Main definitions of cosh in English

: cosh1cosh2

cosh1

noun

British
informal
  • A thick, heavy stick or bar used as a weapon.

    ‘the defendants deny having a self-loading pistol and a telescopic cosh’
    • ‘It was claimed in court that he probably struck the first blow with an extended cosh.’
    • ‘Masked men armed with a machete and cosh burst into a busy town centre amusement arcade and forced terrified staff to open the safe and hand over a large amount of cash.’
    • ‘When the lockers were later searched coshes, knives, bayonets, and swords were found.’
    • ‘Under the settee in the lounge officers also found a machete and two wooden coshes.’
    • ‘He said he had been threatened with guns, knives and hammers and attacked with a cosh in the past.’
    • ‘He said: ‘We want to take away the potential for knives, coshes and an array of other items to be used in crime.’’
    • ‘‘They brought coshes, lead piping and cut-down billiard cues with them.’’
    • ‘More than 260 knives, coshes, guns and bayonets went on show yesterday as West Yorkshire Police revealed the potentially lethal array of weapons handed in during an amnesty.’
    • ‘He has also been fined and jailed for having weapons including a pistol, coshes and saw-blades.’
    • ‘Weapons wanted in the amnesty include those with a blade or sharp point, such as knives and machetes, CS gas canisters, coshes and knuckle dusters.’
    • ‘Some were armed with bottles and others brandished weapons including coshes or iron bars, a screwdriver and a knife.’
    • ‘Officers acting on a tip-off swooped on a gang of robbers, believed to be armed with knives and coshes, just after they had held up a security van.’
    • ‘But there is no doubt that my client used the cosh and probably struck Mr Bourne about the head.’
    • ‘He is also charged with possession of two coshes.’
    • ‘With respect, the use of a knife as opposed to the use of a cosh in their minds is clearly something quite different.’
    • ‘A jury convicted him in May of illegally possessing the gas, a lock knife and a cosh at the airport.’
    • ‘It houses thousands of weapons, including guns and ammunition, knives, knuckledusters, coshes, crossbows and swords.’
    • ‘The cosh and the teargas, he said, were left over from his evening job as a bouncer, and he had just forgotten to unpack them before travelling.’
    club, bludgeon, stick, truncheon, baton, blackthorn, mace, bat
    View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]British
informal
  • Hit (someone) on the head with a cosh.

    ‘the other coshed him and he fell unconscious’
    • ‘The columnist coshed me on the back of the head and, while I was out, dumped me in the uncharted territory of his foreign policy mistakes.’
    • ‘The men rushed into the shop, coshed the manager, and attacked Mr Chapman and another assistant.’
    • ‘Sorry, it feels like somebody coshed me from behind.’
    • ‘I always tend to choose chairs which allow me to see the whole room and that I feel uncomfortable standing on the street with my back exposed in case someone comes and coshes me.’
    • ‘A conspiratorial hush proceeds to cosh the masses, precipitating a muffled ripple of applause as the Mayor and his entourage take to the stand.’
    • ‘He was coshed over the head by two balaclava clad men who made off with the money.’
    • ‘Fourteen years after this was made, the idea of robberies from trains, and indeed coshing drivers - coolly omitted from the professor's sophistical account of what harm his thieves have really done - lost a smidgen of its innocence.’
    • ‘He yelled before he was coshed on the head, by a blunt object.’
    • ‘They threatened to cosh him if he refused to hand over the phone.’
    • ‘Each member brought a particular skill to the gang, which successfully robbed the night mail train to London, causing serious head injuries when they coshed the train driver, who never fully recovered.’
    • ‘Detectives in Accrington today renewed their appeal for information about a robbery in which a shopkeeper was believed to be coshed with a gun.’
    • ‘If D coshes V and he dies, D would be liable for murder as he intended to cause grievous bodily harm.’
    hit over the head, hit on the head, hit, strike, buffet, bang, knock, thwack, slug, welt, cuff, punch, smash
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Phrases

  • under the cosh

    • informal Under pressure; in a difficult situation.

      ‘car dealers are under the cosh right now’
      • ‘They are not the only public sector workers who are under the cosh.’
      • ‘Our defence has been under the cosh, leaking goals.’
      • ‘Shell-shocked Derby spent the remainder of the first-half under the cosh.’
      • ‘There are also well-grounded suspicions that they are used for internal repression to keep the extremist factions under the cosh.’
      • ‘The visitors are really under the cosh at the moment.’
      • ‘The psychological effect on farmers, already economically under the cosh, was frightening.’
      • ‘He wrote sympathetically about highlanders under the cosh from rapacious landlords.’
      • ‘However, not all suppliers are under the cosh or close to bankruptcy.’
      • ‘In a game dominated by the weather Portarlington were under the cosh for most of the game.’
      • ‘We are really under the cosh in terms of costs.’
      hard-pressed, troubled, in difficulties, under pressure, under stress, with one's back to the wall, in a tight corner, in a tight spot
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Origin

Mid 19th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

cosh

/kɒʃ/

Main definitions of cosh in English

: cosh1cosh2

cosh2

Pronunciation /kɒʃ//kɒˈseɪtʃ/

Mathematics
  • Hyperbolic cosine.

Origin

From cos + -h for hyperbolic. Compare with coth.

Pronunciation

cosh

/kɒʃ//kɒˈseɪtʃ/