Main definitions of crock in English

: crock1crock2

crock1

noun

  • 1An earthenware pot or jar.

    ‘the runner beans were then packed in layers of salt in large crocks’
    • ‘Place six soup crocks on a sheet pan and ladle some soup into each.’
    • ‘Similarly, ‘printed’ butter could also be packed in large crocks, covered with salt water, and cooled in the springhouse.’
    • ‘She salted beans and onions in a crock, made jam and pickles, and preserved eggs.’
    • ‘From the bottom of her basket, she took a crock of salve.’
    • ‘But if you leave some salted and spiced cabbage leaves in a crock for a few weeks, the germ fairy will replace the contents with kimchi while you sleep.’
    • ‘Otherwise dump the contents of the crocks or vat into food-grade plastic mesh bags or cheesecloth and squeeze out as much wine as you can into a clean basin.’
    • ‘No, I do not have to go to the co-op, scoop it from a flyblown communal vat with a wooden spoon, put it in my reusable crock and carry it to the barter-counter with the handy hemp handle.’
    • ‘The sight of glazed russet crocks bearing chunky chicken scarpariello, steamy bowls of cioppino, and baked calamari gives an unexpected pleasure.’
    • ‘I purchased some much needed essentials for my utensil crock, an apron, a new tart pan and some hand soap.’
    • ‘You will need a large container for aging - big wide-mouthed glass jars with tightly sealing lids or ceramic crocks with lids are ideal.’
    • ‘How do they always hide their gold in a crock, or a pot, at the end of a rainbow?’
    • ‘During the winter months we go with crocks instead of water bottles for all of our outside rabbits.’
    • ‘The slices are then packed into a crock, which may first be lined with whole clean leaves.’
    • ‘When we were nearly done planting, Michael went down to the root cellar and brought back a bucket and two earthenware crocks.’
    • ‘Some of the houses were smaller than 10 square metres yet were packed with all kinds of wine crocks, failing to meet the necessary health and sanitation standards.’
    • ‘The beans, most often scarlet runners, were sliced and salted in a crock for the winter.’
    • ‘Feeling he should express gratitude for the woman's kindness, he held up the crock of salt pork and onions, but the words just wouldn't come.’
    • ‘A hen in a basket pokes her head out to drink from a chipped crock.’
    • ‘The brandied chicken-liver pâté (the sort of thing an ambitious Houston cook might pack into crocks to give friends at Christmas) still has the power to engage.’
    • ‘The first piece they bought together was a crock decorated with cobalt blue flowers for $150.’
    earthenware pot, pot, jar, urn, pitcher, jug, ewer
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A broken piece of earthenware.
      • ‘Last month's included a tip new to me, using teabags instead of crocks for the bottom of containers.’
    2. 1.2 A plate, cup, or other item of crockery.
      ‘I ate my tea and then I washed up the dirty crocks’
      • ‘Peter fires a hose of steaming water at the crocks before they're run through the main dishwashers.’
      • ‘In fact, if the dirty crocks get too mountainous, they can simply chuck them away.’
      crockery, pots, dishes, plates, bowls, cups
      View synonyms
  • 2North American informal Something considered to be complete nonsense.

    ‘this whole business of an electronic community is a crock’
    ‘what a crock!’

Origin

Old English croc, crocca, of Germanic origin; related to Old Norse krukka and probably to Dutch kruik and German Krug.

Pronunciation

crock

/krɒk/

Main definitions of crock in English

: crock1crock2

crock2

noun

British
informal
  • 1An old person who is considered to be feeble and useless.

    ‘I'm an old crock and he's an old buffer’
    • ‘How, a perplexed public is asking, did a thirty-nine year old crock manage to swim through the air and prevent what was a certain goal?’
    • ‘He plays a pompous old crock of a secondary teacher.’
    • ‘As we sprinted away from home plate, I found myself in the disconcerting position of being a step behind the old crock.’
    1. 1.1 An old and worn-out vehicle.

verb

[WITH OBJECT]British
informal
  • Injure (a person or part of the body)

    ‘he crocked a shoulder in the test against South Africa’
    ‘the striker was crocked in a practice match’
    • ‘Has anyone else nearly crocked their ankle on the newly re-laid cobbles?’
    • ‘He had got off to a flyer in the first Test against New Zealand, and then crocked his shoulder.’
    • ‘We started to get our excuses in early this year as soon the wunderkind crocked his toe.’
    • ‘He has a habit, he admits ruefully, of crocking himself.’
    • ‘Not one, or two, but three members of the governing group on City of York Council have crocked legs.’

Origin

Late Middle English: perhaps from Flemish, and probably related to crack. Originally a Scots term for an old ewe, it came in the late 19th century to denote an old or broken-down horse.

Pronunciation

crock

/krɒk/