Definition of cram in English:

cram

verb

  • 1with object Completely fill (a place or container) to the point of overflowing.

    ‘the ashtray by the bed was crammed with cigarette butts’
    • ‘The place is crammed with them, far too many to take in during one visit.’
    • ‘The place is crammed with cinema memorabilia - room after room packed full of it.’
    • ‘Every public place, including the hospital, schools and churches, are crammed to capacity.’
    • ‘Cars are filled and shopping centres and retail parks are crammed to capacity.’
    • ‘The episodes on the second volume worked because they were crammed to the brim with jokes.’
    • ‘Unlike her last, this is not an album crammed to the brim with hit singles.’
    • ‘This salsa is very chunky and crammed full of tomatoes.’
    • ‘Instead she found herself in a room so crammed full of people that there was nowhere for her to sit.’
    • ‘I agree with most people, the place is crammed with achingly cool Danes.’
    • ‘A favourite with day-trippers, the small town is crammed with glittering gift shops, candyfloss and tourists.’
    • ‘The place was crammed with Turkish fans who couldn't wait for their heroes to become world champions.’
    • ‘Many of these works are crammed with details and it is humanly impossible to recreate them.’
    • ‘The flyover, roads and even pavements are crammed with vehicles.’
    • ‘The caravan park was crammed with campers, vans and tents.’
    • ‘Like all the entries in the encyclopedia, this one is crammed with details.’
    • ‘Our livestock buildings are becoming ever more crammed, ruling out species-specific animal husbandry.’
    • ‘Sighing loudly, I made my way back into the hall which was now crammed to capacity.’
    • ‘Each bus is crammed full of passengers, luggage strapped on the roof racks.’
    • ‘The room was crammed with suitcases, footwear, clothes and other odds and ends strewn carelessly around.’
    • ‘For example issues of the Chronicle of Higher Education are crammed to the brim with advertising from online education companies.’
    stuff, pack, jam, fill, crowd, throng
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    1. 1.1 Force (people or things) into a place or container that is or appears to be too small to contain them.
      ‘it's amazing how you've managed to cram everyone in’
      figurative ‘he had crammed so much into his short life’
      • ‘How did you cram so many nice things about me in that review?’
      • ‘There was a lifetimes worth of knowledge, all crammed into a room's worth of books.’
      • ‘To say I crammed too many tomatoes into that small section is an understatement.’
      • ‘Crammed into the truck are men and women wearing yellow stars.’
      • ‘The average age of the 2,000 squealing fans crammed into the Civic Hall is 14.’
      • ‘Hidden because she works at home on sewing machines crammed into a corner of her laundry.’
      • ‘There are dwellings crammed into every corner, up high and down low.’
      • ‘Yesterday all my stuff arrived in Brixton and is now crammed into my room.’
      • ‘Developers are seeking to cram far too many dwellings on to the site.’
      • ‘In every issue you folks manage to cram lots of good stuff onto those pages.’
      • ‘The chamber was now so tightly crammed with pallets that there was scarcely room to walk between them.’
      • ‘Everyone has seen on television a packed football ground with 50,000 spectators crammed together.’
      • ‘Over 300 people can be crammed tightly in the car whose capacity is only 200 people.’
      • ‘When he observed the multitude of people crammed into the small space, he stopped short.’
      • ‘Once again, writers like to cram a lot of material into a single sentence.’
      • ‘Are the brightly-coloured birds you see crammed into cages by street vendors being sold illegally?’
      • ‘The room was lined with bears, crammed into tiny isolation cages.’
      • ‘Because they are crammed so tightly, the birds go crazy and peck at each other.’
      • ‘Don't try to cram too many people around a small dining room table.’
      • ‘There are about perhaps 500 people crammed into this small space.’
      • ‘All 20 of us were crammed into a cage, it really was a squeeze.’
      force, ram, thrust, plunge, push, pile, stick, jam, pack, compress, squeeze, wedge, press, tamp, pound, drive, hammer, bang
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    2. 1.2no object (of a number of people) enter a place that is too small to accommodate all of them.
      ‘they all crammed into the car’
      • ‘The 5,000 strong crowd crammed into an airplane hanger in rural Ohio.’
      • ‘Numbers of backers crammed into schools and auditoriums.’
      • ‘A crowd of 7,575 crammed into Gigg Lane for the game.’
      • ‘A crowd of over 400 crammed into the hall, leaving standing room only, to join the record numbers of award winners.’
      • ‘People crammed into cars with their household possessions and drove out of the city.’
      • ‘Thousands more crammed into an adjacent room to listen via closed-circuit TV.’
      • ‘Crowds will cram into Cathedral Square to be among the first in the world to witness the dawn of the 21st century.’
      • ‘Husband, wife and son crammed into the boot of his car.’
      • ‘Everyone crammed in the car about a hour later all talking excitedly.’
      • ‘Everyone crammed into the insufficient accommodation as best they could.’
      • ‘Jazz fans crammed in to Westcliff's Cliffs Pavilion for the Echo's charity jazz night.’
      • ‘On the first night it was opened, twice that number of people crammed in.’
      • ‘My friends had invited me on a drive so we all crammed in the car and set off.’
      • ‘Strictly speaking, the club's crowd limit was around 50, but at least double that number usually crammed in.’
      • ‘I crammed unceremoniously into their car.’
      • ‘At Victoria Park, fans crammed into any space available.’
      • ‘We crammed out the backseat of the crummy car, and took what little we had out of the trunk.’
      • ‘There were 4 people that just crammed into the small car.’
      • ‘So we all crammed into the car and headed to the Dells.’
      • ‘Normally, we have a big car, but it's in the shop, so we have to cram into our other small car.’
      crowd, crush, pack, jam, squash, wedge oneself, shove, push, jostle, throng, force one's way, thrust
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  • 2no object Study intensively over a short period of time just before an examination.

    ‘lectures were called off so students could cram for the semester finals’
    • ‘It was their final year of university and all the students were beginning to cram for final examinations.’
    • ‘Justine remembered that Kylie had been cramming mightily for the test when they last spoke.’
    • ‘Parents drive their children to cram up for examinations and woe forbid, if the child is a prodigy.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, after holidays comes the time to rush to finish projects, and then cram for exams.’
    • ‘There are too many students who believe in cramming rather than studying.’
    • ‘When they weren't cramming for the upcoming tests they were practicing for the contest.’
    • ‘A familiar sight during the exam period; as drowsiness sets in, coffee helps a student stay awake and cram for those finals.’
    • ‘Even for a fast learner, though, four months is an awfully short time to cram.’
    • ‘The camera followed this fish out of water rocker as he auditions for the marching band and crams for finals.’
    • ‘The two college students cramming for finals at the next table certainly agreed.’
    • ‘How many times had they crammed for exams on the soft, overstuffed couch?’
    • ‘Students really should get a good night's sleep after cramming for an exam.’
    • ‘I crammed for a week before taking Step 2 of the Boards.’
    • ‘Students cram for mid-term and final exams, and attend lectures for the rest of the semester.’
    • ‘Sitara wandered over to the round tables, were several students crammed together, their heads bent and studying.’
    • ‘Unlike fanatical me, they were all planning on cramming for their finals.’
    • ‘He'll get up at 5.30 the next morning for a final cram.’
    • ‘I registered to take the February exam, paid $6 for the study booklet, and crammed for a week before the test.’
    • ‘I was rushing to get to class-and trying to cram for my next period's geography quiz.’
    • ‘This will help me forgetting it, yet I know I will just be another student who crams.’
    study intensively, revise
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Origin

Old English crammian, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch krammen ‘to cramp or clamp’.

Pronunciation

cram

/kram/