Definition of crèche in English:

crèche

Pronunciation: /krɛʃ//kreɪʃ/

noun

  • 1British A nursery where babies and young children are cared for during the working day.

    • ‘Workers also want crèches established near work sites and residences to assist female construction workers.’
    • ‘A lot of parents are delighted with the quality of care at crèches and see their children thrive in a bigger group.’
    • ‘The new centre will include a crèche (with baby rooms), a playschool (with classes for different age groups) and after school care for older children.’
    • ‘In a family where parents work, children are looked after in a crèche or nursery, or taken in by a neighbour, older brother, or sister.’
    • ‘Judges were impressed with the cleanliness and efficiency of the premises' two gyms, its crèche facilities and social events laid on for its 3,200 members.’
    • ‘Services provided are similar to those in day nurseries and crèches.’
    • ‘Some of the core services include childcare facilities, which includes a crèche and playschool for children aged from babies up to 5 years.’
    • ‘A crèche is available for those with young children.’
    • ‘Daily costs, such as crèches, transport and utilities are soaring, so knowing how to budget is a crucial part of life.’
    • ‘Being so big, the scheme has room also for a crèche, shops, medical centre and an underground fitness centre with pool.’
    • ‘The new centre will give the area two swimming pools, a four-court sports hall, plus dance and fitness facilities with a crèche and cafeteria.’
    • ‘They have swimming pools, cafés with comfy sofas, beauty salons, bars and crèches that look after your children.’
    • ‘There is a day care crèche for children and other facilities for the community.’
    • ‘The city has more crèches, nurseries and nannies than anywhere else in Britain, according to research based on entries in the British Telecom directory.’
    • ‘Residents said the buildings could contain such facilities as a crèche and café to computer facilities and even a theatre.’
    • ‘Fitness facilities, the crèche and soft play activities will continue, but the pools are set to close as planned early next month.’
    • ‘To accommodate the working hours of parents the morning crèche can now facilitate a drop off time of 8.30 am.’
    • ‘Most use childminders in the home and only 10% send their children for care in crèches and nurseries.’
    • ‘A high-profile adult learning centre will also be created, along with a day nursery and crèche facilities.’
    • ‘Mothers call for more workplace crèches and job sharing, as well as curbs on violence, bad language and sex in the media.’
  • 2North American A representation of the nativity scene.

    • ‘One school in Pennsylvania, through its Multicultural Committee, set up a three-part display, with a crèche, a menorah, and a Kwanzaa scene.’

Origin

Late 18th century (in crèche): French (see also cratch).

Pronunciation:

crèche

/krɛʃ//kreɪʃ/