Definition of cottage in English:

cottage

noun

  • 1A small house, typically one in the country.

    ‘a holiday cottage’
    • ‘They have also refurbished cottages to provide holiday lets for visitors and sportsmen.’
    • ‘Behind the castle was a small village of simple little cottages.’
    • ‘We lived in a cozy cottage here and ate simple delicious meals.’
    • ‘Next weekend I start a week's holiday in a cottage in the Cotswalds.’
    • ‘Stepping inside, Allie paused to look around at the cottage's simple elegance.’
    • ‘Each has its own problems, made up of a different mix of second homes, holiday cottages, long-distance commuters and the wealthy retired.’
    • ‘Many city dwellers still view themselves as partly rural, a fact attested to by a weekend and holiday return to cottages in the countryside.’
    • ‘From the front, the home would be a simple white cottage with a welcoming front porch, topped by a high, peaked black roof.’
    • ‘What if a very noisy family takes the cottage for a weekend retreat?’
    • ‘His newest home was a simple cottage, with a small attic under the roof.’
    • ‘It was the simple cottage where he had spent his childhood, recreated in perfect detail.’
    • ‘The most popular form of relaxation for city dwellers is to spend a weekend at a country cottage.’
    • ‘Located in an area of great natural beauty, this tastefully restored farm cottage will appeal to those seeking peace and seclusion.’
    • ‘About a third of homes in the upper Yorkshire Dales are second homes or holiday cottages and three-quarters of house sales are to outsiders.’
    • ‘Those who live in Prague spend their holidays in country cottages working in the garden and enjoying the outdoors.’
    • ‘The isolated cottage is surrounded by rolling hills with arable farms, and forest.’
    • ‘The properties are a mixture of units, town houses, cottages and villas, with an average of two occupants per dwelling.’
    • ‘Sixty houses are believed to have been built by him and rented out at moderate rates, and poor children were invited to his country cottage during the summer holidays.’
    • ‘Around a dozen estate houses and cottages, a farm and 704 acres of forestry complete the picture.’
    • ‘Some 40 per cent of the houses are either holiday cottages or weekend havens for wealthy townies.’
    1. 1.1 A simple house forming part of a farm, used by a worker.
      ‘farm cottages’
      • ‘Corporal Robert Moulton, farm supervisor, lived in the cottage built on the farm until 1857.’
      • ‘Access to the bunker is through a cellar door in a farm cottage next to a quiet road.’
      • ‘Budding archaeologists will be able to ‘excavate’ a medieval burial site as well as parts of a Roman fortress, a Viking city and Victorian workers' cottages.’
      • ‘The first permanent settlers built a stone cottage on the farm in 1852.’
      • ‘The road then bends to the right, past a farm cottage with a boisterous beck tumbling from the brackened heights behind.’
      • ‘Now often the single men working on a farm have a cottage for accommodation and cook for themselves.’
      • ‘Sam started his talk by showing how things were in days gone by, showing slides of a once thriving community, including a school, cottages for the cement workers, and most importantly the ferryman's house.’
      • ‘The production company has applied for the access road that leads to the farm and four cottages to be closed 24-hours a day for a month for filming purposes.’
      • ‘Skelton expanded during the 19th century when cottages for farm labourers were built as well as some larger houses.’
      • ‘Kicking the farm workers out of their cottages and jobs without compensation just seemed like vengeance.’
      • ‘After a quiet stretch, the road passes a disused quarry on the right and then reaches a farm and some cottages.’
      • ‘There are some days when the trees just seem greener than ever, the cottages and farms seem more romantic, and the sunshine seems to follow in your path.’
      • ‘The house wasn't like other houses; most were simple cottages with a small tool shed and the occasional barn and garden.’
      • ‘All except one are outside in converted farm cottages, just a quick saunter across a courtyard.’
      • ‘We were able to hire experienced blade shearers who stayed in the cottage on the farm.’
      • ‘I'd hoped to keep up the work in a freelance, semidetached kind of way, but in reality, I spent most of my days feathering our nest - a cottage on the farm.’
      • ‘Crouching, he could see through the window to the farm fields behind the cottage.’
      • ‘Back then, Rawcliffe was a nothing but a village of two farms and five cottages.’
      • ‘When you step onto the cupped stair tread of an old farm cottage or Victorian rambler you think of all the people who passed this way before you.’
      • ‘Money was also poured into building cottages for estate workers, servants quarters at the back of the new castle, additional workshops and new stables.’
      small house, house, bungalow, villa, lodge, chalet, cabin, shack, shanty
      View synonyms
  • 2British informal (in the context of casual homosexual encounters) a public toilet.

verb

[NO OBJECT]usually as noun cottaging
British
informal
  • Perform homosexual acts in a public toilet.

    ‘I was busted for cottaging’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Anglo-Norman French cotage and Anglo-Latin cotagium, from cot or cote.

Pronunciation

cottage

/ˈkɒtɪdʒ/