Main definitions of cos in English

: cos1cos2cos3

cos1

(also cos lettuce)

noun

British
  • A lettuce of a variety with crisp narrow leaves that form a tall head.

    • ‘Roughly tear the cos into pieces and place in a large salad bowl.’
    • ‘These cabbages have more than one shape, for example long and narrow like a cos lettuce, or less long and barrel shaped in profile.’
    • ‘Place cos leaves in a serving bowl then spoon in the lamb mixture.’
    • ‘To start I had the Greek salad of cos and oak leaf lettuce, red and yellow peppers, paper thin red onion slices, creamy feta cheese and a herb and mustard vinaigrette.’
    • ‘A cos will serve 8, an iceberg about 10 and a butter lettuce will serve 4,’
    • ‘The new lettuce appears to be a cross between a cos and a deep red radicchio.’
    • ‘Lettuces fall into three basic categories - cos, crisp head and loose leaf types.’

Origin

Late 17th century: named after the Aegean island of Cos, where it originated.

Pronunciation:

cos

/kɒs/

Main definitions of cos in English

: cos1cos2cos3

cos2

  • Cosine.

Pronunciation:

cos

/kɒs//kɒz/

Main definitions of cos in English

: cos1cos2cos3

cos3

(also 'cos)

conjunction

British
informal
  • Because.

    ‘I got quite upset, cos I'd worked so hard’
    See also coz, cuz
    • ‘I can only hope for his sake that he wasn't, coz some of the answers he gave were plain awful!’
    • ‘I didn't want to turn around and take a pic of the mountain cos that might be deemed ‘rude’.’
    • ‘I didn't take it off while shopping, coz then I'd have to waste time wrestling back into it.’
    • ‘This is according to the man who failed to raise the alarm cos he couldn't tell what the problem was.’
    • ‘At the moment there's a backlash cos everyone's filming people arguing, spitting and cussing each other.’
    • ‘Edgar says its ridiculous cos how does one tell time with a watch face so small?’
    • ‘Sorry - can't give much more of a reference at the moment cos I gave my copy to an equally cheerful friend.’
    • ‘Just cos it was for charity doesn't mean he couldn't do it properly.’
    • ‘I'm not saying any more at the moment cos as my luck goes, I won't get it.’
    • ‘I went and sat in the dining room coz the table is big and my desk is too small for that kind of studying.’
    • ‘He reckons I should be able to spot him easily cos he's very tall.’
    • ‘It took us a while to leave coz Clayton had misplaced his keys somewhere and we spent some time looking for them.’
    • ‘He came to the studio cos he was interested to hear more of my stuff.’
    • ‘I needed to clear my name cos that's my livelihood, for myself and my fans.’
    • ‘It's such a shame coz everything else I'm wearing is actually quite nice.’
    • ‘I'm not sure why I've never called her by name coz it's not like she'd mind.’
    • ‘Take a look now, coz I'll probably have given it up by the end of the week.’
    • ‘I had to leave my school cos my girlfriend broke up with me.’
    • ‘At lunch time I stand by myself in the playground cos none of the children will play with me and if I ask to play with them they say okay and then they ignore me.’
    • ‘Only look at it if you don't have to be anywhere for hours, coz you won't be able to tear yourself away.’

Pronunciation:

cos

/kəz//kɒz/