Definition of creature in English:

creature

noun

  • 1An animal, as distinct from a human being.

    ‘night sounds of birds and other creatures’
    • ‘All around her there was the activity of woodland creatures, birds and mammals, insects and fish, continuing their role in the environment.’
    • ‘Ticks rank right up there with bats, snakes and spiders as creatures that elicit fear and disgust at the mere mention of their name.’
    • ‘These creatures are quite distinct from fish, crustaceans, and molluscs.’
    • ‘One finds here myriads of beings and creatures with distinct characteristics.’
    • ‘On the ceiling of the cave, animal tracks can be seen, and there are fossils of many marine creatures - plus a bird fossil which looks like a chicken.’
    • ‘Despite incontrovertible and growing evidence that there were distinct eras of different creatures, the scientific community embraced the idea of gradualism.’
    • ‘Dogs, cats and creatures of all shapes, sizes and colours want to meet caring people to share life, love and happiness.’
    • ‘The term ‘waterbug’ refers to a wide variety of insects, including creatures such as worms and butterflies.’
    • ‘Mosquito larvae are an important food source for fish and other aquatic creatures, and the adults feed a lot of birds and bats.’
    • ‘These creatures include fish, crocodiles, turtles, hippopotamuses, monkeys, rodents, and antelopes.’
    • ‘Only 50 of these genetically distinct creatures survive in the region, comprising the northernmost population.’
    • ‘Most of the diet is made up of small fish, although a wide variety of sea creatures including crustaceans, marine worms, and squid are also taken.’
    • ‘Birds in coastal areas eat crabs and other aquatic creatures.’
    • ‘Single-celled creatures, insects, birds, whales, and humans move about for all sorts of reasons.’
    • ‘Just because many birds can fly, it does not follow that all creatures that fly are birds.’
    • ‘As it decays, it ties up dissolved oxygen, eventually causing creatures like shrimp, fish, crabs, and octopuses to suffocate.’
    • ‘Marine invertebrates feast on the wood, attracting other creatures from little fish, to birds and sharks.’
    • ‘Commonly thought of as insects, ticks are actually arachnids or eight-legged creatures, like the spider.’
    • ‘Reptiles are cold blooded scaly creatures like snakes, lizards, crocodiles and turtles, who are all descendants of the primitive reptile.’
    • ‘Marine biologists have reported a growing number of exotic fish and marine creatures in British waters.’
    animal, beast, brute
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    1. 1.1 An animal or person.
      ‘as fellow creatures on this planet, animals deserve respect’
      • ‘Wherever I go, I am awed by the diversity of our fellow creatures and their staggering variety of color, design, adaption and behavior.’
      • ‘We have failed in our stewardship of this bountiful creation, harming our fellow creatures and abusing the resources of the gracious earth.’
      • ‘We, and our fellow creatures, will be the beneficiaries.’
      • ‘We serve God best when we exercise our responsibilities locally, healing our fellow creatures within our damaged Earth community and kneeling with them in the praise of God.’
      • ‘The moral standing of our fellow creatures may be humble, but it is absolute and not something within our power to confer or withhold.’
      • ‘Observe how it interacts with its fellow creatures, and the vast variety of food it consumes every hour.’
      • ‘We Homo sapiens are fascinated by observing our fellow creatures as they go about their daily grind - eating, sleeping, courting.’
      • ‘But human beings are mortal creatures and subject to the whims of nature.’
      • ‘The company of one's fellow creatures was always the point of the public house.’
      • ‘In fact, a horrified response would be one of the means by which he or she would help to alert and enlighten his or her fellow creatures.’
      • ‘The most natural privilege of man, next to the right of acting for himself, is that of combining his exertions with those of his fellow creatures and of acting in common with them.’
      • ‘I look forward to sharing a lasting trust with my fellow creatures, learning from their ways and restoring that relationship we used to have with the animals given to our care.’
      • ‘In the beginning was the ancient fertility that accompanied the birth of Man and every of Man's fellow creatures, each speaking its own language.’
      • ‘Cows are innocent herbivores that would never knowingly consume the rendered remains of their fellow creatures.’
      • ‘Forgive us for the words, the choices, and the acts which bring grief to you and to our fellow creatures.’
      • ‘The last animal legends highlight the crazy swings in Americans' sentiments toward their fellow creatures.’
      • ‘They encourage the viewer to take a more compassionate look at his or her fellow creatures, including the most despised and marginalized.’
      • ‘We all have views about how our fellow creatures should be treated but it is in the nature of our democracy that the House of Commons decides the law.’
      • ‘I was brought up understanding that there were certain courtesies and considerations to be extended to all fellow creatures.’
      • ‘If you've ever looked into the eyes of a chimp or gorilla there's no denying that lurch of recognition for a fellow creature obviously capable of complex thoughts and feelings.’
      person, human being, human, being, mortal, soul, thing
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    2. 1.2 A fictional or imaginary being.
      ‘a creature from outer space’
      • ‘The fantasy creature category contained such imaginary creatures as fairy, hairy Cyclops, and gremlin.’
      • ‘The vampires had always been known to humans, though to most, only as fictional creatures.’
      • ‘They are entirely creatures of the imagination.’
      • ‘Of course, since dragons are mythical semimagical creatures anyway, it's difficult to guess what flight characteristics they might have.’
      • ‘Kira carried on walking, muttering angrily to herself about the absolute stupidity and selfishness of demons and mythical creatures.’
      • ‘Well, both Leviathan and Behemoth, the mythic and legendary giant creatures of the sea and the land respectively, are kosher.’
      • ‘So the only thing she could do was fight imaginary creatures.’
      • ‘To everyone else, all that existed about unicorns was that they were imaginary creatures that roamed the world.’
      • ‘The images consisted mainly of mythological creatures such as dragons, fairies, and merfolk.’
      • ‘Popular art images are flowers and imaginary creatures.’
      • ‘As a preliminary step to painting, we briefly discussed the fact that dragons are imaginary creatures.’
      • ‘I remember a time as a child when my sister and I shared an imaginary world of made-up creatures.’
      • ‘The novel's weight and mythical resonance depend on creatures that stretch the imagination and go beyond it.’
      • ‘Drawing the princesses and imaginative creatures she read about in the book led to a lifelong passion, and today her art continues to have a fairytale-like quality.’
      • ‘It's not the power given to mythological creatures and deities in fairy tales.’
      • ‘There are mythical creatures like dragons, cobras and emblems like the solid Maltese cross.’
      • ‘There were fairies, gnomes, dragons and assorted other creatures watching curiously from a safe distance.’
      • ‘During this time people put on morality plays about ghosts, goblins, virgins, and other mythical creatures.’
      • ‘There are no vampires, werewolves, zombies or outer space creatures.’
      • ‘Both movies have a big-name comedian dressed up as a fictional creature.’
    3. 1.3with adjective A person of a specified kind.
      ‘you heartless creature!’
      • ‘But do not expect any lovable creatures and charming subjects here.’
      • ‘What wretched creature would give up the fight before he's truly lost?’
      • ‘The freedom which men of long ago had did not blind them nor did it transform them into heartless creatures.’
      • ‘Human beings are creatures of peace, and we shouldn't resist our natures, but when everyone else around you seem to be resisting their natures it's difficult for me not to.’
      • ‘Rachel moved her eyes down to this charming creature's face.’
      • ‘Most human beings are conflicted creatures and, to paraphrase George Orwell, some are more conflicted than others.’
      • ‘Spin fantasies in your head, she's probably the most charming and intelligent creature on earth.’
      • ‘We human beings are fallible creatures, and we have a habit of seeing only the survivors of a set of experiences.’
      • ‘The girl was a pretty feminine creature with hatred toward men.’
      • ‘‘Human beings are sexual creatures and if you tell them they can't have sex it's going to come out some way or other,’ she says.’
      • ‘People are imaginative creatures, though, and they'll find a way to refer to it somehow.’
      • ‘And Irma, that vain, wretched creature, would never take such an unnecessary risk to herself as that.’
      • ‘He said: ‘I just thought she was the most beautiful creature I'd ever seen in my life and I had to find out about her.’’
      fellow, individual, character, wretch, beggar, soul
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  • 2A person or organization considered to be under the complete control of another.

    ‘the village teacher was expected to be the creature of his employer’
    • ‘They should also realise that international organisations are the creatures of the governments which created and manage them.’
    • ‘She was as much a creature of the control freaks as any of the weaker members of the front bench.’
    minion, lackey, flunkey, hireling, subordinate, servant, retainer, vassal
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  • 3archaic Anything living or existing.

    ‘dress, jewels, and other transitory creatures’
    • ‘Like organic creatures, copyrights used to age and wither away.’
    • ‘In addition, there will be different variations of existing creatures.’
    • ‘An ancient race of horrible organic creatures becomes a threat.’
    • ‘Maybe he was prejudiced against humans, or even organic creatures in general.’

Phrases

  • creature of habit

    • A person who follows an unvarying routine.

      ‘he's a creature of habit—he keeps to the places he knows’
      • ‘I'm also a man with a routine, or as Amy calls me, a creature of habit.’
      • ‘I'll miss the staff more than anything else, but also the regular routine because I'm definitely a creature of habit.’
      • ‘We, being creatures of habit, ordered exactly the same meals.’
      • ‘Ducks are creatures of habit, they like routine.’
      • ‘They are both creatures of habit and love their routine: writing, walking, reading and going to bed at 10 pm every night.’
      • ‘When it comes to hairstyles, cologne, clothing, and even daily routines, most of us are creatures of habit.’
      • ‘Most people are creatures of habit in voting.’
      • ‘We humans are a strange breed, creatures of habit, this one small change in my routine has rendered me flummoxed.’
      • ‘I guess making changes is difficult for most people as we are all creatures of habit but we must stretch ourselves both at work and in our personal lives if we want to grow and develop.’
      • ‘They have strong family bonds and are creatures of habit, so much so that when habitat changes, as by logging or development, deer may be slow to move elsewhere.’

Origin

Middle English (in the sense ‘something created’): via Old French from late Latin creatura, from the verb creare (see create).

Pronunciation

creature

/ˈkriːtʃə/