Definition of corps in English:

corps

noun

  • 1[often in names] A main subdivision of an army in the field, consisting of two or more divisions.

    ‘the 5th Army Corps’
    • ‘The same challenges on a larger scale permeate division and corps level Battle Command Training Program exercises.’
    • ‘His rise in command was rapid, from brigade to division to corps.’
    • ‘Two or more divisions form a corps, which is commanded by a lieutenant general and has from 20,000 to 45,000 soldiers.’
    • ‘On the down side, the British army was not a unified army in the sense of divisions and corps sized units.’
    • ‘The thorough integration of intelligence will certainly extend to the transformation of our divisions and corps.’
    • ‘Since the beginning of February, entire divisions, corps and battalions from various military bases in Germany have been transferred to the Gulf.’
    • ‘By decree from on high, corps and division commanders could not employ more than two platoons in offensive action.’
    • ‘Additionally, division, corps, and Army headquarters, along with their missions, will be realigned.’
    • ‘Grouped into corps, the panzer divisions proved tactically and operationally decisive.’
    • ‘The crown prince of Saxony was given the new Meuse Army, comprising three of First Army's corps and two cavalry divisions.’
    • ‘I will remind you of the magnificent noncommissioned officers that lead our Army from corps to division, and all the way down to crew level.’
    • ‘For easier control of its artillery it was therefore normal to find divisions, corps, and even armies made up entirely of artillery.’
    • ‘Two to five divisions constitute a corps, which is typically commanded by a lieutenant general.’
    • ‘The troop commander should have a focus that is essentially provided by the corps or division commander.’
    • ‘Instead of deploying corps, our heavy divisions sufficed.’
    • ‘The Army's traditional brigade, divisional, corps, and ASCC structure also is being reviewed.’
    • ‘However, brigades, divisions, corps, and armies formed only as needed in wartime and were promptly disbanded during peacetime.’
    • ‘Large units like divisions or corps are expensive and archaic.’
    • ‘Once these units were sworn into federal service, they would be organized into brigades, divisions, and army corps along with regular army units.’
    • ‘The earlier created air-defense areas were disbanded and air defense districts, armies, corps, and divisions restored.’
    brigade, regiment, battalion, company, troop, division, squadron, squad, platoon, contingent, unit, force, garrison, section, group, detachment, commando, battery, band, outfit, cohort
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A branch of an army assigned to a particular kind of work.
      ‘the Royal Army Medical Corps’
      • ‘Rifle and cavalry corps were assigned for operations on the outer perimeter of envelopment.’
      • ‘Military academies produce leaders in all branches of the officer corps.’
      • ‘Also the army corps of engineers is giving out blue tarps for people who did suffer damage.’
      • ‘Will you be assigned to the radar corps or the mess tent?’
      • ‘Tonight, it is a job for the U.S. Marine Corps.’
      • ‘As a result, the Army kept him from going overseas and assigned him a job in the motor corps at his base.’
      • ‘By 1900, all modern armies had established balloon corps to provide timely and accurate battlefield intelligence.’
      • ‘Nez, now 78, volunteered to join the marine corps when he was in high school.’
      • ‘He was conscripted in 1939 but, because he was blind in his right eye, he was assigned to the medical corps.’
      • ‘Probably no other topic has evoked as much passion in discussions among military logisticians as the establishment of a single logistics branch or corps.’
      • ‘The country was accordingly divided into defense zones, each assigned to an army corps.’
      • ‘The Irish Defence Forces have army, naval service and air corps branches.’
      • ‘The WAC then became a separate corps of the Regular Army.’
      • ‘But what about all the warnings from the army corps of engineers?’
    2. 1.2[with adjective or noun modifier]A body of people engaged in a particular activity.
      ‘at 9:30 a.m., the press corps was handed what looked to be a routine list of orders’
      • ‘So now the question is: Will anyone in the Washington press corps pick up on this development?’
      • ‘We don't recognize him, so Rachel asks Andy, a photographer and fellow press corps member, who he is.’
      • ‘A small corps of people at corporate headquarters is nominated to keep critical services like IT working - if possible.’
      • ‘I think, by and large, this press corps likes George Bush as a person.’
      • ‘Mr Peare was one of the first corps of business studies graduates to emerge from Trinity College in 1965.’
      • ‘Out of this band has emerged a highly visible corps of hands-free devotees.’
      • ‘The Afghan press corps stampede Blair as he emerges from the plane.’
      • ‘By the time I arrived, several press corps members had been escorted off the reservation.’
      • ‘Well, right after the plane was reported, most of the White House staff and press corps were told to leave the White House grounds.’
      • ‘As it happens, Jones was assigned to the corps of beam fitters - workers, Thomson assumes, who invariably labor alone.’
      • ‘I suppose they're quite a hardened bunch, the international press corps?’
      • ‘Others in the press corps didn't think there was anything untoward about giving political advice to Goldwater opponent Lyndon Johnson.’
      • ‘When the team's current defensive corps fades or burns out, reliable new blood will be needed.’
      • ‘First, rather than integrating media affairs in its planning, the command simply handed off the press to a specialized corps of public affairs officers.’
      • ‘I write to you from a special corps of the Central Intelligence Agency, CIA, with an offer for you to work for us.’
      • ‘We depend on a well-educated professional corps of enlisted people.’
      • ‘Having completely denied the White House press corps access, the administration isn't exactly in a position to threaten to withhold access.’
      • ‘In front of the cynical audience that is Scotland's political press corps, he impressed several with his performance.’
      • ‘Whilst there has been no official comment on the new measures, sources close to the government have confirmed that a special corps of Dome protection personnel is planned.’
      • ‘The Secret Service evacuated the White House, the press corps, the remaining staff there.’
    3. 1.3
      short for corps de ballet
      • ‘Graham was concerned with theatrical balance between corps and soloists, performers and the space around them.’
      • ‘Monica Mason encourages every member of the corps in a ballet like Romeo and Juliet to invent their own character and story.’
      • ‘Perhaps no one works more intimately with the corps than the ballet masters.’
      • ‘In the dance studio, I watch Hayley Farr, a member of San Francisco Ballet's corps.’
      • ‘While in the corps of The Royal Ballet, he was injured, and he spent time watching television while healing.’

Origin

Late 16th century: from French, from Latin corpus body.

Pronunciation:

corps

/kɔː/