cropping the grass in the yard adjoining a well-known York church.’
      • ‘She looked depressed and forgotten with her head to the ground, carefully cropping each blade of grass to the same height.’
      graze on, browse on, feed on, eat
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    2. 1.2Cut the edges of (a photograph) in order to produce a better picture or to fit a given space.
      ‘you can always crop the picture afterwards’
      • ‘She had already cropped this photograph to fit the rectangular print into the square format of the book.’
      • ‘She took photos from magazines, enlarged them, cropped them, spliced them, and combined them with text.’
      • ‘Alternatively, you can use freely available software on your PC to zoom and crop your images at home.’
      • ‘Although you can crop a picture later using your computer, you'll get sharper results by cropping using the camera.’
      • ‘The photographs are cropped so low that the steps leading down to the river are divorced from the main path.’
      • ‘Have I cropped the photo to eliminate extraneous detail and focus the viewer's attention?’
      • ‘The photo is cropped closely so that the reader is not aware that he's looking at a picture of a male horse rather than a mare.’
      • ‘The SMH crops the picture so that this potentially distressing part of the image is not visible to their readers.’
      • ‘We can size, colour-correct and crop your images to fit space if required.’
      • ‘The picture had been cropped to fit the face of a figure on the other player's shoulders.’
      • ‘You can quickly and easily crop your picture, correct brightness and contrast levels, even get rid of red-eye.’
      • ‘In the past, photographs were cropped to alter their meaning, mis-captioned and retouched.’
      • ‘They cropped the photograph of her friend.’
      • ‘Just hop on over to the Cropping Corner to learn how to crop photographs in new and unusual shapes.’
      • ‘I have cropped the original photo to show only five of the sphere images.’
      • ‘We see that the photos are actually cropped from larger shots.’
      • ‘Add to that the good hour and a half it took me to scan and crop the photos.’
      • ‘Other than cropping the photo and adjusting the levels and size, it has not been altered in any way.’
      • ‘I cropped the photo to the size of the original.’
      • ‘This way you can scale or crop the photo to fit the template.’
  • 2[with object] Harvest (plants or their produce) from a particular area.

    ‘hay would have been cropped several times through the summer’
    • ‘Set-aside payments will not help the farmer much because the subsidy is the same as if it had been cropped, but without the actual crop to sell.’
    • ‘Nobody is going to start the laborious process of cropping a plant if it is freely available in the environment.’
    • ‘First earlies are planted between the end of March and early April and take about 100 days before cropping.’
    • ‘In Israel, vine cacti are cropped despite the absence of natural pollinators.’
    • ‘It should be farmers' priority in Zambia to cut cotton stalks immediately after cropping if they are to avoid serious infestation of pests and diseases and achieve better yields.’
    • ‘Research has shown that both corn and soybeans produce higher yields when rotated rather than when cropped continuously.’
    harvest, reap, mow
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    1. 2.1Sow or plant (land) with plants that will produce food or fodder, especially on a large commercial scale.
      ‘the southern areas are cropped in cotton’
      ‘intensively cropped areas’
      • ‘Tillage farmers are facing crucial decisions on the amount of land they should crop under the new tillage policy.’
      • ‘The lower value of these has necessitated more frequent cropping and the use of more farmland area, intensifying the effects upon the catchment.’
      • ‘In the case of crops at least 50% of the eligible area must be cropped each year - i.e. sown with a crop other than grass.’
      • ‘The rest has been left idle, used as grazing land, or intermittently cropped.’
      • ‘A mere 10 per cent of the land has been cropped.’
      • ‘Virtually all land is double cropped, and many farmers cultivate three or four crops a year.’
      • ‘Fields with heavy infestations could be cropped for a few years so tillage and herbicides could reduce infestations.’
      • ‘Trials with rhodes, panic and seteria grasses in particular have proven successful in providing year round pastures in areas unsuitable for cropping.’
      • ‘Southeastern soils have been intensively cropped and are prone to drought and erosion.’
      • ‘At this time the cropped areas expanded significantly, as did the number of people engaged in that activity.’
      • ‘Farmers should have 30 per cent of their cropped area planted with legumes each season.’
      • ‘Rising temperatures will make arable land available that's currently too cold for cropping.’
      • ‘The Court has already imposed an interim injunction against the cleared area being cropped.’
      • ‘It grows in the same fertile soils that are good for farming, and it continues to be cleared for cropping as well as grazed, with hardly any in protected reserves.’
      • ‘Cropland must meet cropping history criteria and be physically and legally capable of being cropped in a normal manner.’
      • ‘And this over here, we bought this farm not long ago, and that hadn't been cropped that area down there, for 30 years.’
      • ‘Land must be cropped in order to pay the bills.’
      • ‘He crops 350 hectares of some of his best and worst soils with the pasture to produce between 500 kilograms and 750 kilogram of seed a hectare.’
    2. 2.2[no object](of land or a plant) yield a harvest of plants or produce.
      ‘the parsley will need protection to continue cropping through the winter’
      • ‘If planted in April 1990, they will crop in the summer of 1990, 1991 and 1992.’
      • ‘Raspberries continue to crop heavily too, but there aren't that many left now.’
      • ‘I always like to sow some broad beans in autumn to have something growing in the veg plot over winter, and they usually crop earlier than the spring-sown ones.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • crop out

    • (of rock) appear or be exposed at the surface of the earth.

      ‘high hills are found where the igneous rocks of eastern South Uist crop out’
      • ‘The nature of the Lower Palaeozoic rocks which crop out in the peninsula therefore hold important evidence for the Caledonian evolution of the area.’
      • ‘Basement rocks crop out along the entire La Hague peninsula in a number of fault-bounded blocks and as thin layers separated by intrusive Cadomian igneous bodies.’
      • ‘Mafic volcanic rocks on this trend crop out on eastern King Island, with exposures including dykes, pillow lavas, volcaniclastic rocks and dolomites.’
      • ‘The Mesozoic rocks crop out only in the Zhaigang and Zhainan areas in the southeastern part of the county.’
      • ‘At the base of the erosional hollow, an inlier of Jurassic rocks crops out below the late Cimmerian unconformity.’
      • ‘Volcanic rocks that crop out in the mine area are part of the Portage Lake Volcanics and consist of thin lava flows and interbedded sedimentary rocks.’
      • ‘The Hammamat Group is a sequence of immature, clastic sedimentary rocks that crop out sporadically throughout the central and northern segments of the Eastern Desert of Egypt.’
      • ‘The Dzhabyk batholith crops out along the entire surface trace of the profile.’
      • ‘The hinges of folded debris layers crop out on the glacier surface as flow-parallel medial moraines, with axes dipping gently up-glacier.’
      • ‘In contrast, depositional landscapes predominate in southern Alberta and Saskatchewan, where soft sedimentary rocks crop out near the southern limit of the ice sheet.’
  • crop up

    • Appear, occur, or come to one's notice unexpectedly.

      ‘some urgent business had cropped up’
      • ‘Something crops up that just absolutely has to be sorted out face to face.’
      • ‘Unless something unexpected crops up this year, this test looks like something a lot of us should try next year.’
      • ‘The book is also repetitive: the same old laundry list of sour complaints about the man, his works, and his cronies, crops up again and again.’
      • ‘All the same, Lola crops up frequently in our discussions like a slightly eccentric but beloved foreign cousin.’
      • ‘The gender issue crops up in just about every walk of life.’
      • ‘These predictions crop up every decade or so and they are always wrong.’
      • ‘Bruce Springsteen was a name that often cropped up as a reference point.’
      • ‘When talking to locals and expats, this topic often crops up.’
      • ‘‘I'm not one of these people who is trying to be modern’ is a phrase that crops up repeatedly.’
      • ‘I've noticed little mistakes and typos cropping up here and there.’
      • ‘One theme that crops up week after week are those who hit their 5 or 6 month anniversary.’
      • ‘It's a problem we've noticed before and it seems to crop up at random intervals.’
      • ‘It is not something that crops up on a day to day basis in terms of business.’
      • ‘The key word here, which crops up throughout the report and the subsequent discussion, is ‘unwitting’.’
      • ‘So if 01788 crops up on your phone bill and you can't recall where that is, this site will reveal it is Rugby, Warwickshire.’
      • ‘They monitor the radios and they are ready to go if anything unusual crops up.’
      • ‘It's a condition most commonly found in women, but occasionally crops up in a man.’
      • ‘He crops up a couple of times almost at random.’
      • ‘Challenge is one word that crops up in Heather's conversation a lot.’
      • ‘If something crops up that interests me, whether it's here or overseas, then I'll look at it.’
      happen, occur, arise, arrive, turn up, spring up, pop up, surface, emerge, materialize, appear, come to light, present itself, make an appearance
      show up
      come to pass, befall
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Old English, of Germanic origin; related to German Kropf. From Old English to the late 18th century there existed a sense ‘flower head, ear of corn’, giving rise to crop and senses referring to the top of something, whence crop.