Definition of corsage in English:

corsage

Pronunciation /ˈkɔːsɑːʒ//kɔːˈsɑːʒ/

noun

  • 1A spray of flowers worn pinned to a woman's clothes.

    • ‘The proper way for the corsage to be worn is the flower going upward and the stems down.’
    • ‘The homecoming corsages wilt and disintegrate but the yearbooks, in all their forms, hang around for a lifetime reminding us all of the worst and the best of those adolescent years.’
    • ‘Perhaps best known as a corsage flower for a prom, wedding, or other special occasion, a gardenia also makes a great gift as a potted plant.’
    • ‘I ran down my list of things to get: got the flowers and corsages, got a ride, and got my outfit.’
    • ‘The boutonnières, corsages and bouquet were all yellow roses, just blooming, to match the bridesmaids' gowns.’
    • ‘Mark was in the florist shop, picking out a series of flowers to place in a corsage.’
    • ‘I wouldn't mind a quiet guy who gave me nice corsages.’
    • ‘We know we deserve to be met at our flat, perhaps given a corsage, before we step out.’
    • ‘Quietly, he reached into a box and pulled out a corsage, a lotus flower, and pinned it to the strap of Diana's dress.’
    • ‘These large flowers are exquisite and unique for corsages.’
    • ‘The church people gave out corsages to the mothers, and of course the flower pinned to the leaf was an orchid.’
    • ‘Roy adjusted the pedals of the corsage's bright yellow flower until they were just perfect.’
    • ‘As for flowers, a small corsage you can pin on her coat gives you a reason to be face to face with her for several seconds at meeting.’
    • ‘The eyes had been shadowed and the lips painted, the corsages had been attached, the flowers admired and the chocolates eaten.’
    • ‘Maryann wore a wrist corsage and the other bridesmaids had posies of roses.’
    • ‘A modest corsage or arrangement of flowers from your own garden is much more meaningful than an expensive purchase from the floral shop.’
    • ‘The corsage is on, dinner reservations are made, picture appointments are scheduled, and of course, you're wearing the perfect dress.’
    • ‘I even had a red flower corsage tied around my wrist!’
    • ‘And at Christmas all the waitresses wore corsages.’
    • ‘All that was missing was the corsage, and he almost felt guilty for not bringing one.’
    bouquet, bunch, posy, nosegay
    View synonyms
  • 2The upper part of a woman's dress.

    • ‘In fact, it would've been a Lion gala dress had it had a lace corsage and black trimming…’
    • ‘She was dressed in a fancy, long dress with a tight-looking corsage, and was holding an umbrella on one hand and apparently the same locket they had found on the other.’
    • ‘The satin tablier in front was gracefully draped with white tucked Brussels net, and the corsage was made high to the throat and ruched at the neck.’

Origin

Early 19th century (in corsage (sense 2)): French, from Old French cors ‘body’, from Latin corpus.

Pronunciation

corsage

/ˈkɔːsɑːʒ//kɔːˈsɑːʒ/