Main definitions of cray in English

: cray1cray2

cray1

noun

Australian, NZ
  • A crayfish.

    • ‘Well, so far the islands are actually so difficult to get to it's only cray fishermen that tend to occasionally visit the island.’
    • ‘Small European crayfish and larger signal crays form a large part of a carp's diet.’
    • ‘The workshop produces about six cray fishing vessels a year.’
    • ‘He was charging the cray fishermen a fee to cross Maori land to launch their boats.’
    • ‘The price was about 20 percent higher this year so that was a win as long as you caught the crays.’
    • ‘Instead he worked on a cray boat in Dongara, then later moved to Geraldton where he stacked bricks.’

Origin

Early 20th century: abbreviation.

Pronunciation:

cray

/kreɪ/

Main definitions of cray in English

: cray1cray2

cray2

(also cray cray)

adjective

US
informal
  • Crazy.

    ‘I have a feeling this is gonna get cray’
    ‘she's cray cray’
    • ‘You can act, sure, but those eyes are cray cray with paranoia.’
    • ‘Today the interwebs went all kinds of cray when Beyonce did the unthinkable and revealed a super-short new 'do.’
    • ‘Celebrity interviews can be cray sometimes.’
    • ‘While the experience would make even the most stable person go a little cray, Sam seems to have remained a pretty normal chick.’
    • ‘She be cray cray, but she's hella talented.’
    • ‘While filming at her old college stomping ground in Arizona, the reality TV couple got a little cray!’
    • ‘Yes, it's another movie about a man who goes cray looking for his daughter's kidnapper.’
    • ‘Doing this night after night was pretty cray, but I loved every minute of it.’
    • ‘Now, I didn't necessarily think that she needed to lose weight, but she clearly wanted to change some things, and she's been hitting up the gym like cray.’
    • ‘I know a lot of people just think he's totally cray (he is), but I also know he can be (and act) grown when he chooses to.’

Origin

Early 21st century: abbreviation.

Pronunciation:

cray

/kreɪ/